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    Hi everyone, I am currently in year 11 and I just have a few questions about going to university in the USA. I know it's early yet, but I just wanted to know a few things. I would post in paragraphs but it won't let me put a new line. Firstly, what is the difference between College and University over there? It confuses me and I just wanted to know more about it. Secondly, how would you be aided financially? Would they help you out with the costs? I heard some do but others don't with international students. Next, where would be a good idea to start? Bearing in mind I would like to study Graphic Design. I'd just like some tips from people who know about it and/or who have done the move. Thanks in advance!
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    Universities in America have a lot more scholarships than we do, because the fees are so much higher than ours. Some are open to international students - your best bet is to decide on some universities you like and contact them individually to ask if you could apply for any (not yet, you don't need to worry about details at the moment). If you encounter financial problems, a much cheaper way to do it is to study at a UK university which offers a year abroad in America. Unless there's a specific reason for wanting to study in the states?
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    (Original post by tory88)
    Universities in America have a lot more scholarships than we do, because the fees are so much higher than ours. Some are open to international students - your best bet is to decide on some universities you like and contact them individually to ask if you could apply for any (not yet, you don't need to worry about details at the moment). If you encounter financial problems, a much cheaper way to do it is to study at a UK university which offers a year abroad in America. Unless there's a specific reason for wanting to study in the states?
    Thanks for the quick reply. That's a good idea about the year abroad, I didn't think of that. The reason I want to study in the USA is just because I want a change of scenery to the UK. I'd like to experience the American way of life and I feel that going to study there may be the easiest way to go about it.
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    Does anyone know anything else about this? I'd prefer the California area because of the relaxed atmosphere and the warm climate. I really don't know much at all about this so any information is more than welcome.
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    In the US, a college is usually a collection of majors or courses of study, whereas a university is a collection of colleges. So, for example, my university had a College of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Architecture, and a few others. Within the College of Arts and Sciences, there was Biology, Art, Maths, etc., which would be a 'major'. Hope that made sense.

    If you want to look at schools in the US, I'd recommend starting off with this website. You can go to College Search to try and find programs that fit what you want. I did a quick search for Graphic Design major in the West, and quite a few came up. I don't know much about financial aid for international students, but once you narrow down your choices, you can go to the individual university's website and I'm sure there will be a section on financial aid.

    Hope that helped!
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    In the US, "university" and "college" mean the same thing. They're both higher education institutions that teach undergrads and/or carry out academic research.

    tory88 is right - there are a lot of scholarships available at US unis. Not as many for international students, but still quite a lot. It takes a lot of time and effort to find good ones to apply to - a good place to start might be through the links here. Bear in mind one key distinction - some unis award need-based aid, which is given purely on the basis of what you can afford to pay, and some give merit-based aid, which is given based on how good your application is, or how good you are at certain things (sport, music etc). Some unis even give both types of aid!

    As for graphic design, again, it takes time researching on the internet which unis have design schools that you like. Bear in mind that at the undergraduate level, you cannot apply to US unis to study one specific subject. You have to do a "liberal arts" degree, which means taking courses in lots of different subjects. You can focus more on one particular subject in the second two years of the degree (bear in mind that undergrad degrees in the US last a minimum of 4 years).

    Though it takes a lot of effort to apply to the US, it is worth it in the end - almost all Brits who study in the US absolutely love it! There's lots of general advice to help you at Uni in the USA.
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    (Original post by carma)
    In the US, a college is usually a collection of majors or courses of study, whereas a university is a collection of colleges. So, for example, my university had a College of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Architecture, and a few others. Within the College of Arts and Sciences, there was Biology, Art, Maths, etc., which would be a 'major'. Hope that made sense.

    If you want to look at schools in the US, I'd recommend starting off with this website. You can go to College Search to try and find programs that fit what you want. I did a quick search for Graphic Design major in the West, and quite a few came up. I don't know much about financial aid for international students, but once you narrow down your choices, you can go to the individual university's website and I'm sure there will be a section on financial aid.

    Hope that helped!
    Thanks so much for that, it really helped me out. I might start looking into University of California-Los Angeles or San Diego.
    (Original post by John Wallis)
    In the US, "university" and "college" mean the same thing. They're both higher education institutions that teach undergrads and/or carry out academic research.

    tory88 is right - there are a lot of scholarships available at US unis. Not as many for international students, but still quite a lot. It takes a lot of time and effort to find good ones to apply to - a good place to start might be through the links here. Bear in mind one key distinction - some unis award need-based aid, which is given purely on the basis of what you can afford to pay, and some give merit-based aid, which is given based on how good your application is, or how good you are at certain things (sport, music etc). Some unis even give both types of aid!

