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    I believe these are very simple molar calculations, I'm just a bit confused - no one got a clue?

    Would very much appreciate the help if anyone has the time
    Thanks
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    Very desperate for some help on this, will bump one last time instead of creating a new topic

    If more information about the experiment is needed then I will be more than happy to provide it

    Thanks again to anyone who's had a look
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    (Original post by Kreayshawn)
    I have to calculate the concentration of H+ ions produced in a hydrolysis reaction, I'm having trouble and can't figure out exactly how to do it.

    The reaction is:
    (CH3)3CBr + H2O --> (CH3)3COH + H+ + Br-

    My method is the following:
    - place 100cm of 4:1 water:ethanol mixture into 250cm conical flask
    - place 20cm of 4:1 water:ethanol mixture into six 100cm conical flasks, put in ice bath to cool
    - place indicator in all flasks
    - place 2cm of (CH3)3CBr into 250cm flask, after reacted for specific time intervals place into conical flasks, reaction stops and is quenched as the flasks are cooled
    - titrate solution against NaOH

    I believe the reaction for the titration is:
    H+ + OH- --> H2O

    Can anyone explain to me how to calculate the concentration of H+ ions produced in the reaction? I don't quite understand everything that's going on, or how the titration even helps to calculate the H+ value - I'm very confused. My first titre recording is 1.80cm3 - can someone run me through the calculation using this value?

    Concentration of NaOH is 0.5moldm-3.

    Also - can someone explain why the conical flasks which are cooled contain the water:ethanol mixture? I have carried out the experiment but don't know why this is necessary for quenching.
    in order to find out concentration of H+, you need to titrate it with NaOH. i think you knew that already. so if your result is 1.8cm3, and because the reaction is 1:1 ratio, you simply just calculate how much mole of NaOH you used, then that is the H+ concentration.
    in your case, mole=concentration x volume (dm3),
    so you do 0.5 x 1.8/1000 , which is 0.0009 mol. therefore you hav 0.0009 mole of H+ as well. so you just rearrange the equation to get the concentration of H+. hope this helps. btw im doing the exact same thing as u for my chemistry coursework. i also have some questions that i want to ask you. i sent you a message already. thank you
 
 
 
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