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Has Modern Society Suppressed Intellectual Curiosity In Our Young? Watch

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    Ever since I was born, my parents intensely encouraged me to go beyond what was taught at school. They encouraged me to read and explore far and wide. In short, they upheld the doctrine of intellectual curiosity.

    In the past, without so much technology and social media and whatnot, alongside general face-to-face socialising, young people would also "study" different things on their own (in other words, extra-curricular "study"). But they did not look upon it as "study" (as we modern youngsters would), it was an exploration which satiated their intellectual curiosity. An example would be Einstein, who worked upon issues of Physics in his spare time whilst he was a clerk. Nowadays, many in their spare time would "watch telly" or generally not explore further. But some still do.

    TL;DR

    In short, do you think that modern life/society is suppressing intellectual curiosity? Or, on the contrary, has the dawn of the internet actually increased intellectual curiosity (certainly I myself can say that it has helped in satiating my insatiable curiosities)?

    What do you think?
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    The short answer is yes.
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    I think it has increased curiosity, but made people less intellectual.

    People no longer have the drive to properly learn about things any more. Whereas you used to have to go to the local library and take out books on a subject if you were interested in it, nowadays you just find a brief summary on the internet (usually written by an biased amateur on Wikipedia) and satisfy your short-term inquisitiveness. Recent studies have shown that if you assume you will later have access to something on the internet, when you look it up you forget what it is soon afterwards, and only remember where to find it if you need it again. The modern desire for easy-access information has meant that there is no longer any perceived value in taking the time to become properly engaged in a subject, whatever it is. This isn't helped by modern forms of entertainment, as people move away from books and towards videos and video games that are a lot more short-term and instantly gratifying.
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    No, I disagree. It's easier to "study" now because of the Internet. I highly doubt young people our age in the 1960s or 70s were debating deep questions like this, for example. No, they were getting married and buying houses.

    The Internet has been completely revolutionary for the enfranchisement of the average man and woman.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    No, I disagree. It's easier to "study" now because of the Internet. I highly doubt young people our age in the 1960s or 70s were debating deep questions like this, for example. No, they were getting married and buying houses.

    The Internet has been completely revolutionary for the enfranchisement of the average man and woman.
    Yeah, but we aren't any more intelligent for it. You'll have forgotten this by tomorrow.
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    so many young folk have outsourced their brains to google & wikipedia...
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    I dont want to sound pretentious or arrogant but sometimes I just feel like I want to have a proper conversation with someone about something we've both read about or studied, be proper nerds/geeks and chat/debate about it. At uni I feel like I want to seek out new things, I want to learn, which is making me worried for when I finish and I go off to work which wont involve academic learning (necessarily)! Ill probably still pick up a book on something new just to keep me interested. I also do sometimes wonder how so many people can do badly or fail at their coursework when we have so much access to things now compared to before where it was a case of going to a library and having to fight over the few books which were available. Its also a bit mad how there are so many intelligent people from the past who obviously didnt have the internet and yet they were far more intelligent than the majority of people today, so if they managed it, why cant we if we have it so much easier to access? its probably because in the past people had a desire to learn and explore and discover whereas now young people are disinterested. theres no motivation behind learning for a lot of people, its purely seen as "Ill get this degree to get a high paying job so i can have flashy items so I can look good and impress everyone and fit in".
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    I think the desire to learn is somewhat crushed by the internet in our pocket

    I've often asked myself "Why bother learning a language when there's Google Translate?!" as much as I'm ashamed to say it.
 
 
 
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