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    I'm aware that students (at least for the maths course, not sure about other ones) have to take a minimum of 120 CATS per year, and can gain additional credit for taking more than the usual 120. I've heard that this system is being taken away from the beginning of the next academic year, i.e. taking more than 120 won't advantage you.

    I've looked here http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/a...proval/credit/ under section 4, and the bit there under '(For students commencing undergraduate courses of study from Autumn 2013)' - but I don't really understand what it's saying. Can anyone confirm whether this system is being taken away?
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    (Original post by dj89)
    I'm aware that students (at least for the maths course, not sure about other ones) have to take a minimum of 120 CATS per year, and can gain additional credit for taking more than the usual 120. I've heard that this system is being taken away from the beginning of the next academic year, i.e. taking more than 120 won't advantage you.

    I've looked here http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/a...proval/credit/ under section 4, and the bit there under '(For students commencing undergraduate courses of study from Autumn 2013)' - but I don't really understand what it's saying. Can anyone confirm whether this system is being taken away?

    As far as I'm aware, yes, this system is being removed. The main driving reason behind this was because it was primarily maths (and, to some extent, computer science and physics) that would take advantage of the Seymour Formula (as it's so called). It was found that almost 100% of maths students took more than 120 CATs, whereas other degrees, such as chemistry and engineering, taking more than 120 CATs was only permitted in the last year. This system allows you to overcat and have a bias towards higher grades (so, if you took 150 CATs, you might only need a 65% average (a 2.1) to get a first class classification for example). In a review, this was seen as unfair, especially towards humanities (for some reason), but more so because it favoured volume of work over quality of work, which undermines the academic rigour of a degree. It essentially lessens the risk of getting bad marks if you take more modules, which, the academic standards agency argues, is unfair.
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    (Original post by Nirgilis)
    As far as I'm aware, yes, this system is being removed. The main driving reason behind this was because it was primarily maths (and, to some extent, computer science and physics) that would take advantage of the Seymour Formula (as it's so called). It was found that almost 100% of maths students took more than 120 CATs, whereas other degrees, such as chemistry and engineering, taking more than 120 CATs was only permitted in the last year. This system allows you to overcat and have a bias towards higher grades (so, if you took 150 CATs, you might only need a 65% average (a 2.1) to get a first class classification for example). In a review, this was seen as unfair, especially towards humanities (for some reason), but more so because it favoured volume of work over quality of work, which undermines the academic rigour of a degree. It essentially lessens the risk of getting bad marks if you take more modules, which, the academic standards agency argues, is unfair.
    That's actually a good point - I was wondering what the reasons were for removing it. Most of the stuff I had heard was arguments for keeping it.
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    As far as I'm aware, Seymour is being removed for all students entering in 2013. The exact reasons for removal are probably hiding in the minutes of some meeting, somewhere, but I can't find them (assuming the reason exists online).

    However, I think that a different system is going to be put in place that means that taking additional modules will not disadvantage you (with the exception of having to do more work), but the bonus element will be significantly reduced.

    I'm sure that Warwick will explain it all when you get there in September
 
 
 
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