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    Hi all

    I saw on the Oxford website that the standard offer for Mathematics is A*A*A, that the standard offer for the sciences is A*AA and for arts/humanities it is AAA.

    Why is this?
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    Because each school is different and each course is different. The Medical School at the collective Oxford colleges only asks for A*AA. Supposedly you can do the whole course with BBB knowledge levels and the right dedication. Perhaps the School of Mathematics thinks that you need at least AAA to do the course?
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    (Original post by jasmina10)
    Hi all

    I saw on the Oxford website that the standard offer for Mathematics is A*A*A, that the standard offer for the sciences is A*AA and for arts/humanities it is AAA.

    Why is this?
    The offer is higher for Maths because after monitoring their intake after the introduction of the A* Oxford saw that the overwhelming majority of their Maths freshers had achieved an A* in Maths and Further Maths, as quite frankly they don't pose much of a challenge for anyone good enough to study at the top universities for Maths. As such it made sense just to increase the standard offer seeing as everyone was getting those grades anyway. By contrast, people doing mainly humanities subjects did not overwhelmingly get an A*, probably because of the more subjective nature of the marking and so they didn't raise the offer.

    Not getting an A* in, say, French A level won't be that worrying for someone who wants to do French at uni - they could still do well at a top uni, but not getting an A* in Maths for someone wanting to do Maths at Cambridge/Oxford/Warwick/Imperial etc. is a lot more dodgy in my opinion.

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    (Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
    The offer is higher for Maths because after monitoring their intake after the introduction of the A* Oxford saw that the overwhelming majority of their Maths freshers had achieved an A* in Maths and Further Maths, as quite frankly they don't pose much of a challenge for anyone good enough to study at the top universities for Maths. As such it made sense just to increase the standard offer seeing as everyone was getting those grades anyway. By contrast, people doing mainly humanities subjects did not overwhelmingly get an A*, probably because of the more subjective nature of the marking and so they didn't raise the offer.

    Not getting an A* in, say, French A level won't be that worrying for someone who wants to do French at uni - they could still do well at a top uni, but not getting an A* in Maths for someone wanting to do Maths at Cambridge/Oxford/Warwick/Imperial etc. is a lot more dodgy in my opinion.

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    Not really because they wouldn't get in, in the first place!

    In fact somone on TSR got an offer of not only an A* but STEP for Computing at Imperial!
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    (Original post by dbkey)
    Not really because they wouldn't get in, in the first place!

    In fact somone on TSR got an offer of not only an A* but STEP for Computing at Imperial!
    Err that's exactly my point? Someone hoping to do Maths at those unis with just an A probably wouldn't be able to cope and the offers reflect this (i.e. need an A*).
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    Defined by college, contextual data, but also how much they want you until very recently, and they may still do Christs cambridge would offer 2 Es to the candidates they wanted the most.

    At my school there was a guy who everyone thought was borderline, he got an offer, but really high and in due course he missed it. System working right there.
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    (Original post by Azarimanka)
    Defined by college, contextual data, but also how much they want you until very recently, and they may still do Christs cambridge would offer 2 Es to the candidates they wanted the most.

    At my school there was a guy who everyone thought was borderline, he got an offer, but really high and in due course he missed it. System working right there.
    At Oxford, practically 100% of offers are the stated standard offer.
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    Oxford held off using the A* in offers for a few years after the new grade was introduced. The question you ask is an interesting one. The original proposal was to make the offer A*AA for all subjects - I don't know why this didn't happen.
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    Oxford held off using the A* in offers for a few years after the new grade was introduced. The question you ask is an interesting one. The original proposal was to make the offer A*AA for all subjects - I don't know why this didn't happen.
    I think it remains a lack of confidence on Oxford's part in teachers in arts subjects being able to accurately predict A* grades.
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    Oxford like to discriminate against people of a lower class

    That's why

    edit: I knew this would annoy people :awesome:
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    I think it remains a lack of confidence on Oxford's part in teachers in arts subjects being able to accurately predict A* grades.
    Of course the university can give offers to students not predicted the A*.

