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    Ok, so I'm a bit unsure as to what subject I should drop. Some of you may suggest to keep all 4 if that's the case, but I'm already going to be taking up Further Maths AS next year (I think it will be quite beneficial when applying to economic courses and I enjoy maths anyway).

    I'm currently taking:
    Maths (with stats)
    Economics
    Computing
    Politics


    I've highlighted politics and computing because these are the two I cannot choose between.




    The reasons I've found to keep politics:
    • Quite Interesting.
    • Achieved 94% UMS in January exams, though I was very surprised by this.
    • More relevance to economics than computing?
    • More respected than computing? Thoughts on this??
    • Show universities that I'm capable of writing essays? (Though I will, hopefully, be taking the EPQ)
    • Apparently, next year is just a repeat of everything this year, but it's to do with the United States instead. So the theory would already be learnt from this year, no?


    The reasons I've found to get rid of it:
    • Takes up SO much time to revise. Out of everything I take, I have to revise the most for politics. With the extra pressure of FM and the scrapping of January exams, I don't know if I'll cope.
    • Really don't like the exam style of having to write absolutely loads (the big questions being a 25 marker and a 40 marker) in so little time.
    • Although it is quite interest, some aspects are enough to send me to sleep (quite literally - this did happen in class once, and I was quite embarrassed to say the least).
    • Surely economics (seeing as A2 involves big written questions) and the EPQ (that I'll hopefully be doing) will show that I have essay writing skills.






    Reasons I've found to keep computing:
    • I find the programming aspect of it pretty easy.
    • It's basically reading the textbook and answering questions.
    • The last part of A2 is a programming project, which linking in with my first point, shouldn't be too much difficulty.
    • Much less stress than with politics.
    • Perhaps it's the closest thing to a science (other than social sciences) I'll get with my options.
    • Perhaps shows problem solving capabilities. Although maths and FM would show this wouldn't it?


    Reasons I've found to get rid of computing:
    • I'm bored most of the time.
    • Reading the book and having to just regurgitate what's in there can be soul soul-destroying boring.
    • Not sure how highly universities think of it... For some reason, politics seems as though the more desirable option as it's more 'traditional', is it not?
    • I achieved 85% UMS in this, compared to 94% in politics.





    Sorry for the wall of text, I just want to make my perspective on matters clear.

    TL;DR Don't know whether to drop Politics or Computing, given my current options and that I wish to study economics (or possibly even economics with maths depending on my grade), at university.
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    get rid of computing, besides politics goes well with economics. It enhances your essay writing skills.
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    Besides, politics will only help you with your EPQ. I did my EPQ on economics and audit provisions because I did Math-sey subjects it was difficult. My essay based subjects helped me greatly, you will also feel that in university with all the theses you'll be writing. What do you wish to do at university? If you wish to apply for econ related, by the sounds of it you do -- drop computing. You will be more aware of things such as, debt ceiling, fiscal cliff which are econ and politics related. You will have a good balance of Maths (with Maths and Further Maths) and essays (with Politics and Econ)

    Good luck
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    (Original post by NidaJaffri)
    Besides, politics will only help you with your EPQ. I did my EPQ on economics and audit provisions because I did Math-sey subjects it was difficult. My essay based subjects helped me greatly, you will also feel that in university with all the theses you'll be writing. What do you wish to do at university? If you wish to apply for econ related, by the sounds of it you do -- drop computing. You will be more aware of things such as, debt ceiling, fiscal cliff which are econ and politics related. You will have a good balance of Maths (with Maths and Further Maths) and essays (with Politics and Econ)

    Good luck
    Thanks.
    Yeah (as stated in the OP ) I am hoping to study Economics at university. Depending on my maths grade and how I find FM, I'm also considering something such as Economics with Maths... however I'm not too sure yet. I'm also considering actuarial science, however, I've recently been put off by how limited the possible careers are, as opposed to what's possible with an economics degree.
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    (Original post by TheMan100)
    Thanks.
    Yeah (as stated in the OP ) I am hoping to study Economics at university. Depending on my maths grade and how I find FM, I'm also considering something such as Economics with Maths... however I'm not too sure yet. I'm also considering actuarial science, however, I've recently been put off by how limited the possible careers are, as opposed to what's possible with an economics degree.
    I think the only thing computing can help you with is D1 unit in Further Maths - if your school does it. If you want to start a business in programming or something, then don't drop computing obvi. But if you just want to do econ and maths dw about it.
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    (Original post by NidaJaffri)
    I think the only thing computing can help you with is D1 unit in Further Maths - if your school does it. If you want to start a business in programming or something, then don't drop computing obvi. But if you just want to do econ and maths dw about it.
    Yeah my Sixth Form does teach D1. I have no ambition to program. The only reason I'm really considering to keep computing is because it'll be far less stressful to revise for. But if getting rid of it and keeping politics will be more beneficial, then I'll go down that route.
 
 
 
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