Sazzle4
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Hi,
I'm a mature student studying Primary Education with QTS and due to graduate in 2014.

If all goes well and I achieve QTS I've been wondering about the possiblity of me one day moving abroad (long or short term).

I've had a massive change in my personal circumstances (9 year relationship ended unexpectedly) and am really just assessing my options for the future now that things are so different for me.

I've been googling a lot but I'm not finding a lot of helpful information. Essentially what I'd like to know is whether my qualifications (assuming all goes well and I graduate with QTS) would be valid abroad? I realise that it would probably be best to get my NQT year done over here first, although I do also believe there are countries which would accept my QTS without completing my NQT year first.

My main country of interest is Matla but I'm having little success finding out whether this is at all realistic or whether it's something of a pipe dream and I should channel my energies into finding somewhere in the UK that I'd like to settle.

Can anyone help at all? Have you done something similar? Can you tell me if any countries accept UK QTS qualifications? I would be very grateful for any information at all as I'm struggling to find anything clear.
0
reply
rachelsays
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Hi Sazzle,

QTS qualifies you to teach in England and Wales only.

In order to qualify to teach in a country's state system outside of these two countries - including Scotland - you will be expected to have a postgraduate teaching qualification.

The exception to this is teaching in International schools or British schools abroad - they'd recognise QTS. Some private schools abroad may also be willing to waive the postgraduate requirement for an outstanding teacher.

I'd get your NQT year out of the way first and then seriously look into it. If you do have to go down the International/British school abroad route, the likelihood is that you will be in a very competitive market, so the more experience you have before you apply, the better.

Good luck!
0
reply
dakyras
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
Just like to say that QTS itself isn't recognised outside of England and Wales, but an academic qualification such as a PGCE or BEd/BA with QTS is usually recognised as equivalent to other countries' teaching qualifications, and is accepted to teach abroad (especially in English-speaking/Commonwealth countries).

Scotland accepts BEd/BA with QTS as a teaching qualification, so the above is incorrect, and many countries will be the same. It will obviously be harder to teach in a country whose language of instruction isn't English (for Malta you will need to speak Maltese fluently).

However, routes such as GTP/SCITT aren't recognised abroad, as you don't have an actual teaching qualification, you're just recognised as being able to teach in England and Wales.

edit: It's generally expected that you've completed the NQT year before you are recognised as a 'full teacher', and can then teach abroad.

n.b. the above is all for teaching curriculum subjects in schools. If you just want to teach ESL for a private company, then get a CELTA/CertTESOL, and bon voyage.
0
reply
rachelsays
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by dakyras)
Just like to say that QTS itself isn't recognised outside of England and Wales, but an academic qualification such as a PGCE or BEd/BA with QTS is usually recognised as equivalent to other countries' teaching qualifications, and is accepted to teach abroad (especially in English-speaking/Commonwealth countries).

Scotland accepts BEd/BA with QTS as a teaching qualification, so the above is incorrect, and many countries will be the same. It will obviously be harder to teach in a country whose language of instruction isn't English (for Malta you will need to speak Maltese fluently).

However, routes such as GTP/SCITT aren't recognised abroad, as you don't have an actual teaching qualification, you're just recognised as being able to teach in England and Wales.

edit: It's generally expected that you've completed the NQT year before you are recognised as a 'full teacher', and can then teach abroad.

n.b. the above is all for teaching curriculum subjects in schools. If you just want to teach ESL for a private company, then get a CELTA/CertTESOL, and bon voyage.
Thanks for correcting me; I apologise for my misinformation.

In many countries though a Postgraduate qualification is certainly preferred if not required- especially once you leave Europe. Some countries will also insist you take a conversion course or an extra year of study to qualify you to teach in their state system - Canada and the US in particular. Everywhere is different which is why it's important to do thorough research on the specific country you want to go to.
0
reply
DrSRH
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
(Original post by dakyras)
Just like to say that QTS itself isn't recognised outside of England and Wales, but an academic qualification such as a PGCE or BEd/BA with QTS is usually recognised as equivalent to other countries' teaching qualifications, and is accepted to teach abroad (especially in English-speaking/Commonwealth countries).

Scotland accepts BEd/BA with QTS as a teaching qualification, so the above is incorrect, and many countries will be the same. It will obviously be harder to teach in a country whose language of instruction isn't English (for Malta you will need to speak Maltese fluently).

However, routes such as GTP/SCITT aren't recognised abroad, as you don't have an actual teaching qualification, you're just recognised as being able to teach in England and Wales.

edit: It's generally expected that you've completed the NQT year before you are recognised as a 'full teacher', and can then teach abroad.

n.b. the above is all for teaching curriculum subjects in schools. If you just want to teach ESL for a private company, then get a CELTA/CertTESOL, and bon voyage.

