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    Do you season your chicken if so what with?
    Or do you just go tesco and shove it in the oven when your ready to roast it.

    My mums boyfriend is English and said before he met her he never seasoned his chicken and just put it in the oven. Now he wouldn't dare have plain chicken.

    I'm from a Caribbean background and growing up and even now we would say that white people (no race war please) don't season there chicken or meat.

    So does you or your family season their chicken?
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    (Original post by Muckoz)
    Do you season your chicken if so what with?
    Or do you just go tesco and shove it in the oven when your ready to roast it.

    My mums boyfriend is English and said before he met her he never seasoned his chicken and just put it in the oven. Now he wouldn't dare have plain chicken.

    I'm from a Caribbean background and growing up and even now we would say that white people (no race war please) don't season there chicken or meat.

    So does you or your family season their chicken?
    We've always done it in our house, whether that's bog standard salt and pepper or more "elaborate" things. My go-to is butter under the skin, salt and pepper on top, and half a lemon and a few cloves of garlic in the cavity.
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    Im from the caribbean and I season my chicken as well. Onion, garlic, paprika, bell peppers, parsley, chopped up really finely and salt, pepper. Thats the usual
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    Probably salt and pepper, if anything. Though the xmas turkey gets butter, pepper, bacon and oranges when I'm in control :p:
    I think it only really affects the surface of the meat, which is why I don't bother too much. I've not done a proper test of this so I could be wrong.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    We've always done it in our house, whether that's bog standard salt and pepper or more "elaborate" things. My go-to is butter under the skin, salt and pepper on top, and half a lemon and a few cloves of garlic in the cavity.
    For some reason, I couldn't help but chuckle at this
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    We've always done it in our house, whether that's bog standard salt and pepper or more "elaborate" things. My go-to is butter under the skin, salt and pepper on top, and half a lemon and a few cloves of garlic in the cavity.
    Please may I come to your house for chicken?
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    (Original post by amyshamblesxx)
    Please may I come to your house for chicken?
    The oven in the flat I'm lodging in is terrible, so no chicken roasting for me at the moment :ashamed2: On the plus side, more opportunities to do different things with steak, I'm making this tonight :jive:

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    (Original post by Manitude)
    Probably salt and pepper, if anything. Though the xmas turkey gets butter, pepper, bacon and oranges when I'm in control :p:
    I think it only really affects the surface of the meat, which is why I don't bother too much. I've not done a proper test of this so I could be wrong.
    nah man you got to get involved with the chicken. get the knife and stab the chicken and insert seasoning into the meat not the skin. get real into it.

    Today I had one of them ready to oven seasoned chickens from waitrose had a slab of bacon on top.

    one of the most bland pieces of chickens i've ever had. told mum next time don't be lazy and buy a chicken and season it yourself.

    Top tip: Always season your chicken the day before.

    (Original post by Gofre)
    The oven in the flat I'm lodging in is terrible, so no chicken roasting for me at the moment :ashamed2: On the plus side, more opportunities to do different things with steak, I'm making this tonight :jive:
    How did it taste?

    I think steak is the only thing what doesn't need much seasoning. I agree with the english on that it only needs some salt and pepper.
    Another thing I grew up with is why do these "white people" love there meat (steak and lamb) rare. "They don't even cook the meat properly". It wasn't until about 3 years ago I first tasted a rare steak. I haven't looked back I will never have a steak what isn't rare or medium rare if I have a choice.. Still some of my friends are adamant they cook the steak proper and well done and thats the only way.
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    (Original post by Muckoz)
    How did it taste?

    I think steak is the only thing what doesn't need much seasoning. I agree with the english on that it only needs some salt and pepper.
    Pretty good. As a sauce and a means of cooking the onions, awesome, I'll use that as a side/sauce again in the future for definite. Don't think I'll be marinading steak again though, it served to remind me that I'm very much a purist when it comes to cooking steak. Still tasted good, I'd have just preferred a well seasoned ribeye with possibly some herb butter basted over at the end or just placed on top to melt when plating. Will definitely be giving it a go with pork though, it's such a bland meat (Certain cuts aside) it needs as much flavour putting into it as possible.


    Another thing I grew up with is why do these "white people" love there meat (steak and lamb) rare. "They don't even cook the meat properly". It wasn't until about 3 years ago I first tasted a rare steak. I haven't looked back I will never have a steak what isn't rare or medium rare if I have a choice.. Still some of my friends are adamant they cook the steak proper and well done and thats the only way.
    I never ever have steak cooked past medium (may as well have roast beef), but never found myself wanting to order it rare. Ended up getting given a very undercooked steak at a restaurant, and thought I'd give a go. I, like you, have never looked back. Give it to me rare or not at all!
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    (Original post by Muckoz)
    nah man you got to get involved with the chicken. get the knife and stab the chicken and insert seasoning into the meat not the skin. get real into it.

    Today I had one of them ready to oven seasoned chickens from waitrose had a slab of bacon on top.

    one of the most bland pieces of chickens i've ever had. told mum next time don't be lazy and buy a chicken and season it yourself.

    Top tip: Always season your chicken the day before.
    Not a bad idea, actually.
    Normally when I get roasting meat I get it because it's reduced to clear, so leaving it overnight is a good way of getting ill!
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    With a Nigerian mum and a (albeit vegan) Jamaican dad, I learnt how to season my chicken real good :afro:
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    Pretty good. As a sauce and a means of cooking the onions, awesome, I'll use that as a side/sauce again in the future for definite. Don't think I'll be marinading steak again though, it served to remind me that I'm very much a purist when it comes to cooking steak. Will definitely be giving it a go with pork though, it's such a bland meat (Certain cuts aside) it needs as much flavour putting into it as possible.
    Good to hear.

    I use all the chicken stock left from a chicken to season my next meat sometimes. I eat alot of meat nh.

    Jerk seasoning in pork is so good. If you don't mind spicy food try that on pork. Its all I season my pork with now tbh.
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    I was unaware until today that people didn't season their chicken! :eek: What do these people have for dinner? A plate of tuna and some chips?
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    (Original post by WJB440)
    I was unaware until today that people didn't season their chicken! :eek: What do these people have for dinner? A plate of tuna and some chips?
    Fish fingers, beans , chips. Is actually a common meal.
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    (Original post by Muckoz)
    Fish fingers, beans , chips. Is actually a common meal.
    So is chicken but I would have thought it infrequent unseasoned. I was more highlighting how people could eat something enjoyable however they air on the side of slackness
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    (Original post by Muckoz)
    I'm from a Caribbean background and growing up and even now we would say that white people (no race war please) don't season there chicken or meat.
    It is kind of true. I think an appreciation for food and flavour is a really recent thing in British culture. Generally, the British way was to serve up a load of palatable stodge just for the sake of getting the food down your neck that you need to live. A lot of people don't really care too much about what they eat in terms of how well flavoured it is and so forth and I don't really think there is anything wrong with it.

    With me, I sometimes like to try new things or actually take the bother to, for example, season chicken or make some nice sauce or accompaniments but to be honest - most of the time, I really just don't care. As long as it tastes ok rather than particularly nice, that is good enough for me.

    My missus is from abroad and she was really shocked by this attitude at first. Like your family, her family always want to make sure every goddamn bit of food they eat is seasoned or prepared to the highest standard. Horses for courses really.
 
 
 
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