Change From Yr11 To Sixth Form Watch

JayAyy
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#521
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#521
(Original post by explosions hurt)
Don't bother doing work in your frees. You say you will but you know you won't.
If you do economics your teacher will probably be **** but that is no excuse.
Keep good notes.
I know it is obvious but focus on the things you find difficult. If you are good at maths then there is no point doing lots of work for it when you should be revising for chemistry.
My economics teacher was very good. Really passionate about the subject. But I do agree with you as I've heard many people complain about their economics teachers.
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Adam92
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#522
My economics teachers were both terrible
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bfbf
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#523
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(Original post by superpig22)
ok so i've just finished my a levels - would have appreciated some form of tips when i first began...
so here's some tips from me

- stay organised - i didn't and it simply added to the stress - get folders or notebooks for each subject, dividers, coloured pens, rulers,

- use your free's for work - means you can relax at home more

- normally what teachers tell you is correct - when they say something will help you it normally will

- ask for help when you need it - no harm in asking they do want you to succeed - don't just struggle on!

- do complete reading notes - i have hardly any class notes and did limitted back ground reading - found it hard to revise cos i had nothing to do it from!
Hmm I would disagree with most of them I stayed organized for the first term of AS then gave up my bag was just a mess of papers.

Teachers are often wrong, not normally on theory but about cw and exams. "O that is easily an A" "All you need to do is this" find out you did exactly what they said and got an D in the cw.

About 1% of my frees where used for work and that was normally when I had Homework due in next lesson.

Never did any notes :P

And got ABB which was good for me. My tips would be

- Listen in class, all these people that spend hours in the library or hours writing notes but don't listen tend to fail. In Maths and Physics this approach may work better but for common sense subjects and most essays etc. it does not. If you don't listen and copy what is down on the board I put money on the fact you have no idea what the lesson is about 3 hours later.

- No point doing hours of revision just for doing revision. Go through papers and try and learn that bits you don't understand. I found doing this with a friend worked well. We had 1-2 sessions per exam of around 4 hours each with a break. All a couple of days before of course. We just go a notes for the exam of the Internet - about 30 pages per exam and then did some questions.

- You can be a genius at a subject but still fail an exam. You need to know how many marks you get for application, analysis and evaluation and then write to that. I got 100% on 3 retakes just from knowing exam technique a lot better - my knowledge had got worse if anything.

- Read the question

- Do the right number of questions

- Don't stress

But I guess it depends what type of learner you are, if you learn from notes then that could be best for you but I learn from listening and hence I do this then print notes someone else has written.
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BlocFFC
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#524
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#524
One rule:Work very hard.

It is initially a massive step up frn GCSE and you need to work in the first year to make Uni applications easier and to get the groundwork done for your A2's.
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Navi_Fairy
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This advice helped me a lot, I'm starting in September, and really need to be able to sort out my work as I'm doing it. I think it's a great idea to do your revision notes as you go along - I wish I did that in my GCSE's, even though they're easier, I spent a long time writing up notes for revision, and don't want to do it moreso when my A-Level exams are looming.
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panglossian
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Working hard in September, October and November will really help. Most of my year didn't start working until December, due to the novelty of free periods and less subjects. It causes a lot of stress once you realise how close January exams are. Make sure you make good notes and don't leave it later, because it often gets forgotten about. Good planning and organisation, as everyone else has said, is so helpful.
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Sports Racer
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The most important rule to follow: Do your ******* work. Don't get complacent, don't get lazy, don't be stupid.

Organise yourself in the simplest and most effective way possible. Don't go overboard on stationery, don't spend more time planning revision than doing it.
In terms of equipment, you need the following:
black pen x2
mechanical pencil with rubber end x2
ruler (maybe)
spiral writing pad
lever arch folder

Write all notes and homeworks in spiral pad and tear them out and archive in lever arch (at home). (This is the way I did it. Use your own system if it works for you but DON'T WASTE TIME. You can shove all your work in your text books as long as you know what you're doing and handing good work in on time. Most people spend lessons 'organising' themselves by rearranging all their files or putting pieces of paper in wallets. Don't be them.)

