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Deciding on a career-Money or job satisfaction? watch

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    I have a dilemna, need to decide between chasing money, or having job satisfaction?
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    Are you happy doing any mundane job so you can have money to do as you please outside work, or do you want to enjoy your job and be happy although you may not be able to afford a shiny new car etc.
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    (Original post by glelin96)
    I have a dilemna, need to decide between chasing money, or having job satisfaction?
    can't it be both?
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    Personally as long as it pays enough for a basic roof over our heads and basic food on the table I'd like some job satisfaction, especially considering how old we will have to work to.
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    Are you happy doing any mundane job so you can have money to do as you please outside work, or do you want to enjoy your job and be happy although you may not be able to afford a shiny new car etc.
    (Original post by ce303ce303)
    can't it be both?

    I honestly don't know...At present, I am studying for my AS-levels. I am not predicted the best grades, an A in Economics and Media, and a B in History and Geography.

    I am currently looking at the following options:-

    -Going to university to get a degree in law, following my fathers footsteps to become a barrister, possibly QC. I don't believe this will be possible, as I am predicted such bad grades.

    -Going to university to get a degree in nursing, after a few years practise hopefully get a specialisation into practise nursing, with the possibility of getting onto a medical degree at some point.

    -Leave school and go onto a school leavers program into accountancy, preferably at a big 4 company. I do however have a virtually guaranteed place to work at while I do my ACCA, as a family friend is a partner at the practise. I would possibly look at studying a part time economics degree, to try and get access to work in investment banking, following in my uncles footsteps.

    -Leaving school and entering the police force.

    Basically, when I was younger I always wanted to become a QC like my dad, just to earn good money...Now I'm actually sat here and I'm thinking about whether I actually want to go chasing money, become a lawyer, or entering into the world of finance, or whether I want to spend a lifetime of enjoying my job, but earning the very poor money that I would earn being a nurse or a member of the police force.
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    Job satisfaction a hundred times over. I couldn't bare going to work everyday knowing I'd be spending around 7 hours every week day being bored out of my mind.
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    (Original post by glelin96)
    ...very poor money that I would earn being a nurse or a member of the police force.
    :curious:
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    :curious:
    Well, I really don't want to sound like a snob, so please don't take it that way...My parents are both on very good salaries, with my Father being a QC, and owning businesses, and my Mother being a Judge. I have been brought up in an environment where money has been important. I don't know whether I would be able to live a lifestyle I have become accustomed to if I was to earn around £30000. I have however been brought up to be very independent, and today I had my first shift at McDonalds, so please don't think of me as a snob!
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    (Original post by HeavyTeddy)
    Job satisfaction a hundred times over. I couldn't bare going to work everyday knowing I'd be spending around 7 hours every week day being bored out of my mind.
    I can see exactly what you mean...It's just that I'm thinking that I will have the rest of the time that I am not at work to enjoy my money. I have seen the lifestyle that my parents can live, and definitely want to live it! I just don't know whether I would consider the lifestyle to be more important?
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    (Original post by glelin96)
    Well, I really don't want to sound like a snob, so please don't take it that way...My parents are both on very good salaries, with my Father being a QC, and owning businesses, and my Mother being a Judge. I have been brought up in an environment where money has been important. I don't know whether I would be able to live a lifestyle I have become accustomed to if I was to earn around £30000. I have however been brought up to be very independent, and today I had my first shift at McDonalds, so please don't think of me as a snob!
    I didn't think you were a snob per se, but calling a nurse's/police officer's salary 'very poor' displays a certain lack of awareness of the world around you. Then again, growing up in an environment like that, it's not altogether surprising.
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    (Original post by glelin96)
    I can see exactly what you mean...It's just that I'm thinking that I will have the rest of the time that I am not at work to enjoy my money. I have seen the lifestyle that my parents can live, and definitely want to live it! I just don't know whether I would consider the lifestyle to be more important?
    Nurse and police wages don't fall into the really poor category, try living on 12K pa. What you have to remember is that growing up in the household you did about 80% of salaries out there are going to seem poor.

    I think you need to look for a balance. If you go for a job that you both hate and may struggle with you are less likely reach the top of that career path and even if you do aren't going to have the time and energy to enjoy it.

