need advice Watch

gerrard02
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#1
I'm taking 4 as levels and doing well in 3 of them but completely strugling in 1 of them.
the subjects i'm taking are maths, french, ICT and economics.
I'm 100% sure i'll get A in french, and i think i'll get B's in ICT and maths. I want to do computer science at university. I've already choosen to drop economics next year because i'm finding it difficult and boring. Even if i revise for it i'd probably get a D. So i've been thinking not to revise for it in a bid to get 2 A's in my ICT exams in june.
My question is:
Will i have to write my grade down on my ucas form?
Will it prevent me going to a good university if I got good grades in 3 a levels and a really bad 1 in my 4rth AS subject? As i said i wanna do computer science and it has nothing to do with economics.

thank you
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#2
Report 12 years ago
#2
If you do really badly in economics, you can decline your grade so you don't have to put it on your UCAS form, but then it'll look like you only took 3 ASs and some top unis require 4. Even those that don't require it will probably expect it. If you cash in your grade, it probably won't have that much of an effect because it's unrelated to your chosen subject, but it obviously won't look good and would be a way to choose between you and someone else with good grades in all 4 ASs. I'd revise anyway and try to get a C, which is a much more respectable grade than a D.
0
reply
generalebriety
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 12 years ago
#3
Definitely. Try and get something respectable - certainly make sure you get your As and Bs in other subjects but don't just neglect economics. It is, after all, a fourth AS level. Drop it after AS and take up general studies or something maybe? At least that way you're keeping your mind open and challenging yourself - which is what universities want.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#4
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#4
(Original post by generalebriety)
Definitely. Try and get something respectable - certainly make sure you get your As and Bs in other subjects but don't just neglect economics. It is, after all, a fourth AS level. Drop it after AS and take up general studies or something maybe? At least that way you're keeping your mind open and challenging yourself - which is what universities want.
We have to do critical thinking at my school( which i think is similar to general studies) but universities don't really see it as a proper a level subject I think. i will revise for it a bit, but what if i still get a bad grade do u advice me to put it on my ucas form or just say that i've done 3 as levels and 3 A2 levels?
0
reply
generalebriety
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 12 years ago
#5
If you get a bad grade I would suggest you didn't declare it but pff... don't get a bad grade. Looking as if you just can't be bothered learning economics is only very slightly worse than looking as if you can't be bothered doing more than the minimum number of subjects, especially when your school offers more.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#6
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#6
Ok so i have decided to revise about 15 hours for it.
But say if for example i apply for a top university like UCL for computer science and that I got 2 A's and 1 B at A level ,and that i didn't say anything about economics,shouldn't these grades get me a place at a very good uni?
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#7
Report 12 years ago
#7
(Original post by gerrard02)
Ok so i have decided to revise about 15 hours for it.
But say if for example i apply for a top university like UCL for computer science and that I got 2 A's and 1 B at A level ,and that i didn't say anything about economics,shouldn't these grades get me a place at a very good uni?
Wouldn't you be applying this September though? So you wouldn't have AAB at A-level, just at AS. It should still be enough to get you offers from top unis, but depending on how high the competition was, someone with AABB would probably have an edge. Also, some unis actually require a 4th AS, so you'd have to check that.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#8
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#8
Kellywood, do u know what happens if i get predicted ABB but still manage to get AAB or even AAA at the end of the course? If someone gets predicted say BBC at AS , and then works really hard the following year and manages to get ABB( i know it's rare), does that mean that he can't go to a top uni,just because he only had BBC at AS? Can't he tell the university in august or something that he got what they want?
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#9
Report 12 years ago
#9
(Original post by gerrard02)
Kellywood, do u know what happens if i get predicted ABB but still manage to get AAB or even AAA at the end of the course? If someone gets predicted say BBC at AS , and then works really hard the following year and manages to get ABB( i know it's rare), does that mean that he can't go to a top uni,just because he only had BBC at AS? Can't he tell the university in august or something that he got what they want?
You apply to university at the beginning of Year 13 with your GCSE grades, AS grades if you cash them in (you can also decline them) and your predicted A2 grades. Generally you'll be predicted the same as your AS grade or maybe one higher if you were borderline or just had a bad day. Universities use this information, as well as your personal statement and reference, to decide whether to give you an offer or reject you. If they reject you, even if you go on to get the grades they wanted, there's nothing you can do about it except reapply the following year. If you're made an offer, you're required to get the grades or points they tell you, but if you don't, they might let you in anyway if they have space.
0
reply
Excalibur
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#10
Report 12 years ago
#10
As was the case with my sister: she got CCDD at AS level (History, Maths, Chemistry and Biology respectively), but it was a really unexpected thing and her teachers recognised that she still had some potential - so she was predicted BBB for A levels, which allowed her to apply and get offers from some good unis (like Bristol, Bath, Birmingham). So yes, if you still have potential your teachers can predict you higher than your AS level grades - but it's generally better to do the best you can in them because that's one of things universities will judge you on.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#11
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#11
So basically if some1 gets bad prediction grades but still wants to go to a good uni and then manages to get say 1 A and 2 B's, would he be able to go to a top uni if he takes a year off?
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#12
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#12
Sorry for asking these question that might seem silly because it's my first year in london and i used to live in lebanon so i'm not used to the system here.(i've done something called brevet instead of GCSE's and now i've changed system).Also the school hasn't explained everything clearly. I also heard that i'll need gcse english and math to go to an english uni. I can do the maths gcse easiliy but i'm not sure how hard the english 1 is.
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#13
Report 12 years ago
#13
(Original post by gerrard02)
So basically if some1 gets bad prediction grades but still wants to go to a good uni and then manages to get say 1 A and 2 B's, would he be able to go to a top uni if he takes a year off?
Yep, you can take a gap year after you get your results and reapply if you do really well and weren't happy with the offers you got the first time. Most universities do require Cs in GCSE English and maths, but they also accept equivalent qualifications, so if you've already done something of a similar standard in Lebanon, that might be enough.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#14
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#14
The maths i've done is definately harder,but there is no proof as we don't have any qualifications at year 11 level. That's what i'm worried about. I just don't want them to prefer som1 else over me just because he has GCSE's.
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#15
Report 12 years ago
#15
(Original post by gerrard02)
The maths i've done is definately harder,but there is no proof as we don't have any qualifications at year 11 level. That's what i'm worried about. I just don't want them to prefer som1 else over me just because he has GCSE's.
If the maths you've done is harder, you might as well just take the GCSE because you'll probably find it quite easy to get a good grade. You'll probably have to take English as well. As long as you get those 2 and you get Cs or above, they have no reason to prefer someone else.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#16
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#16
Yeah i'll be taking maths next year. I'm sure i'll easily get a good grade because they made me sit a gcse paper before i was accepted to see if my maths are good enough,and i got 100% on that paper.

