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    I am an international student and I got accepted to MSc CS in University of Edinburgh. Moreover I am planning to do a PHD when I finish my MSc.

    I can afford my self for only one year at UoE.

    So how hard is it to get a funded PHD in UoE if you have done your MSc in UoE and graduated top 5% or 10% of your class?

    It would be great if a computer science student from UoE shared his insight.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Xang)
    I am an international student and I got accepted to MSc CS in University of Edinburgh. Moreover I am planning to do a PHD when I finish my MSc.

    I can afford my self for only one year at UoE.

    So how hard is it to get a funded PHD in UoE if you have done your MSc in UoE and graduated top 5% or 10% of your class?

    It would be great if a computer science student from UoE shared his insight.

    Thanks
    It will depend entirely on what funding they have for international students next year. It is not enough simply to be top of your class. There will be top students from other universities too. Likewise, your own nationality influences what funding is available (e.g. if you are a commonwealth student). Look at this page for a rough guide.
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    Thank you for the reply. But isn't the school of informatics at Edinburgh one of the largest in the UK?

    If so then they should have plenty of Teaching and Research
    assistantship positions. If so shouldnt funding be easy to get? Or are these positions reserved for UK students only?
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    I think class ranks are more of a US phenomenon. I don't know about Scottish university but at English universities these things generally aren't even published.

    Funding in the UK is generally poor for internationals. Most PhD funding comes from research councils and is not based on students working as researchers or teachers, but it is restricted to citizen residents. Again you're assuming that British universities work just the same as US universities and they don't.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    I think class ranks are more of a US phenomenon. I don't know about Scottish university but at English universities these things generally aren't even published.

    Funding in the UK is generally poor for internationals. Most PhD funding comes from research councils and is not based on students working as researchers or teachers, but it is restricted to citizen residents. Again you're assuming that British universities work just the same as US universities and they don't.
    Great. Many thanks for your reply. I guess I will be going to Waterloo not Edinburgh then.

    btw because of poor funding opportunities UK universities are loosing good students.
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    (Original post by Xang)
    Great. Many thanks for your reply. I guess I will be going to Waterloo not Edinburgh then.

    btw because of poor funding opportunities UK universities are loosing good students.
    It's viewed a different way here. PhDs are regarded much like undergraduate education: the person getting the PhD is the one who benefits, so if PhDs are funded by tax, why should people who don't pay tax in the UK be able to compete for the funding? Would Canada or the US pay for a British person's undergraduate degree in their country? Why should they?

    In the US it seems to be regarded more like a job the purpose of which is to produce research for the benefit of the university. The university in that case doesn't care about the nationality of the employee, quite rightly.

    I am not sure which approach is better; it's a rather fundamental disagreement about what a PhD is for.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    [...] Funding in the UK is generally poor for internationals. Most PhD funding comes from research councils and is not based on students working as researchers or teachers, but it is restricted to citizen residents. Again you're assuming that British universities work just the same as US universities and they don't.
    I cannot accept that funding for international students is poor. With the exception of research council funding, which can also go to European students (fees only), all other funding is open to international students and there are dedicated scholarships to attract international students. British students are the ones who get hard done by. That is why there are so few of us at postgraduate level.

    (Original post by Xang)
    Thank you for the reply. But isn't the school of informatics at Edinburgh one of the largest in the UK?

    If so then they should have plenty of Teaching and Research
    assistantship positions. If so shouldnt funding be easy to get? Or are these positions reserved for UK students only?
    No funding is easy to get. I am sorry if you have been led to believe so.

    (Original post by Xang)
    Great. Many thanks for your reply. I guess I will be going to Waterloo not Edinburgh then.

    btw because of poor funding opportunities UK universities are loosing good students.
    You are just being silly now.

    The page I linked had plenty of funding opportunities exclusively for international students if you cared to look. You are dismissing Edinburgh on the basis of a lack of funding you have not even be awarded. It is also worth keeping in mind that funding opportunities the other way around - for example, for British students to study China - are non-existent. If you think you are going to be in a better position in another English-speaking country like America or Canada then you are in for a shock.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Would Canada or the US pay for a British person's undergraduate degree in their country? Why should they
    Why not. If you can get the brightest students in the UK and move them to the US or Canada then that would benefit US and Canada in the long run.

    I am not saying that the UK should fund every international student I am saying that they should at least try to provide funding to the distinguished international students.

    They should try to attract talents... not scare them away.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    I cannot accept that funding for international students is poor. With the exception of research council funding, which can also go to European students (fees only), all other funding is open to international students and there are dedicated scholarships to attract international students. British students are the ones who get hard done by. That is why there are so few of us at postgraduate level.
    All other funding being a small minority of total funding.

