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    This is from my textbook: 'Nitrogen fixing bacteria such as Rhizobium also live inside the root nodules of plants such as peas, beans and clover, which are all members of the bean family. They have a mutualistic relationship with the plant; the bacteria provide the plant with fixed nitrogen and receive carbon compounds, such as glucose, in return.'

    Why does the plants give the bacteria carbon compounds? How has it adapted in order to do this?
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    Well technically the plant has no option, glucose is lipid soluble, so can diffuse into the cell without any interaction from the plant? Ie the bacterium just has to be in the same location as the glucose for it to be absorbed? The plant doesn't specifically send glucose to the bacterium.


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    (Original post by Jespy)
    Well technically the plant has no option, glucose is lipid soluble, so can diffuse into the cell without any interaction from the plant? Ie the bacterium just has to be in the same location as the glucose for it to be absorbed? The plant doesn't specifically send glucose to the bacterium.


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    So the bacterium just draws out the glucose it needs?
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    (Original post by celina10)
    So the bacterium just draws out the glucose it needs?
    basically. it forms an equilibrium with the glucose on outside of the cell


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    That's a bit strange, for I read once that bacteria gets a carbohydrate digesting enzyme from the plant in a mutualistic relationship. The bacteria in turn provides mineral ions.
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    (Original post by Dynamo123)
    That's a bit strange, for I read once that bacteria gets a carbohydrate digesting enzyme from the plant in a mutualistic relationship. The bacteria in turn provides mineral ions.
    it does but what I'm saying is the cell doesn't say 'oh need 3ng glucose, here have some calcium' instead the glucose in the liquid surrounding the bacterium will enter the cell,

    in the same way things will leave the bacterium, hence mutually exclusive

    what level is this? gcse/a/undergrad?


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    (Original post by Jespy)
    it does but what I'm saying is the cell doesn't say 'oh need 3ng glucose, here have some calcium' instead the glucose in the liquid surrounding the bacterium will enter the cell,

    in the same way things will leave the bacterium, hence mutually exclusive

    what level is this? gcse/a/undergrad?


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    Okie dokie. :P
    It's A level
 
 
 
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