Where are you getting this information from, do you have a source? I have heard that quite a few European and non-EU countries do accept QTS or are in the process of accepting this.

I think most people say you need a PGCE because the common 'live abroad' countries like Australia and Canada do not currently accept QTS. However, the impression I get is that many other countries do.

Some clear information sources on this would be great otherwise we can't make an informed opinion.
0
reply
Sazzle4
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#6
Thanks for all of the information! It does appear that other people are as confused as I am about what the requirements for different places actually are. I'm still in the process of researching all of this and do have time on my side as I still have another year of my BA left and the sensible option regardless of requirements would be to do my NQT first I think. Thanks for all of the help!
0
reply
dakyras
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by DrSRH)
Where are you getting this information from, do you have a source? I have heard that quite a few European and non-EU countries do accept QTS or are in the process of accepting this.

I think most people say you need a PGCE because the common 'live abroad' countries like Australia and Canada do not currently accept QTS. However, the impression I get is that many other countries do.

Some clear information sources on this would be great otherwise we can't make an informed opinion.
'QTS' isn't accepted anywhere outside of England and Wales. It doesn't mean anything outside of those two countries.

What countries look for is evidence of an academic training programme.
0
reply
Shelly_x
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by Sazzle4)
Thanks for all of the information! It does appear that other people are as confused as I am about what the requirements for different places actually are. I'm still in the process of researching all of this and do have time on my side as I still have another year of my BA left and the sensible option regardless of requirements would be to do my NQT first I think. Thanks for all of the help!
I was told by everyone I have spoken to on this matter that you should definitely do the NQT first, as you need to do this to be fully qualified.
1
reply
DrSRH
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by dakyras)
'QTS' isn't accepted anywhere outside of England and Wales. It doesn't mean anything outside of those two countries.

What countries look for is evidence of an academic training programme.
OK thanks but where are you getting this information? Does this apply to all countries, just EU or non-EU too?

It may not 'mean anything' but are other countries willing to accept a qualified teacher with experience regardless of the level of postgraduate qualification?

Please, let's have informed responses.
0
reply
dakyras
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by DrSRH)
OK thanks but where are you getting this information? Does this apply to all countries, just EU or non-EU too?

It may not 'mean anything' but are other countries willing to accept a qualified teacher with experience regardless of the level of postgraduate qualification?

Please, let's have informed responses.
It really depends on the country. Let's take British Columbia, for example:

http://www.bcteacherregulation.ca/Te...ryname=England

They specifically don't accept 3 year BAs, SCITT or Teach First.

Scotland, on the other hand, accept BA/BEd degrees. And NYC, for example (countries like the US, Canada, and Australia have different teaching rules per state/province), will accept a BA/BEd provided it has a certain amount of credits specialising in a subject/age-group.

A general rule of thumb is that SCITT programmes are not accepted anywhere, BA/BEds are accepted in some countries, and bachelor degrees + PGCEs are accepted in almost any English-speaking country.
0
reply
DrSRH
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by dakyras)
It really depends on the country. Let's take British Columbia, for example:

http://www.bcteacherregulation.ca/Te...ryname=England

They specifically don't accept 3 year BAs, SCITT or Teach First.

Scotland, on the other hand, accept BA/BEd degrees. And NYC, for example (countries like the US, Canada, and Australia have different teaching rules per state/province), will accept a BA/BEd provided it has a certain amount of credits specialising in a subject/age-group.

A general rule of thumb is that SCITT programmes are not accepted anywhere, BA/BEds are accepted in some countries, and bachelor degrees + PGCEs are accepted in almost any English-speaking country.
OK that's helpful thanks but we can see how complex this is with regulations/requirements varying not just by country but also by state/province. I guess we just need to check on a case by case basis but British Columbia make things pretty clear at least!
0
reply
Cab14
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report 6 years ago
#12
Hi did you get a job in Malta? I am looking into teaching there, I have 10 years experience but did a GTP.
0
reply
Angelil
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#13
Report 6 years ago
#13
International schools would without doubt value the fact that you have qualified as a teacher under the British system and thus have recent experience of the UK curriculum.

You don't specifically *need* to have completed your NQT year to be hired by a school abroad, but I would nonetheless recommend doing so. International schools in particular are highly likely to just throw you in at the deep end with no support, which could come as a big shock to the inexperienced. I was really lucky in that when I started teaching overseas (as an unqualified teacher) I was able to start part-time and gradually build up my hours as I became more experienced, but this is not the case for most people.

Both of the comments above, however, relate to international private schools. I don't think that the rate at which state schools abroad accept UK qualifications is at all systematic. Technically they should all accept British qualifications as being directly transferable, due to EU law. However, many schools do not (anecdotal evidence as an example: my aunt taught for 10 years in the UK and was also a headmistress, but was unequivocally refused work in French state schools, despite also being fluent in French).

