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    Hi everyone,

    I'm considering the following two programs:

    - Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Management, at Imperial
    - Computing & Internet Systems, at King's College

    I did my BSc. in Computer Science but am interested in going in to management and maybe starting my own company in a while, which is the motivation for my interest in the program at Imperial.

    As an international student, I'm not really sure about the career prospects for either of the two. Imperial are not really known for business studies and Computer Science doesn't seem to be King's strongest subject. So in terms of career prospects, which one do you think I'll benefit the most from?

    I'm not basing my decision solely on career prospects, but some insights and/or advice would definitely help me.

    Thanks!
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    If your ultimate goal is to start your own business, then you need to choose the one which will take you there. A career - working for someone else - is just a short-term goal. From what you've said, career prospects should take second place to getting the qualification which will best set you up to start your own company.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    If your ultimate goal is to start your own business, then you need to choose the one which will take you there. A career - working for someone else - is just a short-term goal. From what you've said, career prospects should take second place to getting the qualification which will best set you up to start your own company.
    This isn't very convincing to me to be honest. At the end of the day, if you're starting your own business, then the qualifications you have are irrelevant. The qualification is to demonstrate to potential employers that you have a certain aptitude, but if you're your own employer then you're demonstrating your own aptitude to yourself? It's silly. At the end of the day, a qualification isn't going to take you to 'start your own business', your passion, confidence, and determination will.

    OP, if you are dead set on starting your own business, have done your research, know what you are doing and have confidence in that, then your money is probably better spent injecting into your own start-up. You can easily study more in the future should you desire to, and you'll certainly have more disposable income to do so with from your business.
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    (Original post by Magnum Opus)
    This isn't very convincing to me to be honest. At the end of the day, if you're starting your own business, then the qualifications you have are irrelevant. The qualification is to demonstrate to potential employers that you have a certain aptitude, but if you're your own employer then you're demonstrating your own aptitude to yourself? It's silly. At the end of the day, a qualification isn't going to take you to 'start your own business', your passion, confidence, and determination will.

    OP, if you are dead set on starting your own business, have done your research, know what you are doing and have confidence in that, then your money is probably better spent injecting into your own start-up. You can easily study more in the future should you desire to, and you'll certainly have more disposable income to do so with from your business.
    In the case of the Imperial course, it's not about getting a qualification, but about the course content which will give a grounding in management theory and entrepreneurship - vital for anyone wishing to start their own business.

    The King's course would also give skills, but would be more focussed on a specific type of industry job rather than going it alone.

    Getting a degree needn't necessarily be a box-ticking exercise to get a qualification which impresses a future employer (although I grant you that many are). Sometimes they're actually about learning things.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    In the case of the Imperial course, it's not about getting a qualification, but about the course content which will give a grounding in management theory and entrepreneurship - vital for anyone wishing to start their own business.

    The King's course would also give skills, but would be more focussed on a specific type of industry job rather than going it alone.

    Getting a degree needn't necessarily be a box-ticking exercise to get a qualification which impresses a future employer (although I grant you that many are). Sometimes they're actually about learning things.
    Sorry but I never said that degrees were merely a box ticking exercise, let alone implied there is no learning involved, or life skills to be gained. Why would I be studying otherwise?

    In the grand scheme of things, however, a degree will do little to help you start your own business. The fact that a very significant proportion of entrepreneurs start their own highly successful businesses without even completing their undergraduate courses attests to that. It is important not to erroneously prioritize things when it comes to time and investment.

    The OP needs hard, practical experience if they're to achieve their desires, not inapplicable theory which they spend £21,000 doing on fees alone..
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    (Original post by Magnum Opus)
    Sorry but I never said that degrees were merely a box ticking exercise, let alone implied there is no learning involved, or life skills to be gained. Why would I be studying otherwise?

    In the grand scheme of things, however, a degree will do little to help you start your own business. The fact that a very significant proportion of entrepreneurs start their own highly successful businesses without even completing their undergraduate courses attests to that. It is important not to erroneously prioritize things when it comes to time and investment.

    The OP needs hard, practical experience if they're to achieve their desires, not inapplicable theory which they spend £21,000 doing on fees alone..
    With a husband who has been involved in mentoring/advising small business owners, let me add this: while a high proportion of successful entrepreneurs may have dropped out of uni etc, there are a huge amount of entrepreneurs who fail at their businesses. In my husband's experience, the primary reason for this is because while they may have a good idea for a product or service, they don't know much about running a business, managing the finances, staff, product lines etc. So I think Klix's point is actually a good one. Whether the OP needs to spend a fortune at Imperial specifically to get that training is another question however.
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    Thank you for all the answers. As a short input to your answers, the MSc. at Imperial is very similar to their MSc. in Management, preparing non-business students for management careers and not necessarily for the purpose of "starting one's own business".

    I now realized that my phrasing of the initial question does not seem very well considered. Personal goals aside, I guess what I really wanted to know was the reputation of the two departments at respective universities, seen from an employers perspective. I didn't want to turn this into one of those "This uni. vs. that uni."-threads, but I guess, in the end, that it's what my concerns are actually all about.
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    I guess prestige, reputation and profile-wise, Imperial is the most likely to be known amongst employers.
 
 
 
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