    So do you mean that the reason was because it could put students off applying if they didn't have A* predictions?

    An alternative hypothesis is there was a lack of confidence in the criteria for awarding the A* and/or the consistency of marking.
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    (Original post by upthegunners)
    Oxford like to discriminate against people of a lower class

    That's why
    How would that affect it?
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    (Original post by NinjaNerdfighter)
    How would that affect it?
    Because I found a piggy bank with smileys in it
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    Perhaps the Maths offers are higher because the applicants are typically taking very closely related subjects, e.g. Maths, Further Maths and Physics. Rather than the Humanities students who are typically taking a broader selection e.g. French, History and English Literature.

    So although Maths, Further Maths and Physics are recognised to be very difficult A-levels, but in that combination are not too bad as they supplement on another. Whereas with the Humanities you tend not to have subjects that are that closely related.

    This is probably not the case, but it might make an interesting point.
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    (Original post by fluteflute)
    Of course the university can give offers to students not predicted the A*.

    So do you mean that the reason was because it could put students off applying if they didn't have A* predictions?
    A combination of the two.

    Clearly it would be a leap of faith for an applicant to apply who was not predicted the standard offer and one that the applicant would probably be discourage by school and parents from doing.

    Although Oxofrd does put heavy emphasis on the interview and its own tests, an approach of making higher offers than predictions would effectively be to ignire predicetd grades entirely.

    An alternative hypothesis is there was a lack of confidence in the criteria for awarding the A* and/or the consistency of marking.
    It is an alternative view. It doesn't seem to be the one put forward but of course that may be to avoid annoying the exam boards. There are fewer of them and it would be more personal than saying "some teachers".
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    (Original post by AdamskiUK)
    The Medical School at the collective Oxford colleges only asks for A*AA. Supposedly you can do the whole course with BBB knowledge levels and the right dedication.
    Who says that..?
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    (Original post by Elles)
    Who says that..?

    If you think about it, the difference in knowledge between someone with an A in an A level subject and someone with a B is tiny. Moreover graduate entry medics arrive with GCSE level sciences, degree level knowledge of the history of Sino-Soviet relations, an A level appreciation of Heathcliffe's character and an ability to play the flute.

    The issue is whether the person concerned, regardless of their A level grades, is working at the limit of their intellectual ability or can be stretched further.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    ...Moreover graduate entry medics arrive with GCSE level sciences, degree level knowledge of the history of Sino-Soviet relations, an A level appreciation of Heathcliffe's character and an ability to play the flute....
    Not on the Oxford GEM course they don't!

    http://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/med...medical-course

    Although I note that they do now say "in a few years we hope to be able to consider applications from graduates in a wider range of subjects" I'm a smidgen sceptical as to how much wider it'll go in reality. Or it'll be those arty degree types who also happen to have science Al evels/OU type qualifications.
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    (Original post by Elles)
    Not on the Oxford GEM course they don't!

    http://www.medsci.ox.ac.uk/study/med...medical-course

    Although I note that they do now say "in a few years we hope to be able to consider applications from graduates in a wider range of subjects" I'm a smidgen sceptical as to how much wider it'll go in reality. Or it'll be those arty degree types who also happen to have science Al evels/OU type qualifications.
    Have you looked at the Human Sciences admissions requirements and syllabus lately? I am not that far off.
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    (Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
    Err that's exactly my point? Someone hoping to do Maths at those unis with just an A probably wouldn't be able to cope and the offers reflect this (i.e. need an A*).
    I applied to Cambridge Maths with 'just an A' and got an offer.
    A*AA in Maths, Further Maths Physics + 1,1 in STEP.
    In theory I could've got in with AA from Maths and Further Maths.
 
 
 
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