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    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
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    Do what your hearts telling you.

    You seem to have doubts about Medicine, in that case.. don't do it.

    Or else..try it for a few months? Don't like it then drop out

    Job done.
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    You don't have to be a doctor after you graduate, a lot of my friends off to study medicine would prefer to go into medical research than become doctors. A medicine degree opens a lot of doors, there is a wide variety of options. If you wanted to, you could go on to do another degree in Psychology or English. If you withdrew your application, will you be able to find a constructive use for your time during your gap year?
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    Watch and listen.

    Message me after.
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    For a second just think of medicine as a normal career, dont get too pulled into it. You need to study and be working a job that your passionate about. Get work exp in engish and pscyhology and maybe that will help you decide.
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    (Original post by Acruzen)
    You don't have to be a doctor after you graduate, a lot of my friends off to study medicine would prefer to go into medical research than become doctors. A medicine degree opens a lot of doors, there is a wide variety of options. If you wanted to, you could go on to do another degree in Psychology or English. If you withdrew your application, will you be able to find a constructive use for your time during your gap year?
    yes i'd love to really get an experience of the working world, find a job, work, travel with my friends who are also taking gap years. medical research doesn't appeal to me at all, i wanted to help people directly, but the huge scientific content and gruelling training is enough for me to not want to do this anymore. it's funny how people like me get caught up in a medicine application, and don't ever have the time to think about these sorts of important things
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    (Original post by blank_smile)
    For a second just think of medicine as a normal career, dont get too pulled into it. You need to study and be working a job that your passionate about. Get work exp in engish and pscyhology and maybe that will help you decide.
    the thing is, i have just about a month to decide.... i have researched both a lot, i enjoy the content of the degrees, i enjoy the freedom of choice of career path
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    the thing is, i have just about a month to decide.... i have researched both a lot, i enjoy the content of the degrees, i enjoy the freedom of choice of career path
    Its amazing you got 2 offers and you're sitting on the fence about doing medicine :P
    I would go for whatever makes you happy. What grades did you get in the january exams? For medicine I think you need AAA
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    (Original post by Gulzar)
    Its amazing you got 2 offers and you're sitting on the fence about doing medicine :P
    I would go for whatever makes you happy. What grades did you get in the january exams? For medicine I think you need AAA
    i know i wish i could give them to people who still want to do it and don't have any offers. i got all A's, predicted A*A*AA so i think i should be okay, hopefully
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    i know i wish i could give them to people who still want to do it and don't have any offers. i got all A's, predicted A*A*AA so i think i should be okay, hopefully
    Thats great
    I really think you should go for it! Its a one chance opportunity...but in the end its your decision
    I'm merely offering an opinion :P
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    I'll tell you something. If the people who interviewed you did not think of you of worthy of being a candidate suitable to study medicine, they would have never made you an offer.

    However, if you don't feel up for it, maybe its better you do something you're more comfortable doing. You're right about the medicine stress, it's a lot and sometimes becomes too much to handle and that's something a lot of people are unaware at the time A'levels.

    Do you have career counselor or someone like that in school you could discuss further? Maybe try talking about it to your friends (not to those who want to medicine though )
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    (Original post by upthegunners)
    Watch and listen.

    Message me after.
    EVERYONE should watch this
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    (Original post by bluemax)
    I'll tell you something. If the people who interviewed you did not think of you of worthy of being a candidate suitable to study medicine, they would have never made you an offer.

    However, if you don't feel up for it, maybe its better you do something you're more comfortable doing. You're right about the medicine stress, it's a lot and sometimes becomes too much to handle and that's something a lot of people are unaware at the time A'levels.

    Do you have career counselor or someone like that in school you could discuss further? Maybe try talking about it to your friends (not to those who want to medicine though )
    thanks for the advice
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    The vast majority of great company founders did not do it for the money... They did it because they BELIEVED in what they were doing and they were PASSIONATE about what they were doing. Ask Henry Ford why he started Ford and he will say because he wanted everybody to afford a car... or why did Steve Jobs start Apple? because he wanted individuals to have the same power as corporations... why did Mark Zuckerberg create Facebook? He wanted people to connect as much as possible... never money tho
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    What about doing the degree but specializing and ultimately qualifying as a psychiatrist? Then you can maintain and develop your interest in psychology, while still helping people. Also, you'll be able to do more than a psychologist can.

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    hey
    i would stick with it you've got the offer so why don't you go for it, you never know you may like it when you start your degree. M aybe you consider going to pyschnology after wards and become psychiatrist, it will take a lot effort and you working flat out but it wil be worth it. go for it

    good luck with your decision!
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    That was nicely written. I was going though the same dilemma as you but ultimately, i didn't end up getting medicine so it made me firm my neuroscience offer which I'm just as happy with.
    If I do get medicine here in Ireland though, then i'll take it!
    My advice would be to go with your heart. Even if you have a little interest in medicine, it wouldnt hurt to give it a go. You might really enjoy it!
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more.
    You are not wrong that medicine is an enormous time commitment and will affect your lifestyle (relative to other people your age) for at least a number of years.

    That said, if it is a priority, medical specialties which have a more "balanced" lifestyle are definitely available. Psychiatry, for example, would be one of these. Speaking of which, if you are interested in psychology - there is plenty of this to be had in medicine. Psychiatry is a very rewarding specialty which perhaps you should look into, a medical degree is the only way to access a career as a Psychiatrist. Whilst at med school you will have to study everything else as well, but there is plenty of opportunity to explore psychiatry/psychological matters as well, in some depth, and these are certainly very relevant to almost all medical specialties.

    Definitely don't let "not enough psychology" put you off medicine. Psychology affects every single patient, and the doctor too.


    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.
    Medicine does offer access to a range of careers! Just they're all medical! But there is a huge range in medicine, truly, if you do go on to study medicine, you'll probably spend half your time (certainly as you near the end) wondering how on earth you'll decide between all of the career options.

    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    If you really think medicine isn't for you, of course you shouldn't take the offer, for your own sake! I think you need to investigate medicine as a career a little further though. It's not something you'd want to "let go of" if it turns out later that it's what you want to do. Pursuing medicine later on as a graduate is an option but remember that it can be financially difficult, and might mean juggling junior/training years alongside more adult priorities (family, mortgage) than others have to deal with.
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    In my opinion, the problem is the level of motivation and ambition between you and your peers who have applied for medicine, as a result has made you doubt about your decision to take medicine as a career.
    I think that if you have done work experience and have decided for yourself, dispite the fact that you think you are not passinate enough that you enjoy medicine, encouraging and promoting healthcare to others and enjoy science and like adapting to constantly changing medical envrioment. Then you should presue with the offer nevertheless.

    Besides, if you go to imperial, how about doing an intercalated degree in anything other then medicine, I don't know however the options available in that but it gives you something extra.

    Then again, if you feel for yourself that your interest lies more in other field than medicine then I would strongly advice you not to take the offer.

    Good luck!
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    I've been in your situation, if you want, you can PM me and I'll tell you how I got around it and decided what to do (it's kind of a long story).

    To put it in a few sentences, you will get cold feet about any decision you make, that's normal, it's hard not to think about the other options you had and what would have happened if you took another path. You do have to make sure you picked your chosen career for reasons that will still matter to you. What do you want in life?
 
 
 
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