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    Hey,

    I am considering taking up Maths next year for a 4th AS Level at college (I am dropping almost all of my current AS Levels next year) and was wondering how people find it? Relatively difficult/not so bad etc. My friend has shown me some of the stuff she's done and It didn't seem too difficult really. I got a B in GCSE so I can't see why I'd struggle massively.

    Graphs are the only thing in there that would drive me through the roof though, I can't stand them but I'd learn to adjust.

    Anyway, good option to take or not?
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    Maths is a very nice subject go for it! Looks all good for nearly all jobs and future work. I'm doing AS at the moment it's ok, I find the applied module a lot harder than c1/2.

    Btw for graphs just do x/y=0 and standard shape. For as, you won't need to do extremely detailed every axis graphs


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    Hey,

    I got an A at GCSE and I found it/find it quite tough. I'd say, if it isn't absolutely necessary, think twice. Especially if all your others are enablers.

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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Hey,

    I am considering taking up Maths next year for a 4th AS Level at college (I am dropping almost all of my current AS Levels next year) and was wondering how people find it? Relatively difficult/not so bad etc. My friend has shown me some of the stuff she's done and It didn't seem too difficult really. I got a B in GCSE so I can't see why I'd struggle massively.

    Graphs are the only thing in there that would drive me through the roof though, I can't stand them but I'd learn to adjust.

    Anyway, good option to take or not?
    I don't want to discourage you and would say go for it if you think you are capable but you appear to think it could be a fairly easy option. It won't be.

    Why did you get a B grade at GCSE? Were you pleased with it or disappointed that you didn't do better? What kind of A level grade would would hope to achieve?

    B grade at GCSE is not good preparation for A level maths. Students tend to be weak at the algebra and trigonometry topics that are vital for A level progress. Teachers have masses of data that show while some B grade students do go on to achieve a good A level grade, the majority do not - those who do have to work incredibly hard and there was usually a reason why their GCSE performance didn't truly reflect their ability.

    You have done little maths for more than a year so will be very rusty. If you are still at your original school, talk to your old maths teacher about whether they think you are a good candidate for A level. If you do go ahead use the summer holidays to get your skills up to the required level (e.g. work with a friend or get a tutor).
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    (Original post by bolshymeangirl)
    Hey,

    I got an A at GCSE and I found it/find it quite tough. I'd say, if it isn't absolutely necessary, think twice. Especially if all your others are enablers.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What do you mean by 'enablers'. I have a vague idea what you mean.

    (Original post by gdunne42)
    I don't want to discourage you and would say go for it if you think you are capable but you appear to think it could be a fairly easy option. It won't be.

    Why did you get a B grade at GCSE? Were you pleased with it or disappointed that you didn't do better? What kind of A level grade would would hope to achieve?

    B grade at GCSE is not good preparation for A level maths. Students tend to be weak at the algebra and trigonometry topics that are vital for A level progress. Teachers have masses of data that show while some B grade students do go on to achieve a good A level grade, the majority do not - those who do have to work incredibly hard and there was usually a reason why their GCSE performance didn't truly reflect their ability.

    You have done little maths for more than a year so will be very rusty. If you are still at your original school, talk to your old maths teacher about whether they think you are a good candidate for A level. If you do go ahead use the summer holidays to get your skills up to the required level (e.g. work with a friend or get a tutor).
    Bold 1 = I was pleased and disappointed at the same time. I was pleased because I knew I had made a few errors here and there in the maths exam and felt quite glad those few errors in the final exam hadn't dragged the grade down too much (I think it actually brought it up anyway hm). I was disappointed because I felt I could have done better if I had just had a little more motivation in the subject back in school - I disliked the teacher's teaching method and the classroom 'environment' was less than ideal for actually learning something.

    As for A Level grade, I'd aim for a B/A but wouldn't be massively disappointed at a C.

    Bold 2 = I am not at my old school, started college in September. I will ask my friend for help on maths because trigonometry was one of my poorer areas at school (iirc) and I would definitely use the summer to get back up to scratch - certainly takes its toll when you don't learn a subject for a year+.

    You haven't discouraged me massively, I thank you for giving a straight-up answer

    Ty for all replies so far.
 
 
 
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