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ickle_katy
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#41
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#41
delete your original post.
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ickle_katy
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Bigcnee)
Happy St. Patrick's Day everyone, and be proud to be Irish.

and i did remeber....i just slept late!

happy st patricks day to all the irish/wannab irish forumites!

love Katy ***
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Bigcnee
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#43
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#43
Erm.... I can't.

I don't suppose if would matter if we had two, i.e. one for each eye.
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PQ
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#44
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#44
ok so it's for caffreys but guiness has a similar effect
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ickle_katy
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#45
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(Original post by Bigcnee)
Erm.... I can't.

I don't suppose if would matter if we had two, i.e. one for each eye.
or i could just merge them inot one big thread...

love Katy***
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Bigcnee
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#46
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(Original post by ickle_katy)
or i could just merge them inot one big thread...

love Katy***
Sweet.
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Chicken
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#47
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Happy St Patricks Day...cheap Guinness tonight then!
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Bigcnee
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#48
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#48
I've been thinking about going to the O'Neils in town tonight, but I'm afraid it might be too cliched.

Meh.. there's always O'Briens.
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alocin
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#49
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#49
My contribution to St Patrick's Day is going to be having a jacket potato for lunch shortly! Can't stand Guinness.
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Howard
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#50
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#50
(Original post by jammyd)
70 out of 290 million Americans claim Irish ancestry.
A typical American claims to be Romanian,Dutch,Irish,Scottish,Fr ench,Italian, and (just for good luck)Cherokee Indian
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Bigcnee
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#51
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#51
(Original post by alocin)
Can't stand Guinness.
Neither can I, but I'm going to take one for the team.
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Bigcnee
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#52
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(Original post by Howard)
A typical American claims to be Romanian,Dutch,Irish,Scottish,Fr ench,Italian, and (just for good luck)Cherokee Indian
The difference in this case - being that it is possible.
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winorloose
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#53
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#53
(Original post by Bigcnee)
St. George wasn't "very" English either.
St Patrick wasn't very Irish either: he was English

(Though don't tell a Paddy that today)
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Howard
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#54
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(Original post by Howard)
A typical American claims to be Romanian,Dutch,Irish,Scottish,Fr ench,Italian, and (just for good luck)Cherokee Indian
I also think that naval architecture and ship construction and technology must have been absolutely temendous way back when, since 50% of Americans I've spoken to claim to have derived from the Mayflower voyage.

Must have been one huge fuc*in boat!
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Howard
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#55
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(Original post by winorloose)
St Patrick wasn't very Irish either: he was English

(Though don't tell a Paddy that today)
Did you know that St.George is also the patron saint of Portugal?
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Bigcnee
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#56
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(Original post by winorloose)
St Patrick wasn't very Irish either: he was English

(Though don't tell a Paddy that today)
I wouldn't tell anyone that ever (unless you want to look like a fool), as it is untrue.

St. Patrick was born in Wales, and devoted much of his life to ridding Ireland of paganism. Hence the connection.

St. George was some random hero that England adopted as their Patron Saint. He is no real connection with England (as far as I have read).

P.S. I would appreciate you not using the term "Paddy", as it is meant as a derogatory term.
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....
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#57
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(Original post by Howard)
Did you know that St.George is also the patron saint of Portugal?
He is patron saint not only of England but also of Aragon, Catalonia, Georgia, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, Germany and Greece; and of Moscow, Istanbul, Genoa and Venice (second to St Mark). He’s also patron saint of soldiers, archers, cavalry and chivalry, farmers and field workers, riders and saddlers, and he helps those suffering from leprosy, plague and syphilis.

Back to Patrick now, I'm sure he's great too
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winorloose
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#58
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#58
(Original post by Bigcnee)
I wouldn't tell anyone that ever (unless you want to look like a fool), as it is untrue.

St. Patrick was born in Wales, and devoted much of his life to ridding Ireland of paganism. Hence the connection.

St. George was some random hero that England adopted as their Patron Saint. He is no real connection with England (as far as I have read).

P.S. I would appreciate you not using the term "Paddy", as it is meant as a derogatory term.
I had forgottern that Patrick was welsh. I remembered that he had been born on the mainland, assumed (never a good idea) that he was english.

I am aware of the entire Irish connection. I think that St George was adopted during the 100 years war by English soldiers: probably connected to his patronage of soldiers. I'm still not sure why England has a patron saint anyway: sainthood is a Catholic doctrine and not really supported by Protestantism (as far as I am aware).

The paddy reference was a joke, and not intended to be derogratry.
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Howard
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Bigcnee)
I wouldn't tell anyone that ever (unless you want to look like a fool), as it is untrue.

St. Patrick was born in Wales, and devoted much of his life to ridding Ireland of paganism. Hence the connection.

St. George was some random hero that England adopted as their Patron Saint. He is no real connection with England (as far as I have read).

P.S. I would appreciate you not using the term "Paddy", as it is meant as a derogatory term.
Are you sure he was born in Wales? I just read one article (catholic forum) that says he was born between 387-390 in Scotland (as Maewyn Succat) and died 461-464 at Saul, County Down, Ireland and another (Irish clans) that says

..........he was almost certainly not born in Ireland, but more likely England, or Brittany in France, about 387 AD. We get this information from his own 'Confessio' (Confession) or 'magnum opus' which tells us much about his life.

St.George was not "some random hero" either. Though little is really known of him it seems he was actually a Roman soldier who spent some time in England.

According to the apocryphal Acts of St George current in various versions in the Eastern Church from the fifth century, George held the rank of tribune in the Roman army and was beheaded by Diocletian for protesting against the Emperor's persecution of Christians. George rapidly became venerated throughout Christendom as an example of bravery in defence of the poor and the defenceless and of the Christian faith.

George was probably first made well known in England by Arculpus and Adamnan in the early eighth century and the Acts of St George, recounted his visits to Caerleon and Glastonbury while on service in England.

So, I think there's more of a real connection between England and St.George than your "random hero" idea would suggest.
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alocin
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#60
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St Patrick was born in Wales and kidnapped as a teenager, sold into slavery and then shipped to Ireland.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/ne...p?story=502100
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