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    (Original post by Jandarini)
    What do girls wear to Freshers' Ball, and other such events? I've ordered a cute little black dress already, but now I'm starting to wonder if it was really worth it.
    I'd quite like to know about this too. I have a proper ball dress from my sixth form leavers' ball, but I'm worried that I would look slightly overdressed at a university freshers or Christmas ball.
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    Some girls do wear ball dresses. Some just wear less posh evening dress type things, or like a skirt and pretty top. It's whatever you feel confortable buying and wearing really!
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    (Original post by Danithestudent)
    If in London there are these cheeky things you can pick up that are leaflets that are 2 for 1. Pick up one of those and it has 4 vouchers in the back and what you can do is you and 7 friends can go to a Deep Pan Pizza and get an all you can eat buffet for £3 each. Though drinks aren't included. Also available are napkins and if you buy tupperware (your mother will send you off with a ton of that) you can make one meal last for days!
    thats a good idea

    i know in sheffiled last year my boyfriend had a few weeks worth of subways thanx to collecting loads of those voucher books.
    ot at uni but a tip i was given is if someone tries to give you coupons.money off vouchers, always take them.

    Oh and free internet access cds make very nice mats
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    What is this fresher's ball all about? When is it? Does every Uni have it?

    I don't think I have absolutely anything suitable to wear right noe, if it is dress-up
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    Okay, here are the fruits of my experience after my first succesful year at uni (and my rather less succesful year before that).

    Tips for commuting students
    You're going to need more books than on-site students. Buy your books cheap. Try to slowly build up a library of books at home. You need to make your home a useful place to study in. Don't think that because you've done A-levels, you'll be ready to study at home. It's a pain in the ass sometimes.

    Get a railcard or any discount card you are eligible for. If you are married to a commuter, you might be able to get a Network Partner Card. These are useful.

    Use your journey to read, think and write. See my advice about earplugs. If you don't want to use earplugs, make sure you don't sit near children or heavy mobile phone users. They're a huge pain in the ear. If you are having difficulty reading, thinking, writing and working on the train/bus/etc., don't. Close the book and put it away. Better to either focus on it properly or get some rest, rather than not understanding it.

    Two words: Thermos flask. Put whatever hot beverage you like inside a big one and enjoy the ride. I'm a hot chocolate man, myself.

    Try and plan your uni social events in advance - it'll make your journeying easier.

    Remember that driving to university can be a serious pain the butt, and that parking fines are expensive.

    Get a big academic diary. Letts do a nice big hardback one with lots of space. Write down as much of the stuff you need to do, because you're bound by your travelling.

    Explore the area around your college/uni. Know where everything is, because that makes life a lot easier.

    Get some form of personal stereo.

    If you're in London, work out the best method of travelling. It may be that the Tube seems convenient, but once you've gone down huge numbers of escalators, it would have been much quicker just to use the bus. Consider getting an Oyster card, since you can use them without having to have cash on you.

    Other crap
    (Original post by Homegrownkitten)
    Programme useful numbers into your mobile, such as your tutors and the library. They will come in handy, and this way saves scrabbling looking for them when you need them.
    If you're a commuting student, put the numbers of all the travel enquiry lines (eg. National Rail, London Transport, bus company etc.), the complaints numbers for the same services, and some taxi numbers in your phone. It's useful.

    Also, having a phone which can do email would be stunningly useful in many instances. (I don't have one, but I wish I did)

    (Original post by jammyd)
    Bookmarks. Lots of them for referencing.
    Yes, you can also get little sticky mini-post-it note things which do the same job. If not, just get a couple of sheets and a pair of scissors and make some for yourself.

    I use old train tickets, since I seem to have an abundance of them.

    Save a copy of your passport photo ON YOUR COMPUTER or on a DISK/MEMORY STICK etc. This can be very useful, since you can print out a whole sheet of passport photos at a copy shop or in your university library (if they've got a colour printer) for much less than it costs to get new passport photos from a booth.

