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Is a ODP a nurse? watch

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    I want to become an ODP but is it a nurse like a theatre nurse and I am a boy and also what title would you get in front of your name?
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    (Original post by sully50sully)
    I want to become an ODP but is it a nurse like a theatre nurse and I am a boy and also what title would you get in front of your name?
    An ODP is not a nurse, they're an ODP and do an ODP course at uni. Have a look at NHS careers to find out more.


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    You stated you are male - why does this matter?
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    (Original post by Happy_Holidays)
    An ODP is not a nurse, they're an ODP and do an ODP course at uni. Have a look at NHS careers to find out more.


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    Yeah that's what I thought as well but when I search for ODP jobs on nhs jobs it usually comes up with Theatre nurse/ODP, why is that?
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    (Original post by sully50sully)
    Yeah that's what I thought as well but when I search for ODP jobs on nhs jobs it usually comes up with Theatre nurse/ODP, why is that?
    As far as I'm aware, a nurse is a band 5, an a practitioner is a band 4, but it can vary between different nhs trusts
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    ODPs start on band 5 and are registered HCPs. They are usually nurse / ODP online as either can apply. However a nurse will generally need experience and potentially extra courses before being able to apply for theatres and I believe there's certain jobs in theatres only odp's can do.




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    (Original post by Happy_Holidays)
    ODPs start on band 5 and are registered HCPs. They are usually nurse / ODP online as either can apply. However a nurse will generally need experience and potentially extra courses before being able to apply for theatres and I believe there's certain jobs in theatres only odp's can do.




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    Thanks that just cleared my head I thought I was going to do a female based job for a second and yes they do start on band 5 and progress to band 8 for management roles, thank you very much!
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    (Original post by sully50sully)
    Thanks that just cleared my head I thought I was going to do a female based job for a second and yes they do start on band 5 and progress to band 8 for management roles, thank you very much!
    'Female based' is an awkward term. Operating department practice (or theatre nursing, whatever you decide to call it), is an area of nursing amongst others that does tend to attract more men than elsewhere. However, it is perfectly possible that you will find yourself employed in an environment where you work on your own professional level with extremely few men and you will need to understand the positive and negative implications of that prior to entering the nursing profession.
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    Doesn't matter about "female based" - I know plenty of male nurses who are very successful
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    (Original post by thatonethere)
    Doesn't matter about "female based" - I know plenty of male nurses who are very successful
    from what I have understood from the NHS website is that it's not actually a nurse, a nurse/theatre nurse is VERY different from an ODP.
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    (Original post by sully50sully)
    from what I have understood from the NHS website is that it's not actually a nurse, a nurse/theatre nurse is VERY different from an ODP.
    Correct. An ODP will do a specialist degree to work in theaters and in some cases (and with experience) may work in other areas of the hospital, usually supporting an anesthetist. A theater nurse trains as a nurse and can then specialize in theaters. There's probably a lot more males in the ODP profession (in fact I think most ODPs I've met have been men) than nursing ratio wise but if you wanted more scope for progression or to move out of theaters then nursing may be better.
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    (Original post by Happy_Holidays)
    Correct. An ODP will do a specialist degree to work in theaters and in some cases (and with experience) may work in other areas of the hospital, usually supporting an anesthetist. A theater nurse trains as a nurse and can then specialize in theaters. There's probably a lot more males in the ODP profession (in fact I think most ODPs I've met have been men) than nursing ratio wise but if you wanted more scope for progression or to move out of theaters then nursing may be better.
    I would never be a nurse, I love theatre work, but I need to get work experience but I do not know where to get it, I asked my school but they said that they do not have time for me. So where can I do one? any suggetions?
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    You may be able to get general work experience but you would be very unlikely to get any in theatres. Your best bet is to get experience of working with people. That can be from anything such as working in a shop, being part of a youth group. Basically any area you can show your working it others. When they look at your application they will want to see that you understand the job and you can show how your experiences have shown of different skills and how these relate to the job.

    For example, as an odp you might have to deal with people who are scared. So if say you had been in a youth group and had helped deal with someone who was scared about something you could use that as an example with a brief explanation of how you helped them over come that.


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    Not sure of trolling or not, so I'll give OP the benefit of the doubt.

    First of all, OP you say you love theatre work, but have no idea about the role of ODP or theatre nurse. How can you love something you know very little about?

    (Original post by sully50sully)
    from what I have understood from the NHS website is that it's not actually a nurse, a nurse/theatre nurse is VERY different from an ODP.
    Wrong. ODP's and nurses these days do the same jobs in theatre. Nurses have to have done a postreg course in anaesthetics if they want to be an anaesthetic assistant whereas ODP's cover this in their pre reg training. Both ODP's and nurses work in scrub and recovery, the roles are exactly the same and a lot of hospitals employ both under the job title "theatre practitioner".

