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    Hey all,

    Just wondering if anyone is going to the applicant visit day in biosciences tomorrow?

    I'll be working the day as a current student but if you've got any questions or worries before hand feel free to ask
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    (Original post by nicatre)
    Hey all,

    Just wondering if anyone is going to the applicant visit day in biosciences tomorrow?

    I'll be working the day as a current student but if you've got any questions or worries before hand feel free to ask
    Hi, I'm not going to the AVD tomorrow (I've already been) but I have a few questions: What is the workload like & how much independent studying are you expected to do? Are there a lot of lab reports/essays you have to write? It's just that I'm slightly anxious about the jump from A-level Biology to a degree in it & I just hope I'll be able to cope. Thanks (oh, btw i've applied for Biological Sciences)
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    (Original post by Fortitude)
    Hi, I'm not going to the AVD tomorrow (I've already been) but I have a few questions: What is the workload like & how much independent studying are you expected to do? Are there a lot of lab reports/essays you have to write? It's just that I'm slightly anxious about the jump from A-level Biology to a degree in it & I just hope I'll be able to cope. Thanks (oh, btw i've applied for Biological Sciences)
    Ah you've been to an AVD. In which case, I may have already met you XD

    Complicated question and there's no straight forward answer but don't worry.

    There is no jump from A Level to degree. As no one comes in with the same background in theory nor practice, the first year really is a leveling ground. Obviously you will learn a lot more material than at A Level but you re-cap it all and then the extras are, for the most part, at no higher level. Obviously learning a lot of material is difficult but don't worry about the academic level of the work.

    There is no set formula for modules regarding assessments etc but a typical 20 credit (out of 120 credits for the year) module would consist of 20-25h of lectures, 1-3 practicals, maybe a workshop or an in-course test. Your coursework (or 'in-course assessment') would usually be 30-40% of the module and could consist of writing up from a practical, and MCQ test, workshop material (on stats for example), an essay, a presentation etc.

    There is a huge range of diversity in module structure though. For example there are a couple of available field modules with no exam, just a small 'test' but mostly the write up of the field work. There ais also a discussion/problem solving/independent learning based module which is 100% coursework.

    Regarding independent learning. 1 credit is meant to equate to roughly 10hs of work. This includes ALL mandatory time-tabled work (lectures, workshops, tests, exams) AND independent learning (reading ahead, going over lecture material, revision). But this is obviously a guide. If you were managing to do an hour of reading/note-writing for every hour of lectures you'd be doing well


    A final thing. 1st year isn't difficult. It matters of course but you're expected to have a lot of fun (like in other years) and just get used to the university format. So when you get here don't worry about being too rigorous with studying. Meet people and chill out as well

    I hope you get your first choice, be it Birmingham or not.
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    (Original post by nicatre)
    Ah you've been to an AVD. In which case, I may have already met you XD

    Complicated question and there's no straight forward answer but don't worry.

    There is no jump from A Level to degree. As no one comes in with the same background in theory nor practice, the first year really is a leveling ground. Obviously you will learn a lot more material than at A Level but you re-cap it all and then the extras are, for the most part, at no higher level. Obviously learning a lot of material is difficult but don't worry about the academic level of the work.

    There is no set formula for modules regarding assessments etc but a typical 20 credit (out of 120 credits for the year) module would consist of 20-25h of lectures, 1-3 practicals, maybe a workshop or an in-course test. Your coursework (or 'in-course assessment') would usually be 30-40% of the module and could consist of writing up from a practical, and MCQ test, workshop material (on stats for example), an essay, a presentation etc.

    There is a huge range of diversity in module structure though. For example there are a couple of available field modules with no exam, just a small 'test' but mostly the write up of the field work. There ais also a discussion/problem solving/independent learning based module which is 100% coursework.

    Regarding independent learning. 1 credit is meant to equate to roughly 10hs of work. This includes ALL mandatory time-tabled work (lectures, workshops, tests, exams) AND independent learning (reading ahead, going over lecture material, revision). But this is obviously a guide. If you were managing to do an hour of reading/note-writing for every hour of lectures you'd be doing well


    A final thing. 1st year isn't difficult. It matters of course but you're expected to have a lot of fun (like in other years) and just get used to the university format. So when you get here don't worry about being too rigorous with studying. Meet people and chill out as well

    I hope you get your first choice, be it Birmingham or not.
    Thank you so much! That's really reassuring & Birmingham is my first choice, thanks once again. Also I wish you good luck with whatever you want to go on to pursue
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    (Original post by Fortitude)
    Thank you so much! That's really reassuring & Birmingham is my first choice, thanks once again. Also I wish you good luck with whatever you want to go on to pursue
    No problem you're going to be fine. Feel free to message me again if you have any worries. If you're really concerned about what you'll learn go pick up Campbell & Reese 'Biology'. It covers pretty much every topic at an introductory level for degree and is one of the recommended texts in first year.

    Cheers I'm heading to St Andrews to start a (most likely Part-Time) PhD in Animal Behaviour
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    (Original post by nicatre)
    No problem you're going to be fine. Feel free to message me again if you have any worries. If you're really concerned about what you'll learn go pick up Campbell & Reese 'Biology'. It covers pretty much every topic at an introductory level for degree and is one of the recommended texts in first year.

    Cheers I'm heading to St Andrews to start a (most likely Part-Time) PhD in Animal Behaviour
    Thanks & congrats on getting onto a PhD, sounds very interesting ( & fun)
 
 
 
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