    And sure EU citizens get fees (only because it is illegal for the British government not to do this) but fees-only isn't livable and it certainly isn't internationally competitive in sciences.
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    (Original post by Xang)
    If so then they should have plenty of Teaching and Research assistantship positions.
    This is again more of a US rather than UK phenomenon. Whilst UK PhD students can pick up odd bits of teaching or marking, there aren't any reliable jobs as such, unless you go part-time and compete for them in the open job market. Certainly the work available to me in my department is ad hoc and I wouldn't want to rely on it as a source of income. Vacancies in a university aren't specifically allocated for PhD students in that university. The Research Assistant vacancies available in my department over the past year have been fixed-term (max of six months, usually less) and full-time, which wouldn't be compatible with PhD research as it runs here.

    In the UK, academic experience such as lecturing or marking is seen as being for the benefit of the research student, as it adds to their CV. This is again part of the difference between the US and UK university systems.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    This is again more of a US rather than UK phenomenon. Whilst UK PhD students can pick up odd bits of teaching or marking, there aren't any reliable jobs as such, unless you go part-time and compete for them in the open job market. Certainly the work available to me in my department is ad hoc and I wouldn't want to rely on it as a source of income. Vacancies in a university aren't specifically allocated for PhD students in that university. The Research Assistant vacancies available in my department over the past year have been fixed-term (max of six months, usually less) and full-time, which wouldn't be compatible with PhD research as it runs here.

    In the UK, academic experience such as lecturing or marking is seen as being for the benefit of the research student, as it adds to their CV. This is again part of the difference between the US and UK university systems.
    Thank you for the information.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    All other funding being a small minority of total funding.

    And sure EU citizens get fees (only because it is illegal for the British government not to do this) but fees-only isn't livable and it certainly isn't internationally competitive in sciences.
    That is simply not true at all. Take the modern languages department at my local university. They have AHRC awards open to European students, a one-off teaching assistantship open to anyone, International Postgraduate Scholarship only open to international students, Overseas Research Scholarship only open to international students, and various Santander funding awards (only one of which British students can apply for). All but one of the awards is open to international students, and most are exclusively for international students...

    British universities have lots of funding open to international students. Other countries do not. The likes of Holland and Sweden have generous studentships, but they do not come along very often. Britain has awards every single year. If the OP thinks he has a better chance of securing funding in Canada then he is wrong. America and Britain offer him the best chance, each with slightly different aims. For instance, he will find lots of American departments will not even give him an offer if they decide they cannot fund him, or they will only part-fund him through a much longer PhD programme.
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    Funding for a PhD is incredibly competitive and most of it is only open to UK students (EU students can sometimes get a fees-only studentship). International studentships are even more competitive as these are usually open to everyone - UK, EU and overseas so you are competing with far more people. I've seen a few for overseas students only but these are rare.

    In my subject area, funding mainly comes from research councils and charities which in turn come from UK taxpayers and citizens. It makes no sense to fund many international students from our own money when there are already a lot of talented UK students who struggle to get funding for a PhD.

    Try www.findaphd.com to search for potential studentships.
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    (Original post by Xang)
    Why not. If you can get the brightest students in the UK and move them to the US or Canada then that would benefit US and Canada in the long run.

    I am not saying that the UK should fund every international student I am saying that they should at least try to provide funding to the distinguished international students.

    They should try to attract talents... not scare them away.
    As an international, let me observe that for funding to "attract international talent" when the immigration rules make it pretty difficult for that talent to stay in the country after graduation, doesn't really make a lot of sense either...

    But you should perhaps cast your net wider than Edinburgh looking for funding then. "Distinguished" international students might find their PhDs funded through Gates, Clarendon, Rhodes etc scholarships...
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    My department (engineering) gets a few hundred applications from china and India each year and only 2 of these are funded. Most of the asian guys are funded via their governments, is this not an option for you?
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    Regarding Edinburgh specifically, I think you need to speak to your department if possible, since they may have suggestions for what funding you'd be eligible for. There should be a director of PGR admissions, and it's probably worth asking them nicely if they'd mind talking to you about it.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    That is simply not true at all. Take the modern languages department at my local university. They have AHRC awards open to European students, a one-off teaching assistantship open to anyone, International Postgraduate Scholarship only open to international students, Overseas Research Scholarship only open to international students, and various Santander funding awards (only one of which British students can apply for). All but one of the awards is open to international students, and most are exclusively for international students...
    Maybe that's the case in humanities where there's very little funding to start with, but the OP was talking about science.

    British universities have lots of funding open to international students. Other countries do not. The likes of Holland and Sweden have generous studentships, but they do not come along very often. Britain has awards every single year. If the OP thinks he has a better chance of securing funding in Canada then he is wrong. America and Britain offer him the best chance, each with slightly different aims. For instance, he will find lots of American departments will not even give him an offer if they decide they cannot fund him, or they will only part-fund him through a much longer PhD programme.
    Britain may well have better funding opportunities that Sweden. I have no idea. It certainly doesn't have better funding opportunities than the US or Canada. PhD students in North America are paid by the university without regard to nationality and not being funded is essentially a polite rejection. THis is bad advice and simply untrue.
 
 
 
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