    (Original post by viviki)
    Old cutlery works a treat as a door stop. Also you find that in those unis which have a gideons bible in the rooms that they get used as doorstops on a regular basis.
    If you find a Bible in your room, and you are of the atheist variety of person (such as myself), feel free to leave a 'disclaimer' on a piece of paper tucked in to the cover. It can say something like "This book is a great work of fiction. Any similarity between characters and real human beings or events is not necessarily true. Think for yourself, please."

    If you are evil, you can then superglue it in.

    (Original post by pig)
    Drink Jolt cola. Works a treat on those all nighters, and tastes like those long cola icepops.
    No. Jolt is supposed to be only for computer nerds. You can't advertise it to normal people. We'll have to start importing Bawls instead.

    (Original post by emom100)
    Get a mini fridge... my comunal fridge is disgusting and has traces of bad milk form the last 6 months making a terrible smell. Also people tend to borrow/nick stuff especially things like milk, philidelphia, past sauce and its so annoying to go down to the fridge when your starving and find out that you have nothing left.
    Be careful -- some uni halls don't allow fridges and other big electrical devices in rooms for safety / electricity consumption reasons.

    (Original post by Kalypso)
    If you know that you are going to have an internet connection in your room it is well worth sorting out all the things you will need (an ethernet card if your computer doesn't already have one, and a cable) - my ethernet worked straight away but I didn't have a cable and with hundreds of freshers descending on one town these things sell out quickly and you have to wait aaaages for the shops to get more in!
    Or if you want real nerd points, offer to help people with their computers, bring a big box of Cat-5 cable, cable ends and a crimper and make it yourself!

    (Original post by InterCity125)
    Allways use a railcard and book tickets well in advance. This means that even long distance fares are next to nothing. Good deals are also to be had for first class - if you're interested in the superior comfort afforded by it. 10 days before travel is normally enough. If you want to go first without paying for a first class ticket you can have a meal in the dining car and take most of the trip to eat it!
    Young Person's Railcards don't work on first class journeys.

    But booking ahead is a great thing. I used to pay £35 return for Leicester to my home in Sussex. It's wonderful when you get on at Leicester, sit down next to someone and watch them pay £72 for a return to London.

    (Original post by Sa-ra-ra-ra)
    Divide it up. Open up a high interest savings account (an instant access ISA is ideal) and at the beginning of each term, put half of it in there, then halfway through your term, transfer the rest into your current account. That way, you can earn a little interest on it, and you won't reach the last 3 weeks of term having spent it all, maxed out your overdraft and living on super noodles and bread (which is what an ex of mine ended up doing )
    Be careful though. Cash ISA's work on a tax-deposit limit. Basically, you can only deposit about £3000 in to an ISA. If you deposit more than that, there can be all sorts of problems. That's why you should really treat an ISA as a semi-permanent savings account.

    But don't despair. Some banks/building societies/etc. offer high-interest savings accounts linked with ISA's. This is how I've got mine set up: I got £10,000 this year (inheritance). I split that between the ISA and the non-ISA account - put £3,000 in the ISA (using up this years deposit), and put the other £7,000 in the non-ISA. At the beginning of the next tax year, I'm going to move another £3,000 in to the ISA, making it 6/4, then the year after 9/1.

    This way, I'm maximizing the use of the ISA and have still got some ready for emergencies. Since I'm not a taxpayer, the difference is not huge between the two.

    And this advice is not important unless you are going to be banking over £3,000 a year. (I'm using Intelligent Finance, btw - they're pretty good).

    (Original post by fifi53)
    Hall fire alarms... do they do a register? or just assume you are out for the night? cos i sure as hell am not getting out of bed every time someone burns some toast/ sets them off drunk. i'd rather just take my chances and stay under my duvet!!!
    Depends on your hall. Some do, some don't. When in halls, if it was something trivial or just an idiot setting them off by mistake or for a laugh, generally nothing would happen. Once we did have to register everyone, and flatmates had to vouch for people who were out.

