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    I'm currently doing AS maths, further maths, physics, ICT and chemistry and I'm considering switching 6th forms as my school can't provide A2 physics and I'd like to do A2 maths, further maths and physics next year for an engineering course at university.

    Can someone be kind enough to help assess the pros and cons of this move and give some advice on what to do please?

    (I've found a college that's on the same exam boards as my current 6th form for those subjects so that's not an issue)
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    Though not entirely the same, I did a resit year for my A-levels and found it boring as hell. This was mainly because I didn't know the people in the year below, so it was a bit awkward to begin with. If you know people in the other college then this might not be as much of a problem.

    I don't see why a university would object to it, but it would still be worth contacting a couple for their take on it. Physics isn't always required, though some universities will ask for applied modules in mechanics to offered as part of the maths course - That said, if you're doing further maths, I'd assume you're looking to the higher rated universities where it may be required. Plus, you'd only have two A-levels if they didn't want the physics so you'd have to carry on one of the other things.

    The other option, depending on how you feel about it, is self-study for the physics. The college should still be able to provide papers for this (I think you'd go in as an external candidate if it's a course not typically offered) and you wouldn't have to move anywhere. It depends how you feel about the physics and if you could handle it by yourself. Do you need it to be taught? The only consideration would be the practical exam if your exam board requires this. I think most do though, it would just be the same as the AS practical but for A2. Still, I don't see why a teacher would be unable to assess that exam if they're doing it for the AS students.


    In short: Contact the universities, just get their verdict. If you feel capable of teaching yourself the course, then ask the college about the exams. If you don't feel happy about that, then switch college.
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    I think a move would be the best in that case, however...

    Who'd write your reference?
    Would you be happy there?
    Would you get the grades you're expecting there?
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    Though not entirely the same, I did a resit year for my A-levels and found it boring as hell. This was mainly because I didn't know the people in the year below, so it was a bit awkward to begin with. If you know people in the other college then this might not be as much of a problem.

    I don't see why a university would object to it, but it would still be worth contacting a couple for their take on it. Physics isn't always required, though some universities will ask for applied modules in mechanics to offered as part of the maths course - That said, if you're doing further maths, I'd assume you're looking to the higher rated universities where it may be required. Plus, you'd only have two A-levels if they didn't want the physics so you'd have to carry on one of the other things.

    The other option, depending on how you feel about it, is self-study for the physics. The college should still be able to provide papers for this (I think you'd go in as an external candidate if it's a course not typically offered) and you wouldn't have to move anywhere. It depends how you feel about the physics and if you could handle it by yourself. Do you need it to be taught? The only consideration would be the practical exam if your exam board requires this. I think most do though, it would just be the same as the AS practical but for A2. Still, I don't see why a teacher would be unable to assess that exam if they're doing it for the AS students.


    In short: Contact the universities, just get their verdict. If you feel capable of teaching yourself the course, then ask the college about the exams. If you don't feel happy about that, then switch college.
    I think that adjusting to the new environment shouldn't be a problem for me and I do think self studying physics would be quite difficult for me so I think it 90% likely that I'll switch colleges. Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    I think a move would be the best in that case, however...

    Who'd write your reference?
    Would you be happy there?
    Would you get the grades you're expecting there?
    That's what I was talking to my parents about so I'll have to ask the college on the open day on how they'll write a reference for me. Hopefully the universities that I apply for can give me an extended deadline for the reference.

    I'd be a lot more happier at the college compared to my current 6th form because most of my friends from year 11 have left and I think that 60-70% of a student's grade comes from their own effort rather than the standard of the institute so it shouldn't be a problem (my current 6th form isn't that good anyway).

    Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by lioneln96)
    That's what I was talking to my parents about so I'll have to ask the college on the open day on how they'll write a reference for me. Hopefully the universities that I apply for can give me an extended deadline for the reference.

    I'd be a lot more happier at the college compared to my current 6th form because most of my friends from year 11 have left and I think that 60-70% of a student's grade comes from their own effort rather than the standard of the institute so it shouldn't be a problem (my current 6th form isn't that good anyway).

    Thanks for the advice!
    Well then I say a move is best!

    Best of luck
 
 
 
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