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    This is a serious topic here. I have literally days to choose and yet after 3-4 months of thinking I can't get my head straight into it. I always wanted medicine in the past, but then I realised I wasn't good enough, so started thinking about my passion to computers, maybe Computer Science... well no, didn't see myself in that career, then maybe Accounting? Heck no, boring!

    Let's say this straight, in all of the subjects I will list below, I have achieved A* in the modules, so the thing of 'take the one that you are better at' does not work here.

    Should I take

    Biology, Chemistry, Maths

    or

    Maths, Physics, ICT
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    (Original post by borysek01)
    This is a serious topic here. I have literally days to choose and yet after 3-4 months of thinking I can't get my head straight into it. I always wanted medicine in the past, but then I realised I wasn't good enough, so started thinking about my passion to computers, maybe Computer Science... well no, didn't see myself in that career, then maybe Accounting? Heck no, boring!

    Let's say this straight, in all of the subjects I will list below, I have achieved A* in the modules, so the thing of 'take the one that you are better at' does not work here.

    Should I take

    Biology, Chemistry, Maths

    or

    Maths, Physics, ICT
    The best advice anyone can give you is to just follow your interests. You tend to work harder at subjects you like, you tend to do better, you tend to be generally happier in general. And the more work you do in a sector, the more you will learn about what you could go on to do.

    Don't be too concerned about the future jobs; just go with what you enjoy now. If you are taking science subjects then there will definitely be jobs available down the line (because workers in that industry are in demand).
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    The best advice anyone can give you is to just follow your interests. You tend to work harder at subjects you like, you tend to do better, you tend to be generally happier in general. And the more work you do in a sector, the more you will learn about what you could go on to do.

    Don't be too concerned about the future jobs; just go with what you enjoy now. If you are taking science subjects then there will definitely be jobs available down the line (because workers in that industry are in demand).
    I need to be specific on what subjects I want at this point. I love biology, actually I love every single subject I named above, except one - chemistry. I always fear that I'll drop because of chemistry at a-level. But on the other hand, I can't see a point in keeping on biology without chemistry aside to that.
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    (Original post by borysek01)
    I need to be specific on what subjects I want at this point. I love biology, actually I love every single subject I named above, except one - chemistry. I always fear that I'll drop because of chemistry at a-level. But on the other hand, I can't see a point in keeping on biology without chemistry aside to that.
    Well if the only chemistry you've done so far is GCSE Chemistry then I wouldn't be too concerned. A Level Chemistry is much closer to physics/ maths and so can be a bit more interesting.
    You can do a Biology degree without Chemistry A level, but you are right that Biology and Chemistry make a good subject combination.

    One thing to consider may be to ask some of your teachers on their view/ opinion on the matter, as they are likely to have a good idea about your interests and abilities, and perhaps more accurately predict what you will like or do well in in the future.
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    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    Well if the only chemistry you've done so far is GCSE Chemistry then I wouldn't be too concerned. A Level Chemistry is much closer to physics/ maths and so can be a bit more interesting.
    You can do a Biology degree without Chemistry A level, but you are right that Biology and Chemistry make a good subject combination.

    One thing to consider may be to ask some of your teachers on their view/ opinion on the matter, as they are likely to have a good idea about your interests and abilities, and perhaps more accurately predict what you will like or do well in in the future.
    Chemistry was difficult for me, I revised for my module and such - and found it difficult, even though I came out with the highest mark out of all three sciences (A*, yes.) I still don't think I was confident enough. This year, even balancing equations seems difficult, I just can't seem to find interest in those equations, I like the theory more.

    Regarding teachers, I did talk to them. My Biology teacher says it's really difficult and barely no one gets A's past couple of years, even the top students. Although after all that, she said I'm fit for it. Same goes for Chemistry, but she says that if I want Maths - then Physics would be a better option. And my Physics teacher doesn't say nothing, she just expects me to be in her class at AS & A2.
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    I'll bump this.
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    If you're more of a maths person do maths and physics. If you prefer writing do biology. Physics is spending lots of times using equations, biology is pretty much all theory (lots of memorising words and writing long answers) and Chemistry is a mixture of the both of them.
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    Well, what puts me off is Chemistry. I find it really hard and can't understand it (my A* isn't a great indication of that, but oh well). Is there any point of keeping biology on without chemistry? What degree would that take me into?
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    (Original post by borysek01)
    Chemistry was difficult for me, I revised for my module and such - and found it difficult, even though I came out with the highest mark out of all three sciences (A*, yes.) I still don't think I was confident enough. This year, even balancing equations seems difficult, I just can't seem to find interest in those equations, I like the theory more.

    Regarding teachers, I did talk to them. My Biology teacher says it's really difficult and barely no one gets A's past couple of years, even the top students. Although after all that, she said I'm fit for it. Same goes for Chemistry, but she says that if I want Maths - then Physics would be a better option. And my Physics teacher doesn't say nothing, she just expects me to be in her class at AS & A2.
    Well like I said Chemistry at A level is quite different to GCSE. A level chemistry looks more into calculations, looking more at structure, bonding and how reactions take place. It will also look at some electron based phenomena such as why things are coloured, and also how to use colour to identify the element/ compound. There is also a lot more on organic chemistry (which has quite a lot in common with A level Biology).

    There would also be nothing wrong with picking Biology, Maths and Physics - even if it does seem to be a bit of an odd combination. That wouldn't stop you applying for Biology and it wouldn't stop you from applying for Maths/ Physics/ Computer Science. It would stop you from applying for Medicine, Pharmacy or any BioChem courses though (because they would require Chemistry).

    Speaking through experience and what I have observed, people who do subjects they like and enjoy almost always do better than those who don't. So, again, that is what I advise here.
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    The Biology, Maths and Physics combination seems quite unusual indeed, especially because the Biology has no input what so ever. The last line you posted,
    (Original post by Llewellyn)
    Speaking through experience and what I have observed, people who do subjects they like and enjoy almost always do better than those who don't. So, again, that is what I advise here.
    got me thinking though.
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    Can't you take four? Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths. Then you'll keep your options open and you can drop one it it becomes too much work or you decide you don't want to pursue it


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    The thing is, I don't really want to keep the options open, I just can't think I'll cope with Chemistry and Biology (chemistry is the issue here) , yet another science will be just over the top.
 
 
 
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