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    Hey people

    This thread is mainly referring to this question: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post42185013


    I want to study Computer Science at university, however what worries me is how much maths will be in the course.

    I know that there is basic maths in programming as I have programming experience, and I have no problem with maths at GCSE level or lower.


    What scares me is that could there be purely maths modules*, a lot of maths taught in the modules, or they could require me to code a program to work out a complicated maths equacion.

    * They might not have made it obvious that the module contains just maths.


    Please reply ASAP as I want to firmly accept Computer Science (G400) at Kingston, however I need to know about any maths if it's in the course.

    EDIT:
    To everyone that has asked here's the course I hope to do: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/
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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    Hey people

    This thread is mainly referring to this question: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post42185013


    I want to study Computer Science at university, however what worries me is how much maths will be in the course.

    I know that there is basic maths in programming as I have programming experience, and I have no problem with maths at GCSE level or lower.


    What scares me is that could there be purely maths modules*, a lot of maths taught in the modules, or they could require me to code a program to work out a complicated maths equacion.

    * They might not have made it obvious that the module contains just maths.


    Please reply ASAP as I want to firmly accept Computer Science (G400) at Kingston, however I need to know about any maths if it's in the course.
    It's definitely going to have quite a lot of high level mathematics. That's why Oxford and cambridge ask for a level maths and physics.

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    Computer Science is as much about computers as astronomy about telescopes. There will be a lot of maths. Computer Science is still considered as a branch of maths.
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    Computer Science can be a very mathematical subject, but different universities treat it differently (often depending on whether the department grew out of the Mathematics or Engineering departments).

    But the Oxbridge courses are about as mathematical as things get, so I wouldn't necessarily base your decision on what they do. Can you provide any syllabi from the Kingston course, details of the course structure or past papers? That would likely help the discussion.

    I wouldn't be surprised if maths is an important part of the course, but as to how much you absolutely have to take (or can instead opt not to take) is best decided by looking at the course structure or talking to a current student there. Also the maths can be of a quite different nature to, say, A-level maths - there isn't as much "continuous" maths so that calculus has less of a role than at A-level.
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    The course structure given at

    http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/

    doesn't look very mathematical to my eyes. Some of the optional modules (e.g. computer vision) could be quite mathematical but most don't, and the degree write-up doesn't make it sound particularly mathematical.
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    Maths is easier than programming.
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    (Original post by RichE)
    The course structure given at

    http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/

    doesn't look very mathematical to my eyes.
    The better the University, the more theoretical/mathematical the course will be as lower ranking universities treat it as a vocational subject.

    As for the original poster, computer science is pretty vast and has lots of sub-areas/topics. You can think of undergraduate level as a taster for these sub-areas. Each topic has it's own requirements in maths e.g information security (number theory), machine learning (statistics) etc etc. but what is common is they all require some maths. So if you want to be become just a programmer(which is not cs) you don't need much maths. If you want to do computer science, then you do require maths. Also in my experience the maths taught at the only maths modules is not enough for the later courses.
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    (Original post by 764dak)
    Maths is easier than programming.
    I have maths dyslexia (discalcula) so for example 12 to me looks like 21. For these reasons I prefer programming as there's less numbers.


    (Original post by dkdeath)
    The better the University, the more theoretical/mathematical the course will be as lower ranking universities treat it as a vocational subject.

    As for the original poster, computer science is pretty vast and has lots of sub-areas/topics. You can think of undergraduate level as a taster for these sub-areas. Each topic has it's own requirements in maths e.g information security (number theory), machine learning (statistics) etc etc. but what is common is they all require some maths. So if you want to be become just a programmer(which is not cs) you don't need much maths. If you want to do computer science, then you do require maths. Also in my experience the maths taught at the only maths modules is not enough for the later courses.
    Off-topic: So what course would you suggest just to learn Java or C?

    This is the course I'm doing: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/


    So everyone in this thread - bassed on this course (http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/) will there be a lot of maths, and to what level?


    (Original post by RichE)
    The course structure given at

    http://www.kingston.ac.uk/undergradu...-science-2013/

    doesn't look very mathematical to my eyes. Some of the optional modules (e.g. computer vision) could be quite mathematical but most don't, and the degree write-up doesn't make it sound particularly mathematical.
    So the core modules don't have anything above GCSE level maths?

    As for the optional modules I'll simply try to avoid anything which requires too much maths.
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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    So the core modules don't have anything above GCSE level maths?

    As for the optional modules I'll simply try to avoid anything which requires too much maths.
    That can probably only be answered by someone at the uni. Is there an enquiry line/admissions person you can write to?