    Some halls have a sign in when you get there (and you have to sign your guests in), in which case, the situation is rather different.

    (Original post by randdom)
    How often does the fire alarm go off?
    Too often. That is one of the few universal rules of living in halls.

    Oh, and when you've got something which is about as comfortable, noise-wise, as trying to sleep in the central reservation of the M25 or next to the engine of a Jumbo Jet, you go outside. The alternative is worse.

    (Original post by Expression)
    If its the hygiene factor that worries you; don't have any hesitation of giving someone a nudge if they are being considerate/hygeinic with their food, especially meats.
    That's the most annoying thing - someone who has something you don't like on their knife goes digging through your margarine and leaves smears all across the tub of something quite, quite disgusting.

    Buy little and often - meaning that if someone steals something or does something dirty with it, you haven't lost a big old pot of something, you've just lost a small pot.

    (Original post by btigershark)
    Just put everything on the good old house insurance like me!

    It won't cost more than a few quid and is normaly reliable
    Yes, when I went to live in halls, the only thing I had which was of insurable value was my laptop. Got that put on all risks on my parents insurance. Cost nothing.

    (Original post by Caitak)
    I was just wondering, someone earlier in the thread said bring stationary. What sort of paper/notebooks would you advise? A4 lined? A5? the ones you get in WHSmith and Woolies at absurd prices with cute pictures on the front?
    Unless you're doing some fancy-pants subject like art, nothing really except pens and paper. I don't use anything else - no highlighters, no underlining sentences in books (criminal damage!), no pencils. That and, quite simply, a fat, metal wire-bound notebook (Rymans do some which have about 200 sheets for about £2). Having all your notes in one big notebook is the answer. If you have them on scraps of paper, you WILL lose them, and you WILL run around your room getting pissed off about it.

    (Original post by Cabby)
    Earplugs if you're in halls, but test them before you leave for uni to make sure you don't sleep through your alarm!
    Earplugs are also useful even if you aren't in halls. I travel by train, and I have often lamented my lack of earplugs when someone brings a whole family of crying, urinating, dribbling, snot-covered children on board while you're trying hard to read the notes for the seminar that you forgot to read last night.

    (Original post by PQ)
    If you are a student and are likely to move home during the holidays do NOT pay for your TV licence by DD...reclaiming that £60 after 9 months is an absolute nightmare. Pay for it up front on the 1st of October and you will save yourself not only a lot of money but a heck of a lot of hassle.
    Alternatively, wean yourself off television. Books are cheaper and better for your brain.

    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    I hope everyone took their NRA/ROA
    That's a good idea. But a better one is to be a miserable ******* at school and tell your teachers to stuff it when they are trying to put together your Record of Achievement.

    (Original post by 98newtond)
    I'm looking at going to De Montfort next year, this forum has been really helpful, but what clothes will i need?
    Make sure you're sure. I've been there and done that. It's not fun.

    (Original post by 98newtond)
    How much sports kit?
    Depends on what you're doing.

    (Original post by 98newtond)
    Will i need a suit or anything like that?
    Probably not. For courses like Law, you may need formal clothes for mooting etc.

    (Original post by 98newtond)
    Anything else i should know?

    Thanks!
    Yes, DeMontfort is the only university in Britain which has a degree completion rate of below 50%. Yes, more than 1 in 2 people who start there won't finish.

    (Original post by Marcos!)
    Here's one for you experienced Uni people, what is there to do if you don't drink alcohol and don't go to bars?

    What other spare time activities have you heard of or done that do not involve getting drunk?
    It depends where you go. Some places have depressingly little in the way of societies that don't involve either kicking balls around fields or getting completely wasted. Some places do. Go for the latter.

    If you get somewhere and find there isn't anything at the uni you want to do, you can always find stuff out in the Real World to do. For instance, when I was in Leicester, I went along to meetings of the Secular Society, because we spent lots of time arguing about politics and religion and so on.

    London is good for that!