So you can try, but don't be surprised if you find it difficult to gain a placement overseas within the state sector. The TES online is an excellent resource for both jobhunting and community support (the Teaching Overseas forum there is invaluable).
0
reply
tashag93
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#14
Report 5 years ago
#14
What is the situation if you were to do a SCITT course that awards a PGCE at the end of it? I am assuming the PGCE will be recognised, despite the fact that many people in the thread here have said that SCITT schemes are not accepted.
0
reply
El Salvador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 5 years ago
#15
QTS technically recognised by all governments in the EU, but I heard in practice you don't really have a chance in the state sector with only a degree, especially if you don't speak their language.

In the private sector, it really depends on the actual company or school. They don't necessarily ask for any teaching qualification, and with tutorial schools and stuff very often a degree (and being white) is more than enough.
0
reply
El Salvador
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#16
Report 5 years ago
#16
(Original post by dakyras)
It really depends on the country. Let's take British Columbia, for example:

http://www.bcteacherregulation.ca/Te...ryname=England

They specifically don't accept 3 year BAs, SCITT or Teach First.

Scotland, on the other hand, accept BA/BEd degrees. And NYC, for example (countries like the US, Canada, and Australia have different teaching rules per state/province), will accept a BA/BEd provided it has a certain amount of credits specialising in a subject/age-group.

A general rule of thumb is that SCITT programmes are not accepted anywhere, BA/BEds are accepted in some countries, and bachelor degrees + PGCEs are accepted in almost any English-speaking country.
Different countries may have the same set of qualifications (BA/BEd, PGCE/PGDE), but it doesn't mean that they recognise it officially as a proper teaching qualification.

For all intents and purposes, you can call yourself a qualified teacher if you're qualified anywhere, but it's up to individual governments and corporations to recognise it, and very often governments have their own local teaching qualifications. For example, a PGDE from University of Birmingham is recognised as a proper teaching qualification in the UK, but not in HK; a PGDE from University of Hong Kong is recognised as a proper teaching qualification in HK, but not in the UK.

Different countries have different conversion rules, but I don't think any, apart from technically within the EU plus several European countries, will recognise them automatically.
0
reply
Maxieboy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#17
Report 5 years ago
#17
I have a Childhood Studies Degree (BA Hons) and have nearly finished my PCGE. I was working as an unqualified teacher for 2 1/2 years and HLTA for 2 Years, The school were going to support me to complete my PCGE but for different reasons this did not happen. I have therefore left the school to complete the PCGE (I know sounds confusing!!!).

We wish to live and work in Australia and I know they accept the PCGE with QTS but do you have to do your NQT year in England or can you complete in Australia and would my experience of whole class teaching count? Thanks.
0
reply
Maxieboy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#18
Report 5 years ago
#18
I have a Childhood Studies Degree (BA Hons) and have nearly finished my PCGE. I was working as an unqualified teacher for 2 1/2 years and HLTA for 2 Years, The school were going to support me to complete my PCGE but for different reasons this did not happen. I have therefore left the school to complete the PCGE (I know sounds confusing!!!).

We wish to live and work in Australia and I know they accept the PCGE with QTS but do you have to do your NQT year in England or can you complete in Australia and would my experience of whole class teaching count? Thanks.
0
reply
TiffoRose
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#19
Report 4 years ago
#19
Hi can anyone help me! I am currently a teacher in the UK and I have been teaching for 6 years. I have a bachelor or arts honours with QTS (I studied for 4 years) . I am wanting to teach in New Zealand. What are my chances? Is it recognised there???
0
reply
Carr12
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#20
Report 3 years ago
#20
Hi, hope someone can help!

I'm finishing my PGCE in June 2017....my husband and I were planning to move to Oz after I'd completed my NQT year.

However my husband has just been offered a job in Melbourne within the company he's worked for for many years- so we'd be sponsored and it'd literally be the chance of a lifetime. But we'd have to go with next few months!

I've been researching but wanted to check whether I'm right in thinking that your QTS doesn't ever run out? So if it all went wrong we could come home and I'd still be able to pick up where I left off and complete my NQT year here at a later date?

Also....am I right in thinking my QTS isn't recognised in Australia? So I'd have to complete it in a British school (I'm guessing these are hard jobs to get) or complete their version of the qualification? Would I be able to do that if I've only just moved into the country?! How long would that take me? I've just spent 4 years working and studying with 3 children to look after....I really don't want to study anymore!! But I don't want to throw the last 4 years away either!

Thanks in advance

C xx
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (665)
33.54%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (845)
42.61%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (384)
19.36%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (89)
4.49%

Watched Threads

View All