    Sometimes some hospitals allow people to visit theatres if they get in touch with them and have an interest working in the perioperative environment. As others have said you will also probably need volunteering or other work experience as it's quite competitive to get onto the course.

    I went straight into working in theatres as a nurse on qualification. It's enjoyable and interesting and I've never had a problem with being a nurse. Perhaps that's because I have an adult attitude towards my job, it's something you'll need to get if you want to work in that sort of environment OP.
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    (Original post by thatonethere)
    Doesn't matter about "female based" - I know plenty of male nurses who are very successful
    Some of us are even heterosexual too :shock:


    Not that it matters either way.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Not sure of trolling or not, so I'll give OP the benefit of the doubt.

    First of all, OP you say you love theatre work, but have no idea about the role of ODP or theatre nurse. How can you love something you know very little about?



    Wrong. ODP's and nurses these days do the same jobs in theatre. Nurses have to have done a postreg course in anaesthetics if they want to be an anaesthetic assistant whereas ODP's cover this in their pre reg training. Both ODP's and nurses work in scrub and recovery, the roles are exactly the same and a lot of hospitals employ both under the job title "theatre practitioner".

    Sometimes some hospitals allow people to visit theatres if they get in touch with them and have an interest working in the perioperative environment. As others have said you will also probably need volunteering or other work experience as it's quite competitive to get onto the course.

    I went straight into working in theatres as a nurse on qualification. It's enjoyable and interesting and I've never had a problem with being a nurse. Perhaps that's because I have an adult attitude towards my job, it's something you'll need to get if you want to work in that sort of environment OP.
    I know quite a lot but odps help surgeons most of the time while as nurses take care of the patient and also I have done work experience in a care home with people who have dementia. Theatre nurses are different to odps it even states it on nhs website, a odp and a theatre nurse are very different check it out if you don't believe me.
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    [QUOTE=Happy_Holidays;42158738]You may be able to get general work experience but you would be very unlikely to get any in theatres. Your best bet is to get experience of working with people. That can be from anything such as working in a shop, being part of a youth group. Basically any area you can show your working it others. When they look at your application they will want to see that you understand the job and you can show how your experiences have shown of different skills and how these relate to the job.

    For example, as an odp you might have to deal with people who are scared. So if say you had been in a youth group and had helped deal with someone who was scared about something you could use that as an example with a brief explanation of how you helped them over come that.

    I have done work experience in a care home with people who have dementia, would that benefit me?
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    (Original post by sully50sully)
    I know quite a lot but odps help surgeons most of the time while as nurses take care of the patient and also I have done work experience in a care home with people who have dementia. Theatre nurses are different to odps it even states it on nhs website, a odp and a theatre nurse are very different check it out if you don't believe me.
    I am a qualified nurse and have worked in operating theatres as a nurse and as a support worker before that for five years now. I know what is involved in the jobs, I have done them. When scrubbed an ODP will prepare the trays of instruments and pass them to the surgeon and account for all the items there. A scrub nurse does exactly the same. In recovery an ODP will look after a patient, give appropriate analgesia, keep the patient safe and inform anaesthetic or surgical staff of any problems, exactly the same as a recovery nurse would. In the anaesthetic assistants role an ODP will prepare drugs, airway equipment and support the anaesthetist in their role, in exactly the same manner as an anaesthetic nurse would. There is no difference between the role of a nurse in theatres and an ODP. You're getting confused with what nurses do on wards and other environments.
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    I am a qualified nurse and have worked in operating theatres as a nurse and as a support worker before that for five years now. I know what is involved in the jobs, I have done them. When scrubbed an ODP will prepare the trays of instruments and pass them to the surgeon and account for all the items there. A scrub nurse does exactly the same. In recovery an ODP will look after a patient, give appropriate analgesia, keep the patient safe and inform anaesthetic or surgical staff of any problems, exactly the same as a recovery nurse would. In the anaesthetic assistants role an ODP will prepare drugs, airway equipment and support the anaesthetist in their role, in exactly the same manner as an anaesthetic nurse would. There is no difference between the role of a nurse in theatres and an ODP. You're getting confused with what nurses do on wards and other environments.
    oh ok
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    I am a qualified nurse and have worked in operating theatres as a nurse and as a support worker before that for five years now. I know what is involved in the jobs, I have done them. When scrubbed an ODP will prepare the trays of instruments and pass them to the surgeon and account for all the items there. A scrub nurse does exactly the same. In recovery an ODP will look after a patient, give appropriate analgesia, keep the patient safe and inform anaesthetic or surgical staff of any problems, exactly the same as a recovery nurse would. In the anaesthetic assistants role an ODP will prepare drugs, airway equipment and support the anaesthetist in their role, in exactly the same manner as an anaesthetic nurse would. There is no difference between the role of a nurse in theatres and an ODP. You're getting confused with what nurses do on wards and other environments.
    So do you know where I can do relevant work experience? and also how is the pay is it good, can you live on it comfortably?
 
 
 
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