    One of the keys ime is to avoid getting into unnecessary debt so live frugally in the early years so that you can build up savings and get a secure roof over your head.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    I didn't think you were a snob per se, but calling a nurse's/police officer's salary 'very poor' displays a certain lack of awareness of the world around you. Then again, growing up in an environment like that, it's not altogether surprising.
    Ok, I know that they have a salary that is above average, so I wouldn't say I have a lack of awareness of the world. I have seen both sides of it, as my parents have friends that are in elementary occupations, and live a fairly frugal lifestyle. I am just not sure as to whether or not I would be comfortable living such a life. I am somewhat envious of people that have been brought up in a family with an average income, as they won't have the feeling that they have let their parents down.
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    (Original post by glelin96)
    Ok, I know that they have a salary that is above average, so I wouldn't say I have a lack of awareness of the world. I have seen both sides of it, as my parents have friends that are in elementary occupations, and live a fairly frugal lifestyle. I am just not sure as to whether or not I would be comfortable living such a life. I am somewhat envious of people that have been brought up in a family with an average income, as they won't have the feeling that they have let their parents down.
    I don't know your parents but personally what I want for my children more than anything is for them to be happy and safe. Have your parents said anything about you letting them down?

    Personally I'd go for a career that you want to do, that you want to leave the house to do every day and concentrate on getting as far as you can along that career path. If your parents cannot be proud of you for excelling in your chosen career (providing it's not crime ) then they have the problem not you. Money is worthless if you are miserable.
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    (Original post by shonaT)
    If you go for a job that you both hate and may struggle with you are less likely reach the top of that career path and even if you do aren't going to have the time and energy to enjoy it.
    I agree with everything you said apart from this. My Father was able to pass through his entry exams to become a barrister. While he was undertaking pupillage, he was earning £25000, and that was over 25 years ago. As soon as he qualified at 23, he got a job in the CPS, and was earning £35000, again over 25 years ago. I don't believe that entry to the top of a profession is the important thing, as long as I could gain entry to a chambers to undertake pupillage, I would be happy with my prospects.
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    (Original post by shonaT)
    I don't know your parents but personally what I want for my children more than anything is for them to be happy and safe. Have your parents said anything about you letting them down?

    Personally I'd go for a career that you want to do, that you want to leave the house to do every day and concentrate on getting as far as you can along that career path. If your parents cannot be proud of you for excelling in your chosen career (providing it's not crime ) then they have the problem not you. Money is worthless if you are miserable.
    My parents have not once said anything about me or my siblings disappointing them. Both of my brothers are however older, being 25 and 28. Both of them have fair prospects, as one has become a barrister, and the other a Forensic Psychologist. I know that I would not have let them down. I know however that I would feel as though I had. After all, I have always had the ambition to be more successful than my parents, my Father in particular. I am starting to realise now, that is virtually impossible. :/
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    Usually to be really successful in a job you have to work very hard and have the motivation of loving your job to do get to a good pay, so best thing would be to do what you love and work up to the highest point which should have a good salary


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    (Original post by glelin96)
    My parents have not once said anything about me or my siblings disappointing them. Both of my brothers are however older, being 25 and 28. Both of them have fair prospects, as one has become a barrister, and the other a Forensic Psychologist. I know that I would not have let them down. I know however that I would feel as though I had. After all, I have always had the ambition to be more successful than my parents, my Father in particular. I am starting to realise now, that is virtually impossible. :/

    You can be more successful than your parents. There is more than one way to measure success and it doesn't necessarily have to be the same type of success as your parents. Sounds like you are being to hard on yourself. Remember you are you, not your parents, not your brothers but you and one measure of being successful is being true to yourself.

    If you really want to study law go for it but do it for yourself not just because your brother and parents did. Take what they have done out of the equation, decide what YOU want to do for the rest of your life and then go for it, work hard and do your best but go easy on yourself too, too much stress isn't healthy.
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    AAB are not poor grades. Give yourself some credit.

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    (Original post by shonaT)
    You can be more successful than your parents. There is more than one way to measure success and it doesn't necessarily have to be the same type of success as your parents. Sounds like you are being to hard on yourself. Remember you are you, not your parents, not your brothers but you and one measure of being successful is being true to yourself.

    If you really want to study law go for it but do it for yourself not just because your brother and parents did. Take what they have done out of the equation, decide what YOU want to do for the rest of your life and then go for it, work hard and do your best but go easy on yourself too, too much stress isn't healthy.

    Thankyou for that! Yes, I suppose I need to detach myself from them somewhat. I feel as though I would enjoy the career, I am just not sure whether I could meet the strenuous entry requirements, including getting very good A-level grades, a good degree, good work experience through internships and placements, and then getting entry onto a bar entry course, and then the most difficult, entry into pupillage. I feel that I could do it, I just don't know whether the stress I would have to go through would be worth it. I suppose this really has made me make up my mind against entry into law!
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    (Original post by Tokyoround)
    AAB are not poor grades. Give yourself some credit.

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    Maybe not as much poor grades as they are grades that close doors for entry into professions that I find desirable. :L I know they are certainly not the worst, just not the best... For entry onto a school leavers program into accountancy the requirements are generally BBB-ABB, the competition is generally fierce though, so hopefully they're good enough! Serious decision making needs to take place. A gap year is seeming even more attractive a time goes by!
 
 
 
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