    As you've posted that you're quite taken with Kingston, then you might also consider what your options might be if CS does turn out to be too mathematical once there - is it easy enough to change to an IT or Software Engineering course for example that would be less mathematical?
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    (Original post by 764dak)
    Maths is easier than programming.
    i wouldnt go that far
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    (Original post by 764dak)
    Maths is easier than programming.
    Lol. Mathematicians made computer languages.

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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    I have maths dyslexia (discalcula) so for example 12 to me looks like 21. For these reasons I prefer programming as there's less numbers.
    Okay, that's fair enough.
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    (Original post by Albino)
    i wouldnt go that far
    (Original post by chappers-94)
    Lol. Mathematicians made computer languages.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What do you think of slides 291 to 302?
    https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~dberry/COUR....pdf/myths.pdf

    What do you think of this as well?
    https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~dberry/FTP_...rogramming.pdf
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    (Original post by RichE)
    That can probably only be answered by someone at the uni. Is there an enquiry line/admissions person you can write to?

    As you've posted that you're quite taken with Kingston, then you might also consider what your options might be if CS does turn out to be too mathematical once there - is it easy enough to change to an IT or Software Engineering course for example that would be less mathematical?
    My teacher from college told me that he did a module in Software Engineering and found it extremely hard so I was told to avoid it.

    However if there's less maths and more on programming then it sounds very interesting. My internet is kind of messed at the moment, so even though it's too late (I've already done my UCAS) would you be able to link me on the kingston website if they have it?
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    (Original post by 764dak)
    What do you think of slides 291 to 302?
    https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~dberry/COUR....pdf/myths.pdf

    What do you think of this as well?
    https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~dberry/FTP_...rogramming.pdf
    I was talking about the degree, in CS most mathsy modules are avoidable and the ones you have to do eg; optic computing, game theory and algorithms aren't very taxing. Saying this i also know that CS probably has way more content than mathematics with all the programming languages ect. Overall as a degree maths is harder though. + Couldn't find slide 291-302 amongst the vast sea of slides , but the other one was interesting, programming at high levels definitely isn't easy the application gets complex as **** and checking for errors is probably the most tedious thing ever.
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    (Original post by Albino)
    I was talking about the degree, in CS most mathsy modules are avoidable and the ones you have to do eg; optic computing, game theory and algorithms aren't very taxing. Saying this i also know that CS probably has way more content than mathematics with all the programming languages ect. Overall as a degree maths is harder though. + Couldn't find slide 291-302 amongst the vast sea of slides , but the other one was interesting, programming at high levels definitely isn't easy the application gets complex as **** and checking for errors is probably the most tedious thing ever.
    So is the course I've picked for Kingston won't contain:
    - Pure maths modules.
    - Making programs to calculate difficult math equations.
    - When there is maths in topics like optic computing it will be minimal.


    Try coding in a lower level language like C or ASM, that's when you can complain about things being difficult as you have to write everything yourself (the code is unmanaged), that's when error checking is tedious.
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    Yeah. Once you have to make your own linked lists, hash maps and sometimes your own custom custom data structures then it is getting harder. Try to learn c++ I bet Java guy will find it difficult and annoying since they have never felt a need to create their own sophisticated data structures(ok, you might had to create a lot but try c++ and you'll understand). Yes STL library is forbidden, do everything yourself.
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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    So is the course I've picked for Kingston won't contain:
    - Pure maths modules.
    - Making programs to calculate difficult math equations.
    - When there is maths in topics like optic computing it will be minimal.


    Try coding in a lower level language like C or ASM, that's when you can complain about things being difficult as you have to write everything yourself (the code is unmanaged), that's when error checking is tedious.
    I've never done a programming course at kingston so i wouldn't know you'd have to inquire about it but from what ive heard in general (apart from oxbridge) the maths is minimal but that shouldn't prevent you from reading up on some maths just in case as i imagine **** gets hard as you go on.
    The problem with code is that, basically anyone can pick up a computer and learn to code but as you get to more complex stuff, its all about pretty programming, something you create could work perfectly fine on the surface but when there is an error and the code is just all over the place its so hard to fix.
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    (Original post by chappers-94)
    It's definitely going to have quite a lot of high level mathematics. That's why Oxford and cambridge ask for a level maths and physics.

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    Hi,

    if you study Computer science at Kingston they don't do any maths at all. So, you are in luck. Also, they don't do much in the way of algorithms and data structures either. So, as far as I am concerned it isn't really a Computer Science course.
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    (Original post by tonyhawken)
    Hi,

    if you study Computer science at Kingston they don't do any maths at all. So, you are in luck. Also, they don't do much in the way of algorithms and data structures either. So, as far as I am concerned it isn't really a Computer Science course.
    What sort of things does the course involve then?
    Do you recommend it?
    What do you do now?

    Thanks


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