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    So I studies Maths at Swansea University from 09-12 and came out with a 2:2 after getting 50.75% overall.

    I managed to get a place on a PGCE course for Sep 12 but I've recently withdrawn from it as I've realised teaching isn't for me and I've always said if your going to teach you need to have the enthusiasm!

    So I'm looking to find a job now involving my maths and ICT. I studied ICT at GCSE and Computer Science at A-Level so I've got some experience with coding though mostly PASCAL and Visual Basic in Microsoft Office Programs.

    I'm looking for some ideas on any careers or jobs I could go for, or ideas on how I can gain some experience in programming or something along those lines.

    Any ideas would be great. Thanks!
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    Interesting. Have you got decent A-Levels? (280 UCAS points+)

    Actuary and accountancy seem like obvious options.
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    Interesting. Have you got decent A-Levels? (280 UCAS points+)

    Actuary and accountancy seem like obvious options.
    lettuce be realistic, most actuarial firms want oxbridge or russell group graduates, and going to an ex poly will not suffice

    then getting a 2.2 is even worse

    have you looked into trading at betting firms?

    EDIT: Disney Brigade on the NEG train
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    (Original post by Dukeofwembley)
    lettuce be realistic, most actuarial firms want oxbridge or russell group graduates, and going to an ex poly will not suffice

    then getting a 2.2 is even worse

    have you looked into trading at betting firms?
    Wrong. This is a myth, actuarial firms are far, far less selective than Investment Banks or the likes of McKinsey, Bain etc.
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    Wrong. This is a myth, actuarial firms are far, far less selective than Investment Banks or the likes of McKinsey, Bain etc.
    Not an expert but I thought that they generally wanted a 2:1 anyway?
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    (Original post by Rainingshame)
    Not an expert but I thought that they generally wanted a 2:1 anyway?
    Most do but there are some insurers that are more lenient and will take a 2:2 if you have a combination of exam passes and/or exemptions. For accounting, you can definitely find a scheme that accepts 2:2. Degree classification is just one part of the CV though so meeting the requirements does not guarantee anything.
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    Wrong. This is a myth, actuarial firms are far, far less selective than Investment Banks or the likes of McKinsey, Bain etc.
    ok, but i wonder what job requires the most intellectual horsepower

    What do oxbridge/imperial/russell group maths grads do that dont want to spend 100 hours a week at work and also be afraid of getting fired?

    Do you even stop to think that the profession has exams and those exams could easily be correlated with a levels, considering they are maths exams?
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    (Original post by Dukeofwembley)
    ok, but i wonder what job requires the most intellectual horsepower

    What do oxbridge/imperial/russell group maths grads do that dont want to spend 100 hours a week at work and also be afraid of getting fired?

    Do you even stop to think that the profession has exams and those exams could easily be correlated with a levels, considering they are maths exams?
    I don't even understand the point you're trying to make. Could you at least even attempt to make your argument a little clearer?

    From my limited understanding of what you've just said, you're insinuating that actuarial and accountancy exams are based more on A level mathematics than your degree. I can't speak for accountancy exams, but to pass the actuarial ones I'm fairly sure I've seen a few high end stochastic models floating about in some syllabi. Good luck learning those if you haven't done a maths/economics degree or otherwise have a very strong aptitude for learning difficult concepts.

    There's more to being an efficient problem solver than your degree. You need practice, dedication and a good team around you to teach you the ropes. You need to be good with people. You need to be a hard worker, a time manager and suited to the work.

    It's not just about "intellectual horsepower". You can be the least mathematical person in the office and you still be the worker that everyone relies on. It's not as black and white as it is in maths. There's so many different variables to this equation that simply citing one (intelligence) and predicating your argument on that one variable alone will not do much.
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    I don't even understand the point you're trying to make. Could you at least even attempt to make your argument a little clearer?

    From my limited understanding of what you've just said, you're insinuating that actuarial and accountancy exams are based more on A level mathematics than your degree. I can't speak for accountancy exams, but to pass the actuarial ones I'm fairly sure I've seen a few high end stochastic models floating about in some syllabi. Good luck learning those if you haven't done a maths/economics degree or otherwise have a very strong aptitude for learning difficult concepts.

    There's more to being an efficient problem solver than your degree. You need practice, dedication and a good team around you to teach you the ropes. You need to be good with people. You need to be a hard worker, a time manager and suited to the work.

    It's not just about "intellectual horsepower". You can be the least mathematical person in the office and you still be the worker that everyone relies on. It's not as black and white as it is in maths. There's so many different variables to this equation that simply citing one (intelligence) and predicating your argument on that one variable alone will not do much.
    what i am saying is, like the ACA big 4 companies require 300-320 ucas points because the companies see a significant faliure rate for any1 they hire below this threshold

    Now it is my understanding that ACA is much easier than the Actuarial exams
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    (Original post by wanderlust.xx)
    I don't even understand the point you're trying to make. Could you at least even attempt to make your argument a little clearer?

    From my limited understanding of what you've just said, you're insinuating that actuarial and accountancy exams are based more on A level mathematics than your degree. I can't speak for accountancy exams, but to pass the actuarial ones I'm fairly sure I've seen a few high end stochastic models floating about in some syllabi. Good luck learning those if you haven't done a maths/economics degree or otherwise have a very strong aptitude for learning difficult concepts.

    There's more to being an efficient problem solver than your degree. You need practice, dedication and a good team around you to teach you the ropes. You need to be good with people. You need to be a hard worker, a time manager and suited to the work.

    It's not just about "intellectual horsepower". You can be the least mathematical person in the office and you still be the worker that everyone relies on. It's not as black and white as it is in maths. There's so many different variables to this equation that simply citing one (intelligence) and predicating your argument on that one variable alone will not do much.
    Sort of but you don't need to know Real Analysis / Measure Theory to pass the actuarial exams.

    It's watered down so heuristic arguments are enough, unfortunately.

    This is because you don't need a maths degree in order to go down the actuarial route (and even maths grads won't have necessarily have studied RA/ MT).
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    Well, referring back to Tokyoround asking about my A-levels, I've got 2 C's in physics and computer science and a B in maths. PLus an E in chemistry from AS Level, so that's 280 spot on.

    I'm not very interested in actuary work, it looks quite boring to be honest. It's a shame this had to turn into a bit of an argument though, I know most graduate schemes want a 2:1 really, so I'm willing to be flexible. As I said above, I'm interested in ICT and programming, any ideas there?
 
 
 
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