    As for graphic design, again, it takes time researching on the internet which unis have design schools that you like. Bear in mind that at the undergraduate level, you cannot apply to US unis to study one specific subject. You have to do a "liberal arts" degree, which means taking courses in lots of different subjects. You can focus more on one particular subject in the second two years of the degree (bear in mind that undergrad degrees in the US last a minimum of 4 years).

    Though it takes a lot of effort to apply to the US, it is worth it in the end - almost all Brits who study in the US absolutely love it! There's lots of general advice to help you at Uni in the USA.
    Thanks John, that also helped a lot too. I'll check out those links you provided and see what I can find. Thanks again to both of you .
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    (Original post by Haz Baz)
    Thanks so much for that, it really helped me out. I might start looking into University of California-Los Angeles or San Diego.

    Thanks John, that also helped a lot too. I'll check out those links you provided and see what I can find. Thanks again to both of you .
    Unfortunately, UCLA and UCSD are both state-funded public universities and will therefore have no aid for out-of-state/international students. I am afraid this holds true for all of the University of California system. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.
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    (Original post by Haz Baz)
    Hi everyone, I am currently in year 11 and I just have a few questions about going to university in the USA. I know it's early yet, but I just wanted to know a few things. I would post in paragraphs but it won't let me put a new line. Firstly, what is the difference between College and University over there? It confuses me and I just wanted to know more about it. Secondly, how would you be aided financially? Would they help you out with the costs? I heard some do but others don't with international students. Next, where would be a good idea to start? Bearing in mind I would like to study Graphic Design. I'd just like some tips from people who know about it and/or who have done the move. Thanks in advance!

    Okay so I live in the states! College is usually the term to describe the undergraduate part of university/a liberal arts college (which are much smaller and broader than actual "Universities"). Financially you can be given scholarships for essays and projects and if you qualify you may be able to receive aid from the school. It is much more difficult to get aid directly from the university if you are an international student though. Where to start. In Graphic Design, there are plenty of great schools. Another bonus is in the US you do not have to know your field of study, you choose that at the end of your second year. But Uni here is 4 years. IF you want to PM me I can help you with schools choices. DO you want a big school, small school, rural/suburban/big city?
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    I'd also like to study in America but I want to do law over there, any advice as well?

    OP go to this link, it's about studying the US, I've looked at it as well, there are tests like SAT's you need to take first http://www.fulbright.org.uk/


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    Chicago Illinois is the best university in the world.
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    For graphic design check out some of these Unis (bear in mind some of these are extremely competitive to get a place at):

    Rhode Island School of Design:
    World renown, may major artist have attended and graduated this School
    http://www.risd.edu/

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Lab
    A design school within arguably the best technical university in the world
    http://www.media.mit.edu/

    Carnegie Mellon University, School of design
    The same as MIT but not necessarily the same level of rigor.
    http://www.design.cmu.edu/

    Pratt Institute
    A top design school located in New York
    http://www.pratt.edu/

    Art Center College of Design
    Specialist Design school located in Pasadena, California
    http://www.artcenter.edu/accd/index.jsp

    School of Visiual Arts
    Design school in New York
    http://www.sva.edu/

    Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences
    A well regarded design school specialising in computer created design.
    http://cias.rit.edu/schools/design

    Cranbook Academy of art
    A unique school where Artists in residence take the place of professors in teaching.
    http://www.cranbrookart.edu/

    Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by RemiMarcelle)
    I'd also like to study in America but I want to do law over there, any advice as well?

    OP go to this link, it's about studying the US, I've looked at it as well, there are tests like SAT's you need to take first http://www.fulbright.org.uk/


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    You do know law school is a professional postgraduate school in the U.S., right?

    You would have to first complete an accredited bachelors program before applying. Just in case you didn't know. Be prepared to finance it with mainly loans as well, to the tune of say $200,000 for the whole degree.

    There are some scholarships but they are generally offered to the best of the best p and only at prestigious universities such as Georgetown and Vanderbilt. Harvard, Yale and Columbia only give out needs-based aid. So depending on your parents income and assets they will compile an estimated family contribution, subtract from the total cost of attendance and present the amount they deem appropriate for your financial situation. Be warned, this may still not cover your whole fees and as I said earlier, you will have to take out loans to finance the rest.

    For any more info, just holla back at me haha I mean send me a PM.
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    I'm just completing a year abroad in the U.S. if you have any further questions :cute:.
 
 
 
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