Every half term consolidate existing knowledge. Make sure you're on top of everything. Make revision notes for the topics covered so far. This will really help you out come exam time.

Discipline. Don't tell yourself you'll do work in your frees when you won't. Make rules for yourself and stick to them. If you find yourself doing shoddy essays on Sunday evening then do something about it.

Time to take education in your own hands. Download the specifications and make sure you know everything that is on it. If your teacher goes outside the syllabus DISCARD this information (by go outside I mean teaches you NEW topics, NOT general good-to-include stuff about things that are already on the syllabus). If some bits are missed out SELF-TEACH them because YOUR GRADES are YOUR PROBLEM.
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bfbf
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(Original post by Sports Racer)
ime to take education in your own hands. Download the specifications and make sure you know everything that is on it. If your teacher goes outside the syllabus DISCARD this information. If some bits are missed out SELF-TEACH them because YOUR GRADES are YOUR PROBLEM.
Why would you DISCARD information, for example in Business studies or Economics you can go off the symbols but the information will still get you marks because you are applying it to the case study and evaluating on it. The more information you know the better but you HAVE to know the syllabus otherwise some questions could screw you over.
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Degausser
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#529
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#529
Here's one that tends to work well;

Work hard, Play harder. It's not a course that takes up all your free time, nor is it one that require you to revise from day one, so dont forget to enjoy yourself.
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super_dry
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#530
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less play and more work for AS

less work and more play for A2 :ninja:
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Sports Racer
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(Original post by bfbf)
Why would you DISCARD information, for example in Business studies or Economics you can go off the symbols but the information will still get you marks because you are applying it to the case study and evaluating on it. The more information you know the better but you HAVE to know the syllabus otherwise some questions could screw you over.
When I say go outside the syllabus I mean teaching a new topic that isn't required of you in order to 'impress the examiner'. This will only confuse you.
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username271381
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#532
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Definitely stay organised. I had a massive problem with organisation this year, as I scrapped the idea of having separate subject folders about two weeks into AS. That meant I just carried around the last couple of weeks' worth of handouts and notes in my bag and took them out and put them on my floor when we seemed to have moved onto a new topic. I always panicked a bit when teachers asked to see my notes. It really didn't help when it came to revision and I needed specific sheets, which were buried under 6 tonnes of paper...
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Skadoosh
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#533
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#533
Get decent ASs.
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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
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#534
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#534
My tip?

Don't listen to any of these tips and find out what how you work
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sylarfangirl
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#535
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For your frees, I would actually recommend not working, unless you have work to do for the same afternoon or whatever.

If you don't work and hang out with your friends, it means you're less likely to be out every night because you never see them. So you have more time at home to get the real work done.

That's the way I've done my AS year anyway.
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Pyropink
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#536
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Try getting the best grades first time round, lots of ppl dont bother and think they'll just resit, DO NOT DO THIS!!

Try reading around the topic, and doing your own independent work.
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exppex
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The thing I found most useful was good time management and being organised. Have page dividers for each section in each module for each subject. Title, date and number ALL your notes while referring to each textbook/source you got the information from. Work your way through by doing a significant number of questions in each exercise, using the answers available to check your work. Keep up to date and allocate time each day and use some of your free periods to compile your notes and stay organised and on top of things.

The first thing you should do for the coming academic year is get a full copy of the specification from your exam board for each module. Read through it not once, but twice so you are familiar with what the exam board requires from you. If information from your teacher contradicts information from the exam board, always follow information from the exam board. Sadly, not all teachers are entirely accurate in what they say due to being misinformed.

Next, get as many copies of past exam papers and corresponding mark schemes for all your subjects ready ahead of time until you are familiar enough with the specification and able to work through them and evaluate what you do and don't know. Exam technique is just as important as knowledge in the subject. Unfortunately credit is given for regurgitating the mark scheme, so stick to it as much as possible and answer every question you can as concisely and accurately as possible.

