fuze-mo25
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Hi,

I am currently holding offers to study Aerospace engineering but i'm not sure whether to go ahead and study it or to switch to mechanical engineering. The reason for this is most of the jobs in the aerospace field you can apply for with a mechanical Eng degree. I've been having so much doubt that I haven't even chosen my firm and insurance on ucas. Personally one of the most important feature of getting a degree is employability and mechanical enginering seems so much broader and has more jobs.

So basically the question is can any put there 2 cents in whether i should just stick with aerospace or change to mechanical???
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fuze-mo25
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(Original post by a10)
if your heart is with mechanical then swap course, mechanical gives you more options since its broader and as you mentioned you can still work for aerospace companies. I have a love for aerospace too but i chose mechanical just for variety instead of choosing aerospace which seemed a little bit more specialized towards aircraft and cars. I also wasn't 100% sure if i wanted to work in aviation so thats another reason why i chose mechanical eng but i am going to try and do some aero related modules and maybe some environmental modules as i can as i would like to work for airbus or rolls royce one day or maybe automotive companies like Jaguar etc. if im lucky that is....
I'm in the same position as you man. I really want a career in aviation but who knows if i'll feel the same in 4 years time.
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a10
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(Original post by fuze-mo25)
I'm in the same position as you man. I really want a career in aviation but who knows if i'll feel the same in 4 years time.
I've picked mechanical and im 100% happy with my choice the modules look really interesting and broad its going to be fun! Can't wait for September
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SillyEddy
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The courses, depending on which university and the specifics, are usually very similar. There is likely to be a more focused role on aerospace applications in aerospace, but the core fundamental stuff will probably be the same between the two degrees. In lectures (I do mechanical), I sit with those doing automotive/motorsport/aerospace technology. The guys doing automotive engineering have exactly the same modules as we do, except a handful over the 3 years are the "vehicle version" of what we're doing. Someone who started on motorsport could potentially switch to mechanical because they're so similar.

A buddy of mine did motorsport and motorcycle engineering and his graduate position is a largely mechanical one working on industrial machinery. There is room for movement.

So yeah, many employers will appreciate that you know your stuff as an "engineer" and the discipline isn't always that important. I prefer the idea of slightly broader learning from mechanical, but I want to do an MSc in aerospace afterwards just to get that final bit of specialism.

That said, my first ever report was on material selections for high pressure jet engine turbine blades, so it's not as if you'll be totally separated from aviation if you go for mechanical.


If you're focused on working in aerospace, then go for aero. If you think you'd like a bit of variety then go for mechanical. I can't think of any universal reasons why either degree would stop you from working in any of the "mechanical" type jobs out there. Mechanical engineering may just be that little bit broader though. Hence why I want to specialise in the postgraduate degree afterwards. Eventually experience will take over anyway and I can't see why you'd be tied down into any industry.
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strategist
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I am happy that I swapped because I realise my true passion is in Mechanical. But that is different for each individual. Make sure you are really, really interested in Aerospace because I heard that it is really tough.
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a10
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(Original post by strategist)
I am happy that I swapped because I realise my true passion is in Mechanical. But that is different for each individual. Make sure you are really, really interested in Aerospace because I heard that it is really tough.
Tbh all the main engineering disciplines will be tough.
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fuze-mo25
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(Original post by strategist)
I am happy that I swapped because I realise my true passion is in Mechanical. But that is different for each individual. Make sure you are really, really interested in Aerospace because I heard that it is really tough.
yh i'm not worried about how tough it is , more so how worthwhile it is. what year are you in? how are you finding mechanical? and how do the job prospects look???

sorry with all the questions im just so confused
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physicso
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(Original post by SillyEddy)
The courses, depending on which university and the specifics, are usually very similar. There is likely to be a more focused role on aerospace applications in aerospace, but the core fundamental stuff will probably be the same between the two degrees. In lectures (I do mechanical), I sit with those doing automotive/motorsport/aerospace technology. The guys doing automotive engineering have exactly the same modules as we do, except a handful over the 3 years are the "vehicle version" of what we're doing. Someone who started on motorsport could potentially switch to mechanical because they're so similar.

A buddy of mine did motorsport and motorcycle engineering and his graduate position is a largely mechanical one working on industrial machinery. There is room for movement.

So yeah, many employers will appreciate that you know your stuff as an "engineer" and the discipline isn't always that important. I prefer the idea of slightly broader learning from mechanical, but I want to do an MSc in aerospace afterwards just to get that final bit of specialism.

That said, my first ever report was on material selections for high pressure jet engine turbine blades, so it's not as if you'll be totally separated from aviation if you go for mechanical.


If you're focused on working in aerospace, then go for aero. If you think you'd like a bit of variety then go for mechanical. I can't think of any universal reasons why either degree would stop you from working in any of the "mechanical" type jobs out there. Mechanical engineering may just be that little bit broader though. Hence why I want to specialise in the postgraduate degree afterwards. Eventually experience will take over anyway and I can't see why you'd be tied down into any industry.
Do you know if you could do any one these jobs with a Physics masters degree?
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a10
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(Original post by physicso)
Do you know if you could do any one these jobs with a Physics masters degree?
I don't think so, you wouldn't be able to do the "proper" engineering jobs...the ones with physics degrees tend to do the more research type jobs but the actual designs/specifications/maintenance etc are done by engineers who did engineering degrees.
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0le
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(Original post by strategist)
I am happy that I swapped because I realise my true passion is in Mechanical. But that is different for each individual. Make sure you are really, really interested in Aerospace because I heard that it is really tough.

Many people "like" aircraft in the same manner they "like" cars. You don't really need a passion, just don't hate aircraft because obviously the course is geared towards it.


(Original post by fuze-mo25)
yh i'm not worried about how tough it is , more so how worthwhile it is. what year are you in? how are you finding mechanical? and how do the job prospects look???

sorry with all the questions im just so confused

Largely, any engineering jobs will always appreciate mechanical engineers and aeronautical engineers. There are exceptions of course, but generally speaking, when an employer quotes "mechanical engineers" that means "aeronautical" as well. The two courses though, are definitely different and that is why there are still a few jobs that specifically require aeronautical engineering (not many granted but nonetheless).

You will learn about the jet engine, aerodynamics of a wing (complicated and still not understood today), CFD and flight dynamics (six DOF highly non-linear systems) in aeronautical engineering to a level that you probably won't gain in Mechanical.
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Hussnainmalik
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So 6 years later how are you all doing lol.
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