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    Why is a star with a larger mass more hotter (in its core)?
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    Gravitational attraction is strongest where the mass is greatest. That increased pull drags in more matter and gravity gets stronger still, which pulls in even more matter. The mass collects at the core in this way and pressure (therefore temperature) in the core increases accordingly. Hence the more mass at the core, the greater the temperature.
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    More mass = stronger gravity = more pressure at core = more nuclear fusion = more energy release.
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    (Original post by stuart_aitken)
    More mass = stronger gravity = more pressure at core = more nuclear fusion = more energy release.

    Great! Thanks a lot
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    (Original post by uberteknik)
    Gravitational attraction is strongest where the mass is greatest. That increased pull drags in more matter and gravity gets stronger still, which pulls in even more matter. The mass collects at the core in this way and pressure (therefore temperature) in the core increases accordingly. Hence the more mass at the core, the greater the temperature.
    I got this GCSE question:
    "Suppose there are two gas clouds in space, and both have the same pressure but cloud A is much hotter than cloud B. What can you say about the density of the two clouds."

    Now the answer I thought is that the density of cloud A (the hotter one) will be lower than B. The reason being is that as the temperature is higher, the particles will have more kinetic energy, thus spreading out over a larger area -the particles cover a larger area, the density (amount of particles in a specific area) must therefore decrease.

    Is this correct?
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    (Original post by Nick Latham)
    The huge mass of the star results in an increased pressure at the core. This means that nuclear fusion occurs more often, and heat is released during fusion.

    I got this GCSE question:
    "Suppose there are two gas clouds in space, and both have the same pressure but cloud A is much hotter than cloud B. What can you say about the density of the two clouds."

    Now the answer I thought is that the density of cloud A (the hotter one) will be lower than B. The reason being is that as the temperature is higher, the particles will have more kinetic energy, thus spreading out over a larger area -the particles cover a larger area, the density (amount of particles in a specific area) must therefore decrease.

    Is this correct?
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    (Original post by stuart_aitken)
    More mass = stronger gravity = more pressure at core = more nuclear fusion = more energy release.
    I got this GCSE question:
    "Suppose there are two gas clouds in space, and both have the same pressure but cloud A is much hotter than cloud B. What can you say about the density of the two clouds."

    Now the answer I thought is that the density of cloud A (the hotter one) will be lower than B. The reason being is that as the temperature is higher, the particles will have more kinetic energy, thus spreading out over a larger area -the particles cover a larger area, the density (amount of particles in a specific area) must therefore decrease.

    Is this correct?
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    (Original post by park1996)
    I got this GCSE question:
    "Suppose there are two gas clouds in space, and both have the same pressure but cloud A is much hotter than cloud B. What can you say about the density of the two clouds."

    Now the answer I thought is that the density of cloud A (the hotter one) will be lower than B. The reason being is that as the temperature is higher, the particles will have more kinetic energy, thus spreading out over a larger area -the particles cover a larger area, the density (amount of particles in a specific area) must therefore decrease.

    Is this correct?
    Yeah that sounds right!

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