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Is Willy Loman a tragic hero? watch

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    Hi guys, I would really appreciate it if someone could help me out on this question. So far I've got he is a tragic hero because he does have a fatal flaw <-he had the wrong dreams, his use of poetic/epic language, his death as a sacrifice.

    Could any one expand on any of these points particularly on his flaw, i.e. how Miller shows us this is a fatal flaw + the importance of the poetic language Willy uses ("A man is not a fruit", "The woods are burning").

    Cheers in advance!
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    he is a tragic hero because he has a tragic flaw of believing in false dreams and living in the past. Due to this past, he is unable to accept his present life, or face any of the problems that persist in his life, such as his relationship with Biff, and also he is unable to stand up to Howard. Willy's ability to run away to the past to seek confort and security is his tragic flaw, which leads to his death towards the end of the play. The death is symbolic in showing that he still lives in the past and is unable to face the present. He commits suicide because he believes thats the only way he can support his family and make things right again.
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    we're doing miller alongside oedipus the king, really good contrast of characters - i'm convinced willy is not a tragic hero, especially when you compare him next to oedipus. if you're doing this play as well, you'll know what i mean!!!
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    We've just started Death of a Salesman and read up to the end of Act I.

    By tragic hero, i'm assuming your talking about an archetypal one in which the 'hero' has hamartia (tragic flaw of arrogance) and experiences anagnorisis and peripetia (recognition and reversal respectively).

    Knowing from what i've read so far, Willy certainly possess a tragic flaw. As ppl have said b4, he is too stubborn to let go of his past, and fails to let go of his belief that it is only ppl who possess the quality of 'personal attractiveness' that will succeed in life.

    However, does reversal occur in the play? Although I haven't read Act II I am aware that Willy commits suicide in the end. But is this due to some sort of recognition? Does his luck change from good to bad as in classic greek tragedy? True, he was happy in the past and in a state of depression now, but this change of luck was not due to the fact that Willy recognised his mistakes (or am I wrong? Haven't read Act II so plz correct me! Is it due to the fact that he realizes that he was cheating w/ that woman wrong that his luck changed?). Hence, in this sense, perhaps you can see that Willy does not conform into the archetypal tragic hero.

    I would love to be more elaborate by I have to go now! Hope this was of some help~.
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    find out information about Aristotle's specific characteristics for bein a Tragic Hero - and compare Willy to Tragic Heroes such as Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth etc..
 
 
 
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