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    I'm thinking of going Thailand this summer with Thaintro, has anyone been with them before who could share reviews!?
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    I don't know the company you are talking about, but I have been to Thailand many times in the past.

    Firstly, you must remember that Thailand isn't a rich country. There is the wealthy parts where there are grand statues and stuff, but there are also the slums and depressingly poor areas. It can be quite distressing if you have never seen poverty like this before. Prepare yourself for this as best as you can, though it is very different in real life to what you see in video's.

    What part of Thailand do you plan on travelling to? I tend to stay away from the touristy parts, but I have relatives over there. Hua Hin is beautiful, much nicer than Pattaya, which are the two touristy places I have been.

    Do go off the beaten track a bit - eat off carts and stands and locally owned cafes rather than restaurants targeting tourists. The food is nicer and fresher. You must try roti. It's not like the Indian roti. It's a sweet dough pancake that is shallow fried practically then topped with condensed milk and sugar - sometimes with egg or banana also, but I like the basic one the best. Heart attack wrapped in tissue. Go to the local shops, better bargains. The markets are amazing. If you have a multi-region DVD player there are some real bargains to be had. The "designer" t-shirts are of really good quality surprisingly, we have some that have lasted 7 years now. Learn a few phrases as well, some parts have very few people who speak English. Rice, water, hello/goodbye, please/thank you. Knowing that little bit will help immensely.

    Thais have some strict social customs. When you say hello/goodbye (approximately sawadee ca if you are a woman or sawadee cup if you are a man) press your hands together and bring your head towards your hands. I would check out a video on it. You must also take your shoes off going into someone's house.

    The currency, baht, is generally about 50 baht to the pound. At the moment I think it is closer to 45 baht to the pound. Some things will be considerably cheaper over there, where as some things are almost as expensive as the UK. It is a crime to deface bank notes or coins, as they have a picture of the king on.

    The royal family is well liked and respected over there. As I said above, never do anything that could be considered disrespectful about the royal family. For example, when it was the jubilee in Britain, the Thais I know considered it shamefully disrespectful that we produced masks of the royal family. The entire royal family are given the Will and Kate treatment, with at least 5 minutes at the start of the news dedicated to what the royals have been up to.

    Thailand is a beautiful country, I love the place. Do go and have fun. It isn't just like what you hear in the news.


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    thanks for the info, big help!
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    (Original post by Cynical_Smile01)
    I don't know the company you are talking about, but I have been to Thailand many times in the past.

    Firstly, you must remember that Thailand isn't a rich country. There is the wealthy parts where there are grand statues and stuff, but there are also the slums and depressingly poor areas. It can be quite distressing if you have never seen poverty like this before. Prepare yourself for this as best as you can, though it is very different in real life to what you see in video's.

    What part of Thailand do you plan on travelling to? I tend to stay away from the touristy parts, but I have relatives over there. Hua Hin is beautiful, much nicer than Pattaya, which are the two touristy places I have been.

    Do go off the beaten track a bit - eat off carts and stands and locally owned cafes rather than restaurants targeting tourists. The food is nicer and fresher. You must try roti. It's not like the Indian roti. It's a sweet dough pancake that is shallow fried practically then topped with condensed milk and sugar - sometimes with egg or banana also, but I like the basic one the best. Heart attack wrapped in tissue. Go to the local shops, better bargains. The markets are amazing. If you have a multi-region DVD player there are some real bargains to be had. The "designer" t-shirts are of really good quality surprisingly, we have some that have lasted 7 years now. Learn a few phrases as well, some parts have very few people who speak English. Rice, water, hello/goodbye, please/thank you. Knowing that little bit will help immensely.

    Thais have some strict social customs. When you say hello/goodbye (approximately sawadee ca if you are a woman or sawadee cup if you are a man) press your hands together and bring your head towards your hands. I would check out a video on it. You must also take your shoes off going into someone's house.

    The currency, baht, is generally about 50 baht to the pound. At the moment I think it is closer to 45 baht to the pound. Some things will be considerably cheaper over there, where as some things are almost as expensive as the UK. It is a crime to deface bank notes or coins, as they have a picture of the king on.

    The royal family is well liked and respected over there. As I said above, never do anything that could be considered disrespectful about the royal family. For example, when it was the jubilee in Britain, the Thais I know considered it shamefully disrespectful that we produced masks of the royal family. The entire royal family are given the Will and Kate treatment, with at least 5 minutes at the start of the news dedicated to what the royals have been up to.

    Thailand is a beautiful country, I love the place. Do go and have fun. It isn't just like what you hear in the news.


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    Very good advice.

    One thing to add to what you said about the greeting : You don't need to wai (clasped hands greeting) every time you greet someone, especially if they're working for you (they could get embarrassed). You should always wai your superiors and monks but other than that, I'd only advise giving a wai if the other person wais you first.

    Thais don't expect foreigners to wai so it's not a big deal if you forget. Just always be polite and smile
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Very good advice.

    One thing to add to what you said about the greeting : You don't need to wai (clasped hands greeting) every time you greet someone, especially if they're working for you (they could get embarrassed). You should always wai your superiors and monks but other than that, I'd only advise giving a wai if the other person wais you first.

    Thais don't expect foreigners to wai so it's not a big deal if you forget. Just always be polite and smile
    My Grandma is Thai, and my visits have been to visit relatives, most of whom are getting quite old, so I wai when I first time I see them that holiday. I don't tend to meet professionals so I don't know about that etiquette.

    Monks are a common feature in Thai life, you see them everywhere. Most boys do a stint as a monk as Buddhism is the major religion.

    All secondary school children have the same haircut, as it is the rules, or at least it was the last time I went. This at least was rigorously enforced.

    Just a few other things I thought of.


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    (Original post by Cynical_Smile01)
    All secondary school children have the same haircut, as it is the rules, or at least it was the last time I went. This at least was rigorously enforced.
    Yes it's still like that in government schools.

    I work in a secondary school and some of the boys had long hair so the director came into class and shaved their heads during my lesson!
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    (Original post by notnek)
    Yes it's still like that in government schools.

    I work in a secondary school and some of the boys had long hair so the director came into class and shaved their heads during my lesson!
    The teacher cut a huge chunk out of my female cousin's hair to force her to get it cut! I was horrified at the time, especially considering that Thailand has a large Sikh population from what I understand.


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    Instead of Thaintro check out trutravel on their website www.trutravels.com

    They have a similar itinerary to thaintro but its cheaper and if you book using the code LindaB you get £10 in thai baht when you arrive and a free thai sim card!


    So dont just blindly go with thaintro there are other options out there and you can save money for later on in your trip!!
 
 
 
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