If you don't understand something in class, get help from your teacher or classmates then and there. Don't put if off because it will not make things better, and likely hinder you in future. Make note of sections you find difficult and get wrong more often. Spend a disproportionate amount of your time on these sections (even though you won't want to) until you feel comfortable with them to move on.

Get coursework out of the way as soon as possible. Jump through the hoops you need to by following the specification. While your teacher may not be able to help, that doesn't mean other people cannot

Marks in AS modules tend to be easier to get than in A2 modules, and they have the same weighting, so they are ideal for resits if you need them. If you can, try and get it right first time though, since resits cost, and can accumulate, making things harder than they ought to be - so be consistent.

Find the way you work best, and stick to it. Often this is in isolation, in a clear, calm environment with no distractions. It may be boring, but it is often the most effective. Try and get as much practice as you need to acheive your requirements. The more you do, the more it will be pay off later.

Other than that, work hard, but remember to enjoy yourself too. :yep:
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TheMeister
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#538
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(Original post by nuodai)
I'd disagree with the OP a bit; not because she's wrong, but because I just preferred to do things in a different way.

Staying organised is absolutely essential, I'll agree wholeheartedly there. Make folders for each subject, and each module of each subject, and perhaps even each topic of each module. Make summary sheets for each topic/module/subject so you have something to refer to quickly when it comes to revision, so that you spend more time revising rather than planning revision.

It's also a good idea to look back on all the work you've done so far every week or couple of weeks -- it takes little effort, and you'll find it so much easier to recall information doing that than if you haven't covered a topic for 8 months and are trying to remember it. It's also worth making revision notes as you go along rather than cramming a load of revision notes in a month before the exam -- this kills two birds with one stone, because it makes the weekly/biweekly look-back more brief (but just as effective).

As for what teachers say, it is usually correct but you'd be surprised how often it isn't. Now's a good chance to really take on responsibility for your own education: look at the syllabus for your subject and make sure you're learning what you need to learn. If you get told something in class, make a note of it, but then verify that your notes are correct by looking at a variety of sources: textbooks, the internet, etc. If you think something is missing, learn it -- you'll find a lot of people, even on this forum, whose teachers left out content (accidentally or on purpose). It almost happened to my Further Maths class until a couple of us realised the teacher had left out an entire chapter!

As for free periods, they were my ultimate relaxation times. I found it better to relax when I was at school and with my friends, sat in the cafe with a coffee or whatever, and then do all the work I needed to do when I was alone at home. I had to make TV sacrifices and the like, but it really paid off in the end. It also means that there are less distractions, and it helps you manage your time: you can still go out and have fun, but make sure you put aside enough time to do all the work you need to do.

And asking for help is always a good idea, but only if you've exhausted all possibilities of finding the answer to your question by yourself. From my own experience it's much more effective (and rewarding) to work something out by yourself than it is to just be told by someone; it sticks in your mind and makes it feel like more of an achievement. If you're asking your friends for help, rather than teachers, don't believe what you hear until you've heard it from a reliable source as well.

Other than that, the rest is up to you!
Duly noted. :ta:
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StandardStudent
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#539
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Up your game couple months leading up to the exam. E.g. designate enough time for each subject.
Also learn the outline of the spec and what scores you need to get for each grade (80% =A etc.), it keeps you more focussed on the UMS you need to get for each module.
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NATNAEL
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You should have an interest in your subjects firstly. This is essential.
I studying Math alevel in my first year and so had to have folders for different modules and stay well organised.It helps, when studying maths to read the text book , try out the examples and answers the questions, not only from the textbook but also from exam questions. The more you practise the more confident you will become for the exam.

~I also studied Physics and Chemistry and found it useful to write plenty of notes , look over them several times a day , every other day and also read around the subject helps, as it brodens youknowledge and makes you more confident in yourr subject. Once you have become confident in a subject like chemistry or Physics, you will breeze thruogh the exam but the only way to tdo this is by doinbg what i have said.

I did all of the above and during my free lessons I did study and In my AS exams this summer i recieved AAA with a 94 percent averagein maths.
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