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Is it ALWAYS wrong to celebrate at the news of someone's passing? Watch

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    I start this thread in light of the passing of Baroness Thatcher. Posting my respects on Facebook sparked a mini-debate on her legacy, which started off with why I was even paying my respects in the first place. Someone even likened her to Hitler, and asked whether I would think an R.I.P is in order with him. I shrugged it off by asking how one could even compare the two, however it did get me thinking. Is it always wrong to celebrate at someone's death? I stand by my view that, while I didn't agree with her policies and views, it is utterly childish to cheer at her death. She's still someone's mother, aunt, friend etc. She is still a human being no matter what she has done. If any rejoicing should have been done, the better time was over 20 years ago at her resignation.

    Does this mean we should accord the same moral reasoning to every human being? Would it be wrong to celebrate Hitler's death for example, because he is still human? Should we be happy at the demise of Kim Jong Un, and gleeful at the news of his puppeteers (if he isn't doing the real leading) being struck down by illness? If there are exceptions, where do we draw the line at the acceptability of celebration, or is such a thing too arbitrary? Perhaps it does depend on the circumstances, those who have lived through the hardship of a dictator will probably rejoice. However, some of you may think that it is never right to celebrate at someone's death, regardless of subjectivity.

    Discuss.
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    Nothing to do with right or wrong; just do as you please. What is annoying is when people start arguing over what is the appropriate way to react to someones death -who cares either way.
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    Sometimes it is perfectly acceptable to rejoice at a death. To use a well-worn example; can you really say you would not have rejoiced at Hitler's death, had you been alive? I would have been cheering.

    Besides, people are entitled to hate others. If they want to celebrate a death, that's fine by me. I can't tell them who to respect.
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    Dude, she's someone's mum. She wasn't nearly as bad as people make out, and most people our age have no right to celebrate as we didn't live through it all. Half of our generation don't even understand what she did for the country, or how she pulled it out of economic ruin. It's just the wannabe 'lefties' of the NUS celebrating the death of a woman who actually did them more good than they are willing to admit. At the end of the day, the general shift to the right of English politics suggests that as a nation, we accept that the hideously left wing behaviour of the unions was out of order, and that we were not willing to condone that.
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    (Original post by bunnyonthehill)
    Dude, she's someone's mum. She wasn't nearly as bad as people make out, and most people our age have no right to celebrate as we didn't live through it all. Half of our generation don't even understand what she did for the country, or how she pulled it out of economic ruin. It's just the wannabe 'lefties' of the NUS celebrating the death of a woman who actually did them more good than they are willing to admit. At the end of the day, the general shift to the right of English politics suggests that as a nation, we accept that the hideously left wing behaviour of the unions was out of order, and that we were not willing to condone that.
    You haven't answered the question "Is it ALWAYS wrong to celebrate at the news of someone's passing?" just for Thatcher....

    As someone above has said, if I had been alive when Hitler died. I probably would have been cheering. So, no, it is not always wrong.
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    one post in and godwins law has alraeady been evoked :P as others have pointed out theres no real right or wrong way to celebrate; it's either a case of ding dong merrily on high the witch is dead or tributes to gandhi. I suppose being such a controverstial figure theres boundto be a few tussels over how Thatcher should be mourned , but so long as you remember the dead I suppose that's the main thing
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    (Original post by TheGuy117)
    You haven't answered the question "Is it ALWAYS wrong to celebrate at the news of someone's passing?" just for Thatcher....

    As someone above has said, if I had been alive when Hitler died. I probably would have been cheering. So, no, it is not always wrong.
    Well no, it isn't ALWAYS wrong, I agree. But the thread was evidently created with the recent 'Thatcher is dead' parties, which is why that constituted the focus of my remark. Sorry, just sick of people partying- it's sick and twisted.
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    (Original post by Danz123)
    I start this thread in light of the passing of Baroness Thatcher. Posting my respects on Facebook sparked a mini-debate on her legacy, which started off with why I was even paying my respects in the first place. Someone even likened her to Hitler, and asked whether I would think an R.I.P is in order with him. I shrugged it off by asking how one could even compare the two, however it did get me thinking. Is it always wrong to celebrate at someone's death? I stand by my view that, while I didn't agree with her policies and views, it is utterly childish to cheer at her death. She's still someone's mother, aunt, friend etc. She is still a human being no matter what she has done. If any rejoicing should have been done, the better time was over 20 years ago at her resignation.

