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Is The Use Of Nootropics ('Smart Drugs') More Prevalent In Society Than We Think? Watch

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    There is tacit talk about that not only do many students in the US and UK (and probably the world) use smart drugs, but that there is actually widespread use amongst lecturers/professors and even more so amongst high-flying members of society (e.g. bankers, managers, lawyers etc).

    I was talking on Skype to a few dudes at MIT and whilst one of them told me that he'd been using smart drugs on and off, another told me that it's really popular there at MIT and other high-flying institutions like Harvard.

    Some of these nootropics can range from "soft" ones like Vitamins or choline which are readily available from Amazon - but the ones that are used by the students in question and professors and high-flyers in society are the "hard" ones - prescription drugs (like those given to ADHD sufferers or so-called "Piracetam" or "Modafinil"). There is even word that soldiers and pilots use modafinil and ADHD drugs if working long hours.

    Use if particularly prevalent amongst busy students and intense high-flyers in society who go out partying hard but then need to be "on the ball" in their employment or study or exams or revision and whatnot.

    Such "hard" nootropics are said to ensure higher, extended and sustained release of important neurotransmitters and whatnot in the brain that are closely related to learning, memory and whatnot.

    Further reading:

    The Guardian - Can a daily pill really boost your brain power?

    The Daily Telegraph - Smart drugs 'should be allowed'

    The jury is out on smart drugs - Should we take memory supplements, like Dame Judi Dench, to help us in our work?

    Students and academics increasingly using 'smart drugs' to boost performance

    TL;DR

    So, is the use of 'smart drugs' more prevalent in all spheres of society than we'd like to admit?

    Are some of our very own colleagues and fellow students trying to get the upper hand whilst some of us are oblivious to this?

    Should the use of such substances (entirely legal but difficult and expensive to obtain) by students be allowed? Is it fair for those of us "non-users"?

    Even more controversially, does anybody here use it? Do you think it unfair?

    Some opinions in the above link say that its use by financially disadvantaged students levels the playing field with those who are privileged. Do you agree with this?

    In short, what do you think about all of this? :curious:
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    I imagine the boost in brain power is not worth the cost - they're probably fairly expensive.
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    I'm aware that there are drugs and things to improve performance that are available and used but I've never felt the need to use them
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    (Original post by PythianLegume)
    I imagine the boost in brain power is not worth the cost - they're probably fairly expensive.
    That's the thing - they're apparently not, hence why their prevalence amongst students is particularly high. According to some of those articles, some apparently go with the "middle" ones like Piracetam and Modafinil which are not only legal but are not very expensive as well.

    The concern here is that such pharmaceuticals as these are not created for cosmetic use but are rather marketed for specific disorders like Alzheimers, narcolepsy and ADHD. To put this into perspective - just recently, a massive US pharmaceutical company (Cephalon) was fined hundreds of millions of dollars for marketing its pharmaceuticals to normal healthy people by claiming they "ward off tiredness" when, in the US, they were only prescribable for specific disorders.
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    I've tried adderall or methylphenidate I believe, and whilst the focus was pretty amazing I doubt it's worth due to the limited availability in the UK and also I wouldn't like to rely on chemical stimulation to study
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    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    That's the thing - they're apparently not, hence why their prevalence amongst students is particularly high. According to some of those articles, some apparently go with the "middle" ones like Piracetam and Modafinil which are not only legal but are not very expensive as well.

    The concern here is that such pharmaceuticals as these are not created for cosmetic use but are rather marketed for specific disorders like Alzheimers, narcolepsy and ADHD. To put this into perspective - just recently, a massive US pharmaceutical company (Cephalon) was fined hundreds of millions of dollars for marketing its pharmaceuticals to normal healthy people by claiming they "ward off tiredness" when, in the US, they were only prescribable for specific disorders.
    Then I imagine they will grow in popularity. The US is experiencing a trend at the moment for treating everything with drugs, and we do love to follow the Americans.
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    Very interested in anything that could potentially improve me. Being a bit of a "fitness fanatic" i already take a great deal of interest in diet and supplementation for physical performance. Why not mental?

    These drugs like any drug known to enhance performance wont work simply by taking them, the studying and mental "training" has to go with it. People will obviously over state there worth but i think academics could certainly benefit from them used smartly and in moderation.

    I haven't run any Nootropics as of yet but i certainly intend to dabble in the near future, heading off to uni as a mature student next year would seem like a good time to see if they have any worth. As with any compound i'll treat them with respect and understand that it's no magic pill but i personally enjoy trying these things out and testing the body.

    Funny that this topic should come up as i was just reading about Noopept a very interesting drug from Russia 1000x more potent than Piracetam.
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    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    There is tacit talk about that not only do many students in the US and UK (and probably the world) use smart drugs, but that there is actually widespread use amongst lecturers/professors and even more so amongst high-flying members of society (e.g. bankers, managers, lawyers etc)
    The use of stimulants is certainly very prevalent, whether caffeine, tobacco or cocaine (in varying quantities).

    Piracetam and Modafinil really shouldn't be mentioned in the same sentence. Modafinil is basically a non-amine stimulant. I remember the drug companies trumpeting it five or six years ago as no-sleep with no come-down.

    Of course, we know now that's not true, and there are some fairly fundamental and common-sense characteristics about the human body. If you boost up your neurotransmitter levels, the body downregulates and you will crash. You use up stores, and so on. There's no free high; you always eventually pay for it.

    Re piracetam... interesting. It's a GABA agonist; I remember being in the gay club Arq in Sydney about 5 years ago (I'm probably a few years older than most of you) and meeting this ridiculously hot pharmacist graduate who'd just started up his own company and was asserting that GHB had neuroprotective qualities (he was on it at the time). Interesting to see that (at least, according to wiki) this has some truth in it.

    In the end, my experience is that you're very much stuck with what you're born with. You can certainly tweak it to some degree, with exercise and a good diet and exercising your mental muscles (neuroplasticity certainly gives hope to all the thickos), but essentially, you will probably remain with a certain band of cognitive performance your entire life.
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    (Original post by HumanSupremacist)
    TL;DR

    We Had A DEAL!


    :huff:


    To be honest, it wouldn't surprise me. The enlightenment was just because of caffeine anyway, it's not a bad thing in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
    We Had A DEAL!


    :huff:


    To be honest, it wouldn't surprise me. The enlightenment was just because of caffeine anyway, it's not a bad thing in my opinion.

    I believe that at the time of writing, I had not yet been made aware of your unofficial and unconfirmed rule.
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    (Original post by PythianLegume)
    I imagine the boost in brain power is not worth the cost - they're probably fairly expensive.
    £9.99 for 1 months supply. not that expensive
 
 
 
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