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    Hi, I'm currently studying for my A2s and I've got 7 exams in May/June aiming for ABB overall. I'm studying Economics, Business and Media

    I'm interested in knowing any revision techniques you use as every time I start revising within 15-20 minutes I feel very tired and start drifting off (all I do is read out of revision textbooks)

    Any help would be appreciated
    Thanks, Jordan


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    (Original post by Jordan_Howell1)
    Hi, I'm currently studying for my A2s and I've got 7 exams in May/June aiming for ABB overall. I'm studying Economics, Business and Media

    I'm interested in knowing any revision techniques you use as every time I start revising within 15-20 minutes I feel very tired and start drifting off (all I do is read out of revision textbooks)

    Any help would be appreciated
    Thanks, Jordan


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    I usually tend to use past papers to help me revise. I do a past paper and mark it (if I have the answers) and work on the areas I didn't do well, then I do another past paper and repeat the process. Past papers probably take awhile (try to do it in timed conditions) so if you are getting tired in 15-20 mins try finding a way to get through it (coffee or a refreshing shower?).

    Another thing I do is make flash cards of some areas of the course to make sure I know the basics so I find it helps flash cards are a good thing to do in 15-20 mins once you have made them.

    Good luck with your exams and revision :P


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    Don't listen to the immature comments on media everyone has their own strengths and things they did fun try doing mind maps / spider diagrams for different topics, although it can take time you learn a lot of it when writing it down, i use loadsa colours in my so i don't get bored when reading it again, reading notes outload also helps me concentrate more. then try past papers so you know where to improve good luck :-)

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    (Original post by zbaxter1)
    I usually tend to use past papers to help me revise. I do a past paper and mark it (if I have the answers) and work on the areas I didn't do well, then I do another past paper and repeat the process. Past papers probably take awhile (try to do it in timed conditions) so if you are getting tired in 15-20 mins try finding a way to get through it (coffee or a refreshing shower?).

    Another thing I do is make flash cards of some areas of the course to make sure I know the basics so I find it helps flash cards are a good thing to do in 15-20 mins once you have made them.

    Good luck with your exams and revision :P


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    Thanks for your reply! I hadn't thought about using flash cards before but I'll definitely try it!


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    (Original post by kathrync)
    Don't listen to the immature comments on media everyone has their own strengths and things they did fun try doing mind maps / spider diagrams for different topics, although it can take time you learn a lot of it when writing it down, i use loadsa colours in my so i don't get bored when reading it again, reading notes outload also helps me concentrate more. then try past papers so you know where to improve good luck :-)

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    Thanks! Im definitely going to try mind maps and spider diagrams, seems like a good way of remembering certain information. I had heard that using colour can make you remember things quicker and as you say it should make it more interesting when reading it back! Thanks for your reply!


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    We had a massive lecture at my school about revision techniques. One teacher said how if you make a mind map and stick it at eye level in an area you look at often you should be able to look up in your exam and imagine it in front of you haha.
    Don't know if it actually works but you never know!
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    (Original post by mcdermie)
    We had a massive lecture at my school about revision techniques. One teacher said how if you make a mind map and stick it at eye level in an area you look at often you should be able to look up in your exam and imagine it in front of you haha.
    Don't know if it actually works but you never know!
    Sounds like an interesting technique, but I'll give anything ago. Thanks!


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    (Original post by Jordan_Howell1)
    Hi, I'm currently studying for my A2s and I've got 7 exams in May/June aiming for ABB overall. I'm studying Economics, Business and Media

    I'm interested in knowing any revision techniques you use as every time I start revising within 15-20 minutes I feel very tired and start drifting off (all I do is read out of revision textbooks).
    Hello Jordan,

    My advice is given here. If you've got any other questions then just quote me for a response and ask.

    All the best.

    Darren
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    You could try and record yourself saying key points and listen to them throughout the day, I've heard that's meant to really help

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    Study Helper
    (Original post by Jordan_Howell1)
    Hi, I'm currently studying for my A2s and I've got 7 exams in May/June aiming for ABB overall. I'm studying Economics, Business and Media

    I'm interested in knowing any revision techniques you use as every time I start revising within 15-20 minutes I feel very tired and start drifting off (all I do is read out of revision textbooks)

    Any help would be appreciated
    Thanks, Jordan
    Here is your problem.

    'just reading' is, without a doubt, the worst way to revise there is.

    There is a list of study skills here, and successful revision is really simple: you have to engage with the information. When you read over it, you're not really processing it, you're not doing anything active with the information. By active, I mean something that forces the information to run through your mind - thinking about it, summarising it (of which, making mind maps is a technique, but I prefer writing a summary as opposed to a mind map), linking it to other things, ask "why?", don't copy out of the textbook, read it, process it, then write it down in summary without looking at the textbook (it forces you to remember and utilise your memory, whereas copying out gives you the illusion that you know or understand it, when in actuality you don't).

    There's a great video from Samford University here that runs through studying.

    Personally, how I study is

    I'll decide what topic I'm going to run through and learn: I get the lecture slides up on my computer, get the textbook(s) out at my desk, then take out my notebook.
    I'll look at the relevant parts of the textbook and read through them, then I'll look at the lecture slides and compare what it says there - see what matches up, see what's missing, fill in the gaps. I'll then take all that information, put it altogether, and summarise it in my notebook. I'll make sure I understand why and how whatever I'm writing works: if I don't, I'll think about why, look up the answer elsewhere maybe on the internet or in journals if I can't figure it out. Read why and then put it in my notes.
    When I'm writing, I'll be thinking about the information and connecting it to other things I know: for example, I'm doing physiology of obstructive lung disease and was reading about mucus hypersecretion causing a decrease in airway diameter - and thought "oh yeah, that happens in asthma!", and it also made me think a bit about the mucociliary escalator, how that works, and I connected that with how you sometimes cough up mucus, or feel it in your throat and swallow it - that's because of the mucociliary escalator!
    And suddenly, I've just linked what I've read to lots of other stuff I already know, I understand it well, and it's quite 'locked' in my memory and I'm not going to forget about it as soon as I move on! I suppose the analogous process for you would be reading about some principle in Media, and then remember that you had seen that exact thing on adverts or TV, and how well that worked.

    I'll also make flashcards of super condensed information or isolated facts in Anki, and revise the information whenever that tells me to.
    Because of the nature of my subject, lots of stuff is linked together, so I get to revisit the information lots of times as I go through it either when learning other things, or when talking about it with peers or whatever...

    I'll revisit my notes if I've ever forgotten something, which is common with silly facts that I don't flashcard like "the pressure in the right ventricle at the end of diastole is ... "
    I'll also question myself, draw flow charts, things like that to revise information.

    With all of this, I'll use as many mnemonic techniques as I easily can.
 
 
 
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