    (Original post by Beekeeper)
    Would anyone at uni recommend buying a dinner suit before you start, or just hiring one when you need it?... I know that I can grab one from debenhams for about £140, and the folks are giving me about £400 to get everything ready (clothes, stationary etc.) so I could make space for it I think.
    If you're going to wear it more than three times a year, go for it. If you're a student, Moss Bros hire is about £35. If you do buy, get an ex-hire one and make sure it fits. That's important.

    (Original post by Marcos!)
    What is this fresher's ball all about? When is it? Does every Uni have it?
    No, some do, some don't. Some unis have different things for different departments.

    /me remembers back to sitting in that ****** room drinking weak orange squash with my fellow art students

    What a horrible memory.
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    Hi everyone!

    We are all aware that living expense in UK ranges from £6,000 to £10,000 per annum for a uni student (esp. for an overseas student). I'm planning to join either Plymouth uni or Surrey uni for Engineering this September. Plymouth uni's website clearly mentions that students need to pay around £6000 p.a. for living expense. However, I couldn't find out the living expense for Surrey uni. Nevertheless, I assume it to be £6000 p.a. too as it is outside London, though living expense is comparatively higher in South-East England than the South-West region.

    Now I'm just wondering about how much I need to pay for my living expense when I'll be doing my Industrial Placement Year in 2007-2008 (hopefully)!

    During the industrial placement, I would need to pay the uni 50% of the tuition fees.

    Does anyone know the exact cost of living during a year in industry?

    P.S.: I'm interested to work within UK during my Industrial Placement Year.

    Any helpful suggestions will be highly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.
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    I've just got to know from Surrey uni that, for 2005 entry, the cost of living in Surrey would be £600 per month, inclusive of accommodation costs. That means, I would need to pay around £7,200 p.a. :eek:

    Oh no!... why it's too expensive to study in the south-east region??:mad:
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    In case anyone gets worse (or better! :eek: - seriously though, if this happens, you may want to know what other options are open) than they expected, or even if you're just a little unsure about uni, you can call the The Student Essentials helpline on 0808 100 8000. It's funded by the BBC I think. Apparently it's very good, even if it's just for a bit of confidence-boosting.

    Good luck with your results on Thursday, all you A2-level people!
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    (Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
    I've just got to know from Surrey uni that, for 2005 entry, the cost of living in Surrey would be £600 per month, inclusive of accommodation costs. That means, I would need to pay around £7,200 p.a. :eek:

    Oh no!... why it's too expensive to study in the south-east region??:mad:
    i think that might be a slight over estimate. from my experience surrey isnt that expensive really. a bit of budgeting goes a long way.

    aabout freshers ball, i missed mine cause i was ill, but at manchester its not a formal thing, most people go in jeans/shirt/top, casual wear, and its not really a "ball", its more a funfair/disco/drinking pit. you might also get guests like a cool dj or band. or, in the case of manchester 2003, a liberty x tribute band. i think they were called liberty xtra.
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    Yes, Surrey is expensive, especially in the Guildford area (where I have the pleasure of living) around the university. If you avoid the mercedes-4x4-labrador-2-perfect-children-shopping-at-Waitrose kind of areas (ie Godalming, you have been warned!!) then it's not too bad. Remember that although it's quite a wealthy area, there's also quite a lot of poverty. The tescos around the A3 and the hospital is probably one of the cheeper places to shop (it's not really an area known for it's huge expanses of Lidls and the like). If you budget, then it's ok, although comparitively more expensive than other areas. The university probably quotes higher costs to try and avoid students really really pushing it financially;.
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    (Original post by heninacoop)
    Remember that although it's quite a wealthy area, there's also quite a lot of poverty. The tescos around the A3 and the hospital is probably one of the cheeper places to shop (it's not really an area known for it's huge expanses of Lidls and the like). If you budget, then it's ok, although comparitively more expensive than other areas. The university probably quotes higher costs to try and avoid students really really pushing it financially;.
    Yes, I understand your point of view. However, unfortunately, I need to possess sufficient amount of money in my bank account in order get the British visa (since I'm an international student). The British High Commission will check my savings with respect to the uni's requirement (i.e. £10,500 tuition fees + £7,200 living expense p.a.).

