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    Hello, at the moment I am doing my AQA GCSE statistics coursework with the question 'where is unemployment greater?'. One of my hypotheses is ' the lower the NVQ4 rate in an area, the greater the rate of unemployment' and I want to do two histograms for it. Firstly, I have 50 areas which I would split into the top 25 with the higher NVQ4 rates and bottom 25 with the lower NVQ4 rates. I would then find their corresponding unemployment rates and draw a histogram for each one. Using this, I would find the quartiles and compare the unemployment rates for the histogram with the higher NVQ4 rates and the lower NVQ4 rates. I was wondering if anyone could tell me whether this would work/is a good idea or suggest alternatives to do histograms as I only have one other higher level graph and I would really like to do a histogram.
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    Hi, i'm doing the same coursework and my hypothesis relates the distance from Manchester but i don't think I can do a histogram because i don't see how that could help with my hypothesis? i'm really stuck so if you could tell me what a histogram shows to help with this.
    if you could help i'd be very grateful!
    Also with your Hypothesis (i'm not entirely sure) but try using a scatter graph because although it's very easy it's also a higher level graph, you could also draw a cumulative frequency diagram and you can even do a grouped frequency table
    hope this helped!
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    Thank you for the suggestions and I've already done the scatter graph , I think I will also include a cumulative frequency diagram and grouped frequency table too I'm not really sure about the histograms either and to be honest I'm not sure if I should do it anymore. However for your hypothesis, maybe you could do sort of what I was planning to do where you find the 50% of places which are furthest away from Manchester and 50% of places which are closest to Manchester and then find their corresponding unemployment rates. Using these unemployment rates you could draw separate histograms from which you could find the quartiles and IQR etc. and then compare the two. Although I suggest before you try it maybe check with someone else
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    (Original post by SaraB_)
    Thank you for the suggestions and I've already done the scatter graph , I think I will also include a cumulative frequency diagram and grouped frequency table too I'm not really sure about the histograms either and to be honest I'm not sure if I should do it anymore. However for your hypothesis, maybe you could do sort of what I was planning to do where you find the 50% of places which are furthest away from Manchester and 50% of places which are closest to Manchester and then find their corresponding unemployment rates. Using these unemployment rates you could draw separate histograms from which you could find the quartiles and IQR etc. and then compare the two. Although I suggest before you try it maybe check with someone else
    Why did you get this peculiar idea that histograms are the best way to find quartiles?
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    Why did you get this peculiar idea that histograms are the best way to find quartiles?
    I know I could use a cumulative frequency diagram instead but I'm planning to do that for my other hypothesis. Also, I thought the histograms would be good because I can compare their skewness. I thought it was ok to use histograms for quartiles
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    (Original post by SaraB_)
    I know I could use a cumulative frequency diagram instead but I'm planning to do that for my other hypothesis. Also, I thought the histograms would be good because I can compare their skewness. I thought it was ok to use histograms for quartiles
    You are trying to use every possible type of diagram you can think of because you (mistakenly) think it will result in higher marks. The truth is examiners absolutely detest this approach. They want you to select the most appropriate representation and justify your choice.
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    (Original post by Mr M)
    You are trying to use every possible type of diagram you can think of because you (mistakenly) think it will result in higher marks. The truth is examiners absolutely detest this approach. They want you to select the most appropriate representation and justify your choice.
    Would 3/4 well interpreted, well justified graphs be enough then?
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    Wouldn't a box plot suite your work?
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    (Original post by zed963)
    Wouldn't a box plot suit your work?
    Certainly good for comparing quartiles and skewness.
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    (Original post by zed963)
    Wouldn't a box plot suite your work?
    Actually yeah , hadn't thought of that thanks
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    (Original post by SaraB_)
    Thank you for the suggestions and I've already done the scatter graph , I think I will also include a cumulative frequency diagram and grouped frequency table too I'm not really sure about the histograms either and to be honest I'm not sure if I should do it anymore. However for your hypothesis, maybe you could do sort of what I was planning to do where you find the 50% of places which are furthest away from Manchester and 50% of places which are closest to Manchester and then find their corresponding unemployment rates. Using these unemployment rates you could draw separate histograms from which you could find the quartiles and IQR etc. and then compare the two. Although I suggest before you try it maybe check with someone else
    Thanks yeah i'll try it out and see if it works, thanks for your help
 
 
 
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