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    I really enjoy biology but if i were to study it at degree level what can i do after
    my issue is what careers can you get from a degree in biology other than teaching or research maybe this is me being ignorant to what a biology degree can do?
    But im under the impression you have to do a specific degree to get in a specific field. For example to be a biotechnologist you must study biotechnology to be a biomedical scientist you must study biomed etc
    any help
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    Go on LinkedIn, search your course and university and stalk them - see what they are currently doing etc


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    (Original post by W00p)
    I really enjoy biology but if i were to study it at degree level what can i do after
    my issue is what careers can you get from a degree in biology other than teaching or research maybe this is me being ignorant to what a biology degree can do?
    But im under the impression you have to do a specific degree to get in a specific field. For example to be a biotechnologist you must study biotechnology to be a biomedical scientist you must study biomed etc
    any help
    I am having similar issues, our degrees are so broad that it is hard to find an employer that is specifically asking for that.
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    But im under the impression you have to do a specific degree to get in a specific field. For example to be a biotechnologist you must study biotechnology to be a biomedical scientist you must study biomed etc
    I doubt that's the case. Degree level content regardless of subject is still quite varied compared to specific research projects. So doing a more specialised degree only exposes you to a narrower range of topics, whereas doing a general degree gives you more time and experience to find out what, if any, specialisation you want to take up. The further down a path you go, the less relevant the degree syllabus will become, of course, as with anything else. Work experience from postgraduate degrees or otherwise will take center stage on job applications.

    The only scenario where it makes sense, I think, to go for a more specialised degree head first is if it covers specialised modules, and you've identified postgraduate degrees, internships, etc. which deal precisely with those areas. Then again, I think this advantage would be minimal compared to the disadvantage of specialising too soon.

    For example, I've got an internship mid-degree and have looked at the other interns' degrees - they are quite mixed e.g. biochemistry, biology, biomedicine, biotechnology, molecular biology, etc. (my degree is general).

    I also got a week's work experience in a specialised lab, which was quite specialised and contributed to my internship application being successful. The key is to keep a good "base" (grades and references) while gathering a variety of "toppings" (work experience, personal achievements, proof of dedication).

    As far as general jobs are concerned, I can't imagine the "transferable skills" (atrociously uninspired and depressing concept) gained from a STEM degree not going a long way. Except for the "menial" jobs where it would appear any education above and including GCSEs is seen as fatally disqualifying. They have an issue with academia, although you'd at least hope they'd realise basic education is hardly that. Excuse the rant.
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    I work in a planning environment team although I'm more planner than conservationist. Nature conservation is a good area to work in and degrees such as biology and ecology are fine for entry. Most jobs are in the public or voluntary sector and there's few graduate level jobs meaning that competition is fierce and salaries aren't great. But it's one of the easiest areas in science to get voluntary experience. You can offer your services to community conservation groups who will be glad to have you.


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