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    Hi!
    I am interested in taking a MSc in Medical Phycics... Since am from Greece, I would like to have some help choosing a university in UK. I'm thinking about:
    1) MSc Physics and Engineering in Medicine in University College of London or
    2) MSc in Biomedical Engineering in the Imperial College


    Both have Medical Phycics streams and sound very intresting to me.

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    Hi

    I did the Biomedical Engineering with Medical Physics course at Imperial College 5 years ago. Its quite a good course but they tend to squeeze in a lot of bioengineering and medical physics modules to give you an all round knowledge which tends to get quite intense. The department has a big biomechanics focus and they do tend to take in a lot of students ( some of the classes can have upto 70-80 students). However, there is a lot less practical involvement and the modules are very theoretical ( something I did not like very much). The one at UCL tends to be more 'famous' and well known, especially for people who want to get work in the NHS. I am not sure about the content of this course though but from what I think it has a lot less engineering ( if you choose the medical physics stream). Have you considered the course at Kings College London , i think its called 'Medical Engineering and Physics' (If I could go back in time, I would have preferred to do that course instead of the one at Imperial) and I believe it is quite 'hands on' . What do you wan to do after your MSc i.e. work in academia, hospital or industry ? Note : If you want to work in hospitals in the UK , you have to undertake a training programme which involves a mandatory MSc ( paid for by the employer) even if you have done one before. So you may want to consider that , if you want to work in a hospital.
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    Hi, I applied to the courses you guys mentioned. If you're after a programme with more practical content, wouldn't an MRes degree be better? Not sure if they existed five years ago though.
    If you don't mind my asking... What did you do after finishing at Imperial? Job in NHS? Further studies?
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    (Original post by evermind)
    Hi, I applied to the courses you guys mentioned. If you're after a programme with more practical content, wouldn't an MRes degree be better? Not sure if they existed five years ago though.
    If you don't mind my asking... What did you do after finishing at Imperial? Job in NHS? Further studies?

    I am currently working in the NHS as a physicist but looking to do a PhD this September. The course at Imperial did help me to get my current job because of the contacts I made and I also did an MSc project in a hospital based department. However, they did not offer that many Medical Physics related projects ( there were only 2 offered which were based in a hospital). The department at Imperial has a big engineering focus especially biomechanics, neuroscience related stuff, biomaterials etc . A lot of people from my course ended up doing PhDs as I don't think it was very easy to get jobs in those fields and at the time I graduated it was a real nightmare getting jobs ( I had to wait 5 months before doing a short stint at a company before my post in the NHS). Also , the procedure for getting into the NHS has currently changed which means people getting posts need to do a mandatory part time MSc whilst working ( even though they have done an MSc before). Previously, you could do an accredited MSc before ( Imperial, UCL and Kings used to be accredited) which is what i did and not have to worry about doing it again whilst on the job.
    The thing is most employers are keen on the skills you gain during your degree and evidence of applying them to a practical task e.g. you may do a course in statistics, programming, signal/image processing, medical imaging etc but they are looking for evidence of applying it to a project rather than just learning stuff and doing an exam in it. Thats why i believe courses with a lot of coursework, group projects, involvement with the NHS ( if people are looking to get into the NHS) or industry are more useful for developing useful skills for your CV rather than the typical MSc.....its just a problem with the British system and the way most MScs are structured i.e. they are not that 'hands on'. This was my experience 5 years ago, they might have changed now ?
    I don't think the single year MRes was that common 5 years ago, it would probably be part of a 4 year PhD programme or something. Also, I think an MRes would be more focussed on research and hence be restrictive in terms of getting jobs in other sectors.
 
 
 
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