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    or do they stop at helium core burning and then turn into planetary nebula?
    (Low mass like the sun's mass i mean)
    thanks
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    When the helium is used up, the main sequence star will start fusion of progressively heavier elements which continues until it gets to iron and then stops.

    Fusion of the heavier elements greatly increases the outward thermal pressure which causes it to expand into a red giant before the nuclear reactions finally stop when the fuel runs out and the star collapses to form a white dwarf and nebula.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    When the helium is used up, the main sequence star will start fusion of progressively heavier elements which continues until it gets to iron and then stops.

    Fusion of the heavier elements greatly increases the outward thermal pressure which causes it to expand into a red giant before the nuclear reactions finally stop when the fuel runs out and the star collapses to form a white dwarf and nebula.
    this is for large mass stars i think not low mass
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    (Original post by >>MMM<<)
    this is for large mass stars i think not low mass
    Oooops. Misread the question.

    Then yes, I believe helium is fused to carbon and oxgen which forms a dense ash which collects under gravitational attraction at the core. After shedding the outer layers to form a planetary nebula, the mainly carbon/oxygen core remains to form a white dwarf.

    Shell helium flash occurs in stars between 0.6 to 10 solar masses, in a shell outside the core of the star in it's giant phase. When depleted, it allows hydrogen fusion to start in a layer above the helium layer which produces a pulse.
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Oooops. Misread the question.

    Then yes, I believe helium is fused to carbon and oxgen which forms a dense ash which collects under gravitational attraction at the core. After shedding the outer layers to form a planetary nebula, the mainly carbon/oxygen core remains to form a white dwarf.

    Shell helium flash occurs in stars between 0.6 to 10 solar masses, in a shell outside the core of the star in it's giant phase. When depleted, it allows hydrogen fusion to start in a layer above the helium layer which produces a pulse.
    so can it undergo helium shell burning?! sorry your explanation is above my current level
 
 
 
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