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    When studying from the book when making notes is there any point copying formulas as nothing is been learned? Is it best to create questions to test myself to see if I still know it after reading it? What should I make notes on?
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    When studying from the book when making notes is there any point copying formulas as nothing is been learned? Is it best to create questions to test myself to see if I still know it after reading it? What should I make notes on?
    IMO just do as much practice on questions as possible. The more, the better.
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    I do mini notes as I'm working through questions, like saying it is inextensible therefore the magnitude of the acceleration is the same under a bullet point, so that if I forgot it, I can look back in my book and find out how to solve a similar problem etc. It works well for Statistics mostly, as there's a lot to remember. But don't do flashcards or anything like that, practice is better than note taking
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    Dem past papers is where its at.
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    I never made notes for maths. You just need to understand the concept and apply it in different situations. Formulas are generally at the front of the exam but some aren't.
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    When studying from the book when making notes is there any point copying formulas as nothing is been learned? Is it best to create questions to test myself to see if I still know it after reading it? What should I make notes on?
    I don't know anyone who makes notes for maths except maybe for the applications units and I can't see the logic of making up your own questions that you don't have the answers to, that may not even have valid solutions and don't relate to what your examiner will ask for. You get better at maths by doing maths. Do the questions in your text book and do past papers. Make a list of key formulae you use so you can look them up quickly if you need to.

    If you are scoring highly in your examiners past papers you could try the more challenging Solomon papers or papers from another examiner that may ask things a little differently.
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    IMO just do as much practice on questions as possible. The more, the better.
    (Original post by Robbie242)
    I do mini notes as I'm working through questions, like saying it is inextensible therefore the magnitude of the acceleration is the same under a bullet point, so that if I forgot it, I can look back in my book and find out how to solve a similar problem etc. It works well for Statistics mostly, as there's a lot to remember. But don't do flashcards or anything like that, practice is better than note taking
    (Original post by Lunch_Box)
    Dem past papers is where its at.
    (Original post by zed963)
    I never made notes for maths. You just need to understand the concept and apply it in different situations. Formulas are generally at the front of the exam but some aren't.
    (Original post by gdunne42)
    I don't know anyone who makes notes for maths except maybe for the applications units and I can't see the logic of making up your own questions that you don't have the answers to, that may not even have valid solutions and don't relate to what your examiner will ask for. You get better at maths by doing maths. Do the questions in your text book and do past papers. Make a list of key formulae you use so you can look them up quickly if you need to.

    If you are scoring highly in your examiners past papers you could try the more challenging Solomon papers or papers from another examiner that may ask things a little differently.
    Well how come here the advice is to focus on concepts. It seemed like a good idea to master the concepts then you will realise there are actually only a few types of problems. Or have I misunderstood the point and questions are important?

    The reason I ask is I have six modules of further maths and I thought if I just make notes on the important concepts and try understand them I will be able to answer any question that comes my way.

    Also what is the point in lecture notes if only exercises are important? (playing devils advocate )
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Well how come here the advice is to focus on concepts. It seemed like a good idea to master the concepts then you will realise there are actually only a few types of problems. Or have I misunderstood the point and questions are important?

    The reason I ask is I have six modules of further maths and I thought if I just make notes on the important concepts and try understand them I will be able to answer any question that comes my way.

    Also what is the point in lecture notes if they are bad?
    I'm sure I said concepts in my previous post.
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Well how come here the advice is to focus on concepts. It seemed like a good idea to master the concepts then you will realise there are actually only a few types of problems. Or have I misunderstood the point and questions are important?

    The reason I ask is I have six modules of further maths and I thought if I just make notes on the important concepts and try understand them I will be able to answer any question that comes my way.

    Also what is the point in lecture notes if they are bad?
    Why are you trying to apply advice from the University of Houston to your entirely different situation?!
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Well how come here the advice is to focus on concepts. It seemed like a good idea to master the concepts then you will realise there are actually only a few types of problems. Or have I misunderstood the point and questions are important?

    The reason I ask is I have six modules of further maths and I thought if I just make notes on the important concepts and try understand them I will be able to answer any question that comes my way.

    Also what is the point in lecture notes if only exercises are important? (playing devils advocate )
    Exercises are a way of testing your understanding and sometimes it can develop it further. Lecture notes may help/may not. Exercises are definitely important though, don't underestimate them.
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Well how come here the advice is to focus on concepts. It seemed like a good idea to master the concepts then you will realise there are actually only a few types of problems. Or have I misunderstood the point and questions are important?

    The reason I ask is I have six modules of further maths and I thought if I just make notes on the important concepts and try understand them I will be able to answer any question that comes my way.

    Also what is the point in lecture notes if only exercises are important? (playing devils advocate )
    Because everyone's advice is different, but generally for maths you get better with practice, If I just wrote the mechanics textbook in my own words, I'm treating maths as if it were history or economics, which just doesn't feel right to me and would burn me out even more. When I start a chapter I copy the bullet points edexcel say and anything important then give the questions a go (and referring back to the examples if stuck)
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    (Original post by zed963)
    I'm sure I said concepts in my previous post.
    Oh yeah but you said you didn't make notes. If you get what I mean. Or was the textbook enough? Did you not write anything in your own words?
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Because everyone's advice is different, but generally for maths you get better with practice, If I just wrote the mechanics textbook in my own words, I'm treating maths as if it were history or economics, which just doesn't feel right to me and would burn me out even more. When I start a chapter I copy the bullet points edexcel say and anything important then give the questions a go (and referring back to the examples if stuck)
    I agree and it was my old method to be honest and writing notes is killing me, which is why I preferred maths. Do you have any idea how I can bang through these textbooks? There are six and six weeks?
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    Oh yeah but you said you didn't make notes. If you get what I mean. Or was the textbook enough? Did you not write anything in your own words?
    I was a GCSE candidate so I can't say much about A-levels but I didn't need notes because I just remembered everything and understood nearly everything.
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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    I agree and it was my old method to be honest and writing notes is killing me, which is why I preferred maths. Do you have any idea how I can bang through these textbooks? There are six and six weeks?
    Just do the exercises, tackle tough questions, get started on papers. But with maths overtime its generally better to start earlier
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    (Original post by zed963)
    I was a GCSE candidate so I can't say much about A-levels but I didn't need notes because I just remembered everything and understood nearly everything.
    GCSE is a walk in the park compared to A-level


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    (Original post by Jackabc)
    When studying from the book when making notes is there any point copying formulas as nothing is been learned? Is it best to create questions to test myself to see if I still know it after reading it? What should I make notes on?
    Just focus on doing past papers.
    There are a few formulas you need to learn, but make sure you check the formula sheet you get given in the exams, otherwise you will learn formulas you don't need to learn as they are given to you


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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Just do the exercises, tackle tough questions, get started on papers. But with maths overtime its generally better to start earlier
    I agree really, I was just wondering how to improve my methods as I was reading that at Uni you don't get much examples or exercises simply because for like the integration by parts formula you just need to realise when to use it and make substitutions. So I thought I wonder if there is a way I can save time for a-levels by doing that.
 
 
 
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