But my concern is english. Is it easy to self learn with revision books? Does it take time? Do i have to read a story or something?
Also i think there's coursework. Is the coursework long like the ICT 1 which was like 120 pages. Because if it is i won't have the time to do the english 1 .
0
reply
kellywood_5
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#17
Report 12 years ago
#17
(Original post by gerrard02)
Yeah i'll be taking maths next year. I'm sure i'll easily get a good grade because they made me sit a gcse paper before i was accepted to see if my maths are good enough,and i got 100% on that paper.

But my concern is english. Is it easy to self learn with revision books? Does it take time? Do i have to read a story or something?
Also i think there's coursework. Is the coursework long like the ICT 1 which was like 120 pages. Because if it is i won't have the time to do the english 1 .
It probably depends on the exam board, but I did mine with OCR and there were 2 exams. The first one was on media, so you had to do things like analysing different pieces of writing. The second was on a collection of short stories which you had to answer a couple of essay questions on. The coursework was worth 40%. 20% of it was speaking and listening, which involved giving 3 individual, pair or group presentations on topics of your choice. The other 20% was writing, which involved an essay comparing 2 poems, an essay on a Shakespeare play and a creative writing piece. English would probably be quite a difficult subject to teach yourself because there are no facts to learn, it's more about discussion, skills and exam technique.
0
reply
gerrard02
Badges: 0
#18
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#18
thanks for ur help kellywood 5, most people would have been bored with the amount of questions i've asked.
0
reply
Kolya
Badges: 14
#19
Report 12 years ago
#19
Check the prospectus; you may not need a GCSE in English for CS, only one of those "English as a Foreign Language" qualifications.
reply
dan_b
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 12 years ago
#20
Hey
Just thought id add something to every1 elses comments.
From personal experience i really would encourage you to try your best and get the best grade possible in economics - define terms, give an example is always a good starting point!
but don't worry to much if you end up with a D, i ended up with a D in Chemistry at AS, and put it on my UCAS form and no real effect on uni offers as i got 5 out of 6.

Dan
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Cranfield University
    Cranfield Forensic MSc Programme Open Day Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • University of the Arts London
    Open day: MA Footwear and MA Fashion Artefact Postgraduate
    Thu, 25 Apr '19
  • Cardiff Metropolitan University
    Undergraduate Open Day - Llandaff Campus Undergraduate
    Sat, 27 Apr '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (443)
37.83%
No - but I will (88)
7.51%
No - I don't want to (80)
6.83%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (560)
47.82%

Watched Threads

View All