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Counselling: Have you ever Watch

  • View Poll Results: Have you ever had a form of counseling?
    Yes and it was beneficial
    16
    33.33%
    Yes but it didnt help
    21
    43.75%
    No but I'm considering it
    6
    12.50%
    No and I dont think its for me
    5
    10.42%

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    Have you ever had counseling?

    Anything counts from visiting relate to something more informal at school, college, uni or else where. Also for any reason like bullying, mental illness or difficulties at home.
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    (Original post by Noirla)
    Have you ever had counseling?

    Anything counts from visiting relate to something more informal at school, college, uni or else where. Also for any reason like bullying, mental illness or difficulties at home.
    Nope, not at all. My current Geography teacher (I'm the only one doing A-level Geo) says our lessons are like therapy as we talk about really really deep things :P
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    (Original post by Annuhlees)
    Nope, not at all. My current Geography teacher (I'm the only one doing A-level Geo) says our lessons are like therapy as we talk about really really deep things :P
    Deep as in personal or philosophical or...?
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    (Original post by Noirla)
    Deep as in personal or philosophical or...?
    Both as we both same the same upbringing with parents etc and we both get very emotional about the environment. She's the only person who truely understands me and where i'm coming from.
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    Yes, at school, college, NHS provided CBT and just finished my sessions at university. Combination of mental health issues, family issues and self image.
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    Since becoming a Peer Mentor a couple of years ago (a Peer Mentor at my school is a small group of students (there were 8/9 of us) who have some training, the idea being that the younger students will talk to you because you are their peers and less intimidating than teachers/ counsellors) I have seen how beneficial it can be - weights are lifted from you. Also, talking to my History teacher (who also does counselling on the side) showed me that it can help people of all ages with whatever they are facing. I didn't know much about it before, so felt indifferent.
    • #1
    #1

    I was referred but I was too scared to go
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    Yes; by both child and adult MH teams. Waste of time to be honest. Currently working with a psychologist using more of a mindfulness/psyhotherapy mash up technique, and it's working a lot better
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    In the middle of uni counselling and while I'm not entirely convinced of the long term effects of it, it has still been a help to actually talk about my difficulties to someone and identify exactly what problems I have and there was one technique involving imagery that I thought was particularly good for dealing with bullies and intimidating people.
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    I have had counselling a few times (as well as some other types of therapy, e.g. CBT, eye-movement therapy). I saw a counsellor with CAMHS when I was younger, I saw a school counsellor and I had bereavement counselling for a year before my mum died and for 7 months afterwards.

    I didn't find the school counsellor beneficial at all, and I don't think the CAMHS counselling helped me a huge amount. I don't particularly like 'just' talking, I prefer doing something more practical to change how I'm feeling.

    But the bereavement counselling (both before and after) was hugely beneficial, helped a huge huge amount. Somewhere that I could go and just talk about what was going on without 'bringing people down', or worrying about people judged, and I liked being able to just go there and talk about my mum as much as I liked.
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    (Original post by Liv1204)
    I have had counselling a few times (as well as some other types of therapy, e.g. CBT, eye-movement therapy). I saw a counsellor with CAMHS when I was younger, I saw a school counsellor and I had bereavement counselling for a year before my mum died and for 7 months afterwards.

    I didn't find the school counsellor beneficial at all, and I don't think the CAMHS counselling helped me a huge amount. I don't particularly like 'just' talking, I prefer doing something more practical to change how I'm feeling.

    But the bereavement counselling (both before and after) was hugely beneficial, helped a huge huge amount. Somewhere that I could go and just talk about what was going on without 'bringing people down', or worrying about people judged, and I liked being able to just go there and talk about my mum as much as I liked.

    Liv? This sounds scarily familiar, will PM you Hope you're doing well
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    I've recently attended a few sessions with my in school councillor, for mental health issues and to be honest most of the time I leave the room feeling a lot worse than when I entered.

    I get babied a lot and the ever famous "but many people your age feel this way but aren't considered depressed" it's like she thinks I've magically convinced my doctor I need medication ect. Waste of time in my opinion.


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    Yeah I've had counselling with CAMHS and at school for a couple of years because of depression, a panic disorder, self harm and a suicide attempt! But I'm so much better now and thinking about stopping the sessions!


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    • #2
    #2

    I had counselling when I was in Year 10 (yes I was a 'child', but I was trying to have an 'adult conversation' with her) over the things I was doing... I hated it. I thought that my counsellor was one of the most patronising people in the entire world. It was the typical adult response of when you tell them something and you actually need help and their response it 'yeah. okay. You're only young and ahh. You'll get over it'. I just refused to turn up after half the sessions. I was really looking forward to the first couple of sessions because I thought 'yeah, this person is going to really help me' after that it was 'I'd rather stay in this lesson. I hate this lesson and this teacher, but I'd rather be here than with her'. In my opinion it was a waste of time, however I've known others who have gained so much from it. I think it depends on what the counsellor's aims are and how willing they are to do it...
    • #3
    #3

    I went to counselling once when I was 18 because I'd been rejected after an interview at Oxford, was stressed about my exams and my mother was making me feel guilty about how much time I was spending with my boyfriend (which, looking back on it, wasn't even that much).

    I talked to the woman for about half an hour, realised that I was more intelligent than she was, accepted that I am not the sort of person who tells complete strangers about their personal life and made the decision to sort myself out on my own.

    So...the counselling itself didn't help, but it did make me realise that the only person who was going to fix things was me and that did help.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I was referred but I was too scared to go
    What scared you?
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    Considering it. I know I need it and it's the only way to sort my relationship issues out.
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    (Original post by Olie)
    there was one technique involving imagery that I thought was particularly good for dealing with bullies and intimidating people.
    Would you mind sharing this technique?
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    I ticked NO, but then I remembered that I had some help from victim support ... would that count
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Considering it. I know I need it and it's the only way to sort my relationship issues out.
    You sound pretty certain, how come you havent already tried it out?

    If you had already been approached with the opportunity to try it, would you have taken it?
 
 
 
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