    So, now I'm looking forward to apply to University of Plymouth where the tuition fees for Engineering is £7,700 and the living expense is £6,000. Besides that, this uni is also reputed for Civil Engineering although it has been ranked a bit lower than Surrey in the league tables.
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    (Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
    Yes, I understand your point of view. However, unfortunately, I need to possess sufficient amount of money in my bank account in order get the British visa (since I'm an international student). The British High Commission will check my savings with respect to the uni's requirement (i.e. £10,500 tuition fees + £7,200 living expense p.a.).

    So, now I'm looking forward to apply to University of Plymouth where the tuition fees for Engineering is £7,700 and the living expense is £6,000. Besides that, this uni is also reputed for Civil Engineering although it has been ranked a bit lower than Surrey in the league tables.
    if you can manage to get sufficient funds, dont worry about spending it all, you probably wont need to, so it can be carried forward to the next year. but i suppose as an international student you will have extra costs . hm. guilford obviously isnt as cheap as, for example, swansea, but im sure you can get by on less than £7000 :confused:
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    (Original post by princessa)
    if you can manage to get sufficient funds, dont worry about spending it all, you probably wont need to, so it can be carried forward to the next year. but i suppose as an international student you will have extra costs . hm. guilford obviously isnt as cheap as, for example, swansea, but im sure you can get by on less than £7000 :confused:
    Yes, you're right!

    Actually, I cannot afford to pay more than £6000 p.a. for living expense. Moreover, it would also be difficult to pay £10,500 p.a. than paying £7,700 becoz £2800 difference means a lot of money (around 336,000 BDT) in our local currency.

    For international students who are not too rich, it's better to choose unis which are less expensive. On the other hand, UK people have the privilege of paying the same amount of tuition fees to any uni and regardless of undergraduate courses.
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    (Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
    Yes, I understand your point of view. However, unfortunately, I need to possess sufficient amount of money in my bank account in order get the British visa (since I'm an international student). The British High Commission will check my savings with respect to the uni's requirement (i.e. £10,500 tuition fees + £7,200 living expense p.a.).
    Don't you have to put this money in your bamk acount at least 6 months before you apply for Visa?
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    I haven't heard anything like that. As far as I know, one can get the student visa as long as he/she has sufficient amount of funds in the bank account.
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    (Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
    I haven't heard anything like that. As far as I know, one can get the student visa as long as he/she has sufficient amount of funds in the bank account.
    I think it is best that you contact the British High commission in your country and get it cleared. Maybe that rule was only for Sri Lanka and not Bangladesh, but on the other hand Sri Lanka and Bangladesh are both South Asian (SAARC) countries. :confused:
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    (Original post by Goddess)
    I think it is best that you contact the British High commission in your country and get it cleared. Maybe that rule was only for Sri Lanka and not Bangladesh, but on the other hand Sri Lanka and Bangladesh are both South Asian (SAARC) countries. :confused:
    Yeah you're right, i contacted British Council for Professional Advisory Services for Students (PASS) and they said i need to submit sponsor's bank statements (current and savings) with a bank solvency certificate for the last six months.
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    Blackwell's Reading Lists is a website I found yesterday while looking for what books I need to read to prepare for my upcoming course (duh!) :rolleyes:
    So I think a good idea for other students starting sept/oct is to go on this website and look for the modules they're going to be starting.
    Of course your uni might have handed out a reading list already, but if not this is a great site to ensure you're well prepared!!
    Plus it has links for where to buy the books as well


    edit: Mostly a good idea for those who need to read books before they get to uni (i.e. English Literature courses).
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    Yeah... the website seems to be useful, but I couldn't find out the reading list of Engineering courses offered by Plymouth. Not all faculties have updated with this website and not all institutions have provided with their reading lists. Even Imperial has not provided the info yet.

    I hope, in the course of time, this website will get updated with all the institutions and faculties.
 
 
 
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