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Don't think I've been paid enough (new job, wrong tax code?) Watch

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    Hi, I started a new job a couple of weeks ago which is my first job ever. I got paid today but quite a lot less than I was owed and not sure if it's because I'm on an emergency tax code? My friend has said that because I didn't give my employer a P45 when I started (because obviously, this being my first job, I don't have one) this is likely to be the case, so just wondering whether I should contact HMRC directly or ask my employer to change the tax code I'm on or what??
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    (Original post by smutty)
    Hi, I started a new job a couple of weeks ago which is my first job ever. I got paid today but quite a lot less than I was owed and not sure if it's because I'm on an emergency tax code? My friend has said that because I didn't give my employer a P45 when I started (because obviously, this being my first job, I don't have one) this is likely to be the case, so just wondering whether I should contact HMRC directly or ask my employer to change the tax code I'm on or what??
    Ask the employer to give you a P46 to complete. You will then get the correct tax code (what is it now?) shortly after and any supposed overpayments of tax will be corrected automatically in the next pay cycle.

    If you don't have a P45, then the employer will automatically assume you should be taxed at basic rate with no allowances, as these would otherwise be shown on your last P45. The P46 rectifies this.
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    This happened to me on my first job and it took me AGES to get it sorted so just be persistent. If your tax code on your wage slip is OT then you have been emergency taxed.

    Speak to your employer about this. They might offer to contact the tax office for you and get it sorted. If not then yes, contact HMRC. Best time to call them is as early as possible in the morning as they charge you for the phone call and sometimes it can take a ridiculously long time to get through to someone. Just explain the situation to them and they should change your tax code over the phone then send you a letter out of confirmation which you can then give to your employer if needed.


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    This happened to me when I first started my job! Phone HMRC instead of going through your employer as when it happened to me, Head Office at work hadn't processed all my stuff yet so if I'd tried to sort it out via them, it would've taken ages!

    Phone HMRC on 0845 300 0627 with the tax code you're currently on, and they'll sort it out for you, and should sent you a letter confirming this. You'll get a tax refund next payday (or the one after)
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    (Original post by vickiwithanI)
    This happened to me when I first started my job! Phone HMRC instead of going through your employer as when it happened to me, Head Office at work hadn't processed all my stuff yet so if I'd tried to sort it out via them, it would've taken ages!

    Phone HMRC on 0845 300 0627 with the tax code you're currently on, and they'll sort it out for you, and should sent you a letter confirming this. You'll get a tax refund next payday (or the one after)
    Thanks but how do I actually find out what tax code I'm on? Do I need to ask my employer for a P46 before ringing HMRC?
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    (Original post by smutty)
    Thanks but how do I actually find out what tax code I'm on? Do I need to ask my employer for a P46 before ringing HMRC?
    Don't bother ringing HMRC. It really is completely unnecessary. They will keep you on hold for ages and you will pay through the nose for the call, when it could so simply be solved by filling out the necessary paperwork with your employer.

    The only way it is worth calling HMRC is if your employer is dragging their legs with processing the paperwork. Most employers will have it done as quickly as the next pay cycle (paid monthly).

    Don't ring HMRC. Ask for P46. Complete it.
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    (Original post by smutty)
    Thanks but how do I actually find out what tax code I'm on? Do I need to ask my employer for a P46 before ringing HMRC?
    It should say your tax code on your payslip, but if you don't have one yet, HMRC will be able to check for you (give them your NI number) and I didn't have a p46 form so I doubt its necessary to get one

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    If you are on the tax code I suspect, you should be looking for something like BR20

    The correct tax code (depending on job of course) should be something like 944L
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    This happened to me this month and my tax code was OT so I had 20% of my part-time earnings lost. I told Waitrose (my employer) and they showed me to the notice board with the tax office number on, which was just the HMRC helpline. Phone them and they can sort it out, you should bee on 944L or 9somethingL. However if you were paid or your payslip came out before 6 april 2013 then the refund takes a bit longer than if it was in this tax year. HMRC will do it all, I was told tax isnt dealt with in branch.
 
 
 
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