Best Way To Revise The Organic Synthesis Pathway Watch

croakly
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Hi, I'm studying AQA A2 Chemistry and wondering how do you guys remember all the reagents and steps to change it from one thing to another. My teachers didnt really teach these stuff well in both AS and A2. When I look in the text book, there is a fat kind of spider diagram with loads of steps... its very hard to learn from it...

I got like less than one month to learn this and other exams to revise... thanks
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WorkHouse
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(Original post by croakly)
Hi, I'm studying AQA A2 Chemistry and wondering how do you guys remember all the reagents and steps to change it from one thing to another. My teachers didnt really teach these stuff well in both AS and A2. When I look in the text book, there is a fat kind of spider diagram with loads of steps... its very hard to learn from it...

I got like less than one month to learn this and other exams to revise... thanks
Hey, although i don't do AQA (i do WJEC - the slightly harder due to the randomness version of AQA) know a hell of a lot bout your course as our teacher has taught it for last 10 yearsa before she came to our school... old habits and all that...

Which text book you got?

I recommend chem in context if u haven't got it already... the "fat kind of spider diagram" was the best way for me to revise, kinda made my own, one Aliphatic and one Aromatic... with **** loads of colour and stuck them up on my wall... was a REAL help... hope that helps?
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croakly
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Well the teacher gave us Collins AQA A2 book with a dude riding on some sort of boat thing lol... this book is useless because there are loads of information that you dont need to know...
but i use 2 types of revision book. one is the collins A2 module 4+5 small red books ( quite good as it specific to the syllabus) and the other is Heinemann Revise A2 chemistry by paddy gannon for aqa. When I revise I refer to both of these books to see if I miss anything.

I guess i have to learn this by the diagrams then...

yeah i guess WJEC would be harder... its not that popular so not many books specific to that board... AQA is good as all their past papers even practicals are in the website from year 2001 to 2005.
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WorkHouse
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(Original post by croakly)
Well the teacher gave us Collins AQA A2 book with a dude riding on some sort of boat thing lol... this book is useless because there are loads of information that you dont need to know...
but i use 2 types of revision book. one is the collins A2 module 4+5 small red books ( quite good as it specific to the syllabus) and the other is Heinemann Revise A2 chemistry by paddy gannon. When I revise I refer to both of these books to see if I miss anything.
Thats a really good way to do it - WJEC have something simmilar to the red books but they're crap.... they don't make sense half the time as i'm sure they're written in welsh then translated back tot Eng, so sentance structure is all messed up!

I would seriously recommed chem in context though...

U can find it on amazon or something i'm sure... it'll be pure cheap as well used. ISBN is 0174482760 ...
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croakly
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lol thanks for the recommendation... should of really brought it like at the start of the year so that i would get used to it... its costs £29 brand new... i guess its like a school text book so there is quite alot to read up on.

okay thanks for the advice...
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gyrase
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(Original post by croakly)
Hi, I'm studying AQA A2 Chemistry and wondering how do you guys remember all the reagents and steps to change it from one thing to another. My teachers didnt really teach these stuff well in both AS and A2. When I look in the text book, there is a fat kind of spider diagram with loads of steps... its very hard to learn from it...

I got like less than one month to learn this and other exams to revise... thanks
"From one thing to another..."

Sounds almost poetic, but remember that it's not a magical act. Rather a chemical process.

Anyway, pick your favourite molecule (mine is propane) and find out how would you make propanol out of it. What conditions are required in changing it like this. Then try to figure out how you could get propanone from propanol etc.

If you do it this way, your applying your knowledge and application will always enhance your memory. Also in doing this, all the other various topics of chemistry can be integrated into your revision; e.g. isomers formed in propane etc.

Then keep practising each day until the exams.
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croakly
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Report Thread starter 12 years ago
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Thanks thats a good idea, will definitely try that.
The hard thing is to remember all those conditions and reagents to use. Like tin/HCl for making phenylamines I think... and there is backwards conditions and reagents omg thats pure memory lol... I guess if you know the reaction eg reduction you could remember that LiAlH4 is good at reducing.
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