    Does this mean we should accord the same moral reasoning to every human being? Would it be wrong to celebrate Hitler's death for example, because he is still human? Should we be happy at the demise of Kim Jong Un, and gleeful at the news of his puppeteers (if he isn't doing the real leading) being struck down by illness? If there are exceptions, where do we draw the line at the acceptability of celebration, or is such a thing too arbitrary? Perhaps it does depend on the circumstances, those who have lived through the hardship of a dictator will probably rejoice. However, some of you may think that it is never right to celebrate at someone's death, regardless of subjectivity.

    Discuss.
    If there is reason to, no. But to compare Thatcher to the likes of Hitler or Stalin etc is just plain ignorance. Not saying you are ofc, but those who celebrate her death are probably.
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    Of course it is completely different to celebrating the death of your enemies in legitimate warfare, this can hardly be compared to that.

    Really doesn't surprise me though to see how so many of the infantile ones around here cannot contain their venom - its pathetic celebrating someone's death in such a manner.

    They just don't have any dignity or style whatsoever.
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    Hitler
    /thread.
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    It's one thing to rejoice at the death of someone who, as an individual, caused you immense suffering (for example, if someone murdered a close family member). However Thatcher's ever so unpopular policies could only be executed after a vote in parliament. A vote which is undertaken by officials elected by the general public. So I don't think she can be squarely blamed for everything as she couldn't have done it alone.

    Personally I take the view that she hasn't been in politics for a very long time so to celebrate that she's gone seems wrong. If there was a time to celebrate the end of her reign of terror, it would have been when she was forced out of office in 199*grumble mumble something*.
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    (Original post by Danz123)
    I start this thread in light of the passing of Baroness Thatcher. Posting my respects on Facebook sparked a mini-debate on her legacy, which started off with why I was even paying my respects in the first place. Someone even likened her to Hitler, and asked whether I would think an R.I.P is in order with him. I shrugged it off by asking how one could even compare the two, however it did get me thinking. Is it always wrong to celebrate at someone's death? I stand by my view that, while I didn't agree with her policies and views, it is utterly childish to cheer at her death. She's still someone's mother, aunt, friend etc. She is still a human being no matter what she has done. If any rejoicing should have been done, the better time was over 20 years ago at her resignation.

    Does this mean we should accord the same moral reasoning to every human being? Would it be wrong to celebrate Hitler's death for example, because he is still human? Should we be happy at the demise of Kim Jong Un, and gleeful at the news of his puppeteers (if he isn't doing the real leading) being struck down by illness? If there are exceptions, where do we draw the line at the acceptability of celebration, or is such a thing too arbitrary? Perhaps it does depend on the circumstances, those who have lived through the hardship of a dictator will probably rejoice. However, some of you may think that it is never right to celebrate at someone's death, regardless of subjectivity.

    Discuss.
    THANK YOU. I am most definitely a lefty, but I had exactly the same scenario. I've grown up in an area built up on industry and even now we still see some of the effects of her regime, which is quite frankly terrible. Someone told me to "do my research." I've done plenty of research, and all I need to do is take a walk down my own street and look at the vivid contrast in housing, go to school in classes with the kids that have cars before they can drive and kids that west a hand-me-down uniform, and recall my own experiences. I cared and watched my own boyfriend die at 17, and that's all I need to compile my "research." Research my backside, life, compassion and real people are what count.

    What happened under her rule was terrible. I'm from a Scottish industrial village. Both my parents grew up in council houses, and had to fight and give up their own dreams to get "good jobs" to escape the poverty cycle caused by privatisation. So no-one will dare tell me I don't understand, I should understand more than most considering my background, even if I am a 3rd generation.

    However, the problem with the world is that there is a lack of compassion. I saw someone on facebook write "aye, good riddance ya c**t." :O that language is uncalled for. Yes she hurt a lot of people but death is nothing to be rude or joke about, and I know more than a lot of others that sometimes a hurtful comment at the wrong moment can seriously affect the grieving process. And she was their family. I know personally that no-one's death is a laughing matter.

    I don't for one minute condone what she did for industrial workers and their families, far from it, especially not something that's so deeply rooted in my own personal family history. But I refuse to lower my standards as a human being by referring to an old lady, or anyone for that matter, as a "c**t." She showed no compassion for those industry workers, not one bit. But does this make it okay to stoop to that level and show no compassion for her family? Her family didn't rule this country - she did. Any human being that is that rude in general needs to rethink their use of vocabulary. Calling her an old witch may be true, but it won't solve any problems. If it was going to solve anything then that would've manifested itself while she was I'm office, not 20 years after she had no influence in parliament (excluding her ripple effects). Some compassion in society would surely get us a lot further and solve many more problems. How can we be expected to care for our country when we can't respect each other? That goes for those criticising her and for our dear Maggie when she was gaily ruining people's lives. What about when David Cameron's kid died? I don't like him either but I certainly didn't go "wahey! Let's have a party cos the son of a Tory died!" That's horrible. Don't change Yuri opinion of someone because they're dead, but equally there's never any excuse to be rude.

