Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Would a suit be necessary? I was thinking smart jeans with a shirt and sweater. That's what I've worn before to a Royal Mail job and a security job and it didn't seem to be a problem.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Jeans... At least wear smart trousers or formal trousers. In the way you dress, you present yourself to the employer. Suit is not necessary as long as you don't turn up with jeans or chinos. It depends on company's dress code.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Jeans... At least wear smart trousers or formal trousers. In the way you dress, you present yourself to the employer. Suit is not necessary as long as you don't turn up with jeans or chinos. It depends on company's dress code.
    So should I wear a shirt with no tie with it?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    The jobs people do... unbelievable.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I would dress smartly - in chinos, and a jacket. If you turn up looking like a scruff, they may think that you will go to houses looking the same way. (you probably will look scruffy going to houses - some of those meters are in silly places)

    Dress well but not over the top - and good for you doing that job. Interacting with the general public is often difficult and will be good for your CV.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    The jobs people do... unbelievable.
    Haha, I'm not really expecting a horrible job, it's just electricity meter reading. I've had people come to my house before, it's just a quick 10 second job - and someone had to do it!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by squeakysquirrel)
    I would dress smartly - in chinos, and a jacket. If you turn up looking like a scruff, they may think that you will go to houses looking the same way. (you probably will look scruffy going to houses - some of those meters are in silly places)

    Dress well but not over the top - and good for you doing that job. Interacting with the general public is often difficult and will be good for your CV.
    I don't have any chinos so I guess I'll just swap that for suit trousers. Thanks!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S'Class)
    Haha, I'm not really expecting a horrible job, it's just electricity meter reading. I've had people come to my house before, it's just a quick 10 second job - and someone had to do it!
    How about getting a job that is actually somewhat intellectually challenging? Something that would actually look good on your CV and couldn't be done by some untrained hobo?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    How about getting a job that is actually somewhat intellectually challenging? Something that would actually look good on your CV and couldn't be done by some untrained hobo?
    How about I finish my studies first and get experience in something so such jobs would be open to me?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S'Class)
    How about I finish my studies first and get experience in something so such jobs would be open to me?
    It's too late then. Doing stupid work will not get you relevant experience for anything. And once you graduate, you should move up another step anyway and do highly conceptual and creative work. If you've only read meters before, the jump will be too large.

    Try to get an admin job with plenty of development opportunities and where you can bring in your own ideas - reading meters hardly provides that. A good starting point for that would be your university or its students' union. If you're good with IT offer to build spreadsheets/presentations for your uni's accounting/marketing department. There's ALWAYS a better option than physical, repetitive work.

    People have such low standards for themselves, no wonder they're unemployed after uni then.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    How about getting a job that is actually somewhat intellectually challenging? Something that would actually look good on your CV and couldn't be done by some untrained hobo?
    You mean like your Master's?

    Who the **** councelled you to do an MA instead of an MBA.... and you want to be go back into consulting, laughable.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    It's too late then. Doing stupid work will not get you relevant experience for anything. And once you graduate, you should move up another step anyway and do highly conceptual and creative work. If you've only read meters before, the jump will be too large.

    Try to get an admin job with plenty of development opportunities and where you can bring in your own ideas - reading meters hardly provides that. A good starting point for that would be your university or its students' union. If you're good with IT offer to build spreadsheets/presentations for your uni's accounting/marketing department. There's ALWAYS a better option than physical, repetitive work.

    People have such low standards for themselves, no wonder they're unemployed after uni then.
    Believe me I've tried. Why would I do this if I could get a job with better prospects? They all want experience which I don't have.

    When you don't have a job people tell you to get off your backside and find something, anything, to get off the dole. Thankfully, I haven't been in that position, but I'm doing my best to not get into it.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S'Class)
    So should I wear a shirt with no tie with it?
    Yes, you can I wore formal trousers, formal shoes, formal shirt and simple vest with no tie at all for my hospital interview

    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    It's too late then. Doing stupid work will not get you relevant experience for anything. And once you graduate, you should move up another step anyway and do highly conceptual and creative work. If you've only read meters before, the jump will be too large.

    Try to get an admin job with plenty of development opportunities and where you can bring in your own ideas - reading meters hardly provides that. A good starting point for that would be your university or its students' union. If you're good with IT offer to build spreadsheets/presentations for your uni's accounting/marketing department. There's ALWAYS a better option than physical, repetitive work.

    People have such low standards for themselves, no wonder they're unemployed after uni then.
    Even for admin jobs you need a lot of experience. Actually, people are more unemployed when they have high standards after University and say that they will never work in a supermarket etc.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S'Class)
    Believe me I've tried. Why would I do this if I could get a job with better prospects? They all want experience which I don't have.

    When you don't have a job people tell you to get off your backside and find something, anything, to get off the dole. Thankfully, I haven't been in that position, but I'm doing my best to not get into it.
    Ignore him dude, he's a tool.

    Clothes you mentioned in your OP seem absolutely fine for the type of interview, don't worry about the tie but do wear a shirt.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NW86)
    Ignore him dude, he's a tool.

    Clothes you mentioned in your OP seem absolutely fine for the type of interview, don't worry about the tie but do wear a shirt.
    Thanks for the advice
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Yes, you can I wore formal trousers, formal shoes, formal shirt and simple vest with no tie at all for my hospital interview
    Thank you

    I'll just forget you now...
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by S'Class)
    Thank you

    I'll just forget you now...
    Aww :teehee: :sad:

    (Original post by NW86)
    Ignore him dude, he's a tool.

    Clothes you mentioned in your OP seem absolutely fine for the type of interview, don't worry about the tie but do wear a shirt.
    Of course he will wear a shirt, no one goes with a bare chest :teehee:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NW86)
    You mean like your Master's?

    Who the **** councelled you to do an MA instead of an MBA.... and you want to be go back into consulting, laughable.
    You mean counselled? Nobody.

    As a business graduate (who has subsequently worked in that field) there's no point in doing an MBA, which is another generalist business degree. An MA, which is more specialised - and as a pleasant side effect, much cheaper - and easier to tailor to a students' profile makes much more sense.

    And I don't only 'want to be go back' into consulting, I AM back in Consulting. What's so difficult about '12-?? to understand?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TitanicTeutonicPhil)
    You mean counselled? Nobody.

    As a business graduate (who has subsequently worked in that field) there's no point in doing an MBA, which is another generalist business degree. An MA, which is more specialised - and as a pleasant side effect, much cheaper - and easier to tailor to a students' profile makes much more sense.

    And I don't only 'want to be go back' into consulting, I AM back in Consulting. What's so difficult about '12-?? to understand?
    Just because you have a job dont think you should be judging others who may be finding it more difficult
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Even for admin jobs you need a lot of experience.
    Not really. A bright mind, quick apprehension, strong marks, and good IT and communication skills were enough for me and my circle of friends to get in.

    (Original post by ForgetMe)
    Actually, people are more unemployed when they have high standards after University and say that they will never work in a supermarket etc.
    That's true - but what people don't get a job in their chosen field after graduation? I have trouble respecting those as they must have done pretty poorly on their degree or clearly lack other essential skills.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources

    Articles and guides:

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    CGI logo

    CGI is open for applications

    "Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Army logo

    The Army is recruiting now

    "With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

    Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

    Handle your digital footprint

    What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

    Quick links:

    Unanswered career sector and employment threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.