    The way I see it, if you believe in a God, then he will be her judge, and we don't have to. And if you don't then she's in a hole in the ground or in a vase on someone's mantlepiece, so it's cool she won't hear your comments - only her family can, the one's that probably don't deserve to having done nothing really wrong themselves.

    To play devil's advocate against anyone here, in a roundabout way you could argue that I'm posting this from my nice 3 bedroom detached house because of her, and her privatisation. But why did it have to and that way through the suffering of others? She had some will I'll give her that, and she fought for what she felt was right. Shame for her that a lot of what she felt was right a significant proportion of the country didn't. But manners cost nothing, and calling her names does not make you a Tory or team Thatcher, it just means you're being mature about it and can express an opinion without using language or being offensive, which apparently isn't easy to do nowadays from the looks of my newsfeed...

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    (Original post by Danz123)
    However, some of you may think that it is never right to celebrate at someone's death, regardless of subjectivity.

    Discuss.
    Death can be good or bad, for equal reasons. Bad In that a loved one of someone dies, depending on what you believe they're going nowhere, and the idea of futility.

    But it can be good in that something good can come from it, be it release, someone no longer suffering or in pain, no longer under a strict regime, depending on your religious views they're going somewhere better...list goes on for both pros and cons, depends on the situation really and your personal opinions.

    One thing though is that death is extremely powerful, and human beings can't control it completely.

    I wouldn't make a mockery of the fate of another human as I just don't feel it's very nice, but also because sooner or later, death is gonna come back and bite you on the ass, and you might not be laughing then!


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    Way I see it, if she was insulted when alive, what's the point in suddenly having reverence for her when she's dead? Don't like it when people say we shouldn't celebrate someone's death because they were a "human being" at the end of the day... Yes they're a human being, that's why they're dead and why they were ALWAYS going to die - its predestined from birth. She was always a human being, even when alive and you had no problem with the insults. Why be peachy disrespecting them when alive, but soon as they die they are sacred and worth respect, "she was a mother" etc. Well she was a mother when she was alive, but you had no problem cursing her down. If you're going to hate someone alive, hate them when they're dead too, there is no point suddenly changing your tune. Don't respect them the moment they can't appreciate it. Don't recognise them as a "person" the moment they stop being one. Respect them alive or don't at all. I personally think it's mildly tasteless to celebrate someone's death but it's no different from publicly despising someone alive. Death isn't an extraordinary event, happens all the time and will to everyone, why all the special treatment once it does? No point getting all high and mighty over a person once they pass. If you hated them alive, don't see why you wouldn't keep doing so once they are dead.
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    I think it's distasteful and inappropriate, but is it really 'wrong' in some kind of an objective way? I doubt it.
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    Thatcher when she was in power had 10 guys licking and sucking each and every of her ten individual toes... she had a good life and had her fun , why should we feel sorry for her this week??
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    Let's not forget that as a nation we celebrate the death of a controversial figure every year on 5th November - so why are people so bothered about some people celebrating the death of a different one?
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    (Original post by g_star_raw_1989)
    Nothing to do with right or wrong; just do as you please. What is annoying is when people start arguing over what is the appropriate way to react to someones death -who cares either way.
    Precisely. The dead don't care; the only people who will be offended by the celebrations of a death are those who feel it's inappropriate to do so, because... life is sacred or something.

    But if you don't feel that way, if you're happy someone's gone... why do you care about someone else's take on what's 'appropriate'?
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    People still awake or just woken up?
    Anyway, i don't think there's really a wrong or right answer. It's death. We'll all face it, none can escape, and I'm sure how people react won't change our lives, people's views on us, or the fact we're dead. I don't know, however I can see how relatives wouldn't want to celebrate someone's death. However, if the persons no longer suffering, then sometimes wouldn't they want to celebrate./celebrate their lives etc.
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    well, it's not up to me to decide what's right or wrong, or how a person should feel toward someone's death. But to me, even if i might like the outcome of someone's passing, I'd never celebrate it, not secretly, and not openly.
 
 
 
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