Change From Yr11 To Sixth Form Watch

penny_wishes
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#541
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#541
exppex's advice pretty much covers it.

My tip is: If you want a B or a C grade, you will just do what is set in class.
If you want an A grade, you will read around the subject, you will use every practise exam paper you can get your hands on, and you will create a list of other possible 40 mark questions that could come up (adapt this to the new syllabus question style, since I think this may have changed) and practise them too. You will learn to criticise everything in order to come up with balanced arguments (essential in sociology and philosophy, not sure about other humanities). Learn the perfect structure for essays, plan your essays, plan any other possible essays that could be asked.

And most of all...

Mind maps are your new best revision friend
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Cicerao
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#542
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#542
Don't use all your effort trying to be organised. ;D
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fletcheroo
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#543
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#543
To be fair, i found more often than not the teacher isn't right alot of the time, it's up to you to revise and learn the work neccesary for the course, we spent alot of class time and homeworks on things which didn't help us at all.

And as for me, i rarely used free for work as it was too loud and talkative in my experience - if you genuinely need to do work move somewhere quite and alone so you cannot be distracted and can work in peace

As for organising, it's pretty important you have all your work filed correctly. Also make sure to complete outstanding notes.
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brokenangel
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#544
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#544
be organised
write your notes up as a revision exercise regularily
Work your arse of it may not be cool but missing you uni offer is hell

Enjoy it and have fun
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dumbdunc
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#545
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#545
People really love organisation....

I spent most of the last two years hunting out random scraps of paper that made up my 'notes'. I still got AAA. If disorganisation works for you there's no problem with a bit of orderly chaos!
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Sato
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#546
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#546
The only dumb question is the unasked question.
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katesummer
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#547
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#547
thank you, really good advice guys
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doggyfizzel
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#548
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#548
In the run up to exams ie. 3-4 weeks YOU HAVE NOTHING BETTER TO DO THAN REVISE!!! The feeling after you fail to achieve what you want is terrible, avoid at all costs!

As for the organisation, don't be cool and use paper, use books like you always have done, keeps everything together in order and makes things so easy to find.
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Degausser
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#549
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#549
(Original post by dumbdunc)
People really love organisation....

I spent most of the last two years hunting out random scraps of paper that made up my 'notes'. I still got AAA. If disorganisation works for you there's no problem with a bit of orderly chaos!

As much as I should probably try and hide it, this. My notes ended up quite a mess so that eventually i just revised from text books and revision guides.

I'll change for next year though :teeth:
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matt2k8
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#550
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I managed to get straight As at AS, and these are basically the main rules I followed:
- NEVER EVER get behind, ALWAYS stay ontop of everything or it'll pile up near the exam and you'll either have to cram like mad or fail.
- revise EFFICIENTLY in a way that works for you - if you feel nothing is sinking in try another revision method or you'll just be wasting time. I've found the best way to revise for me is to do exam-style questions, and that I can concentrate much much better in college or in the local library - so I simply stick to doing exam-style questions and do all my revision either in college or in the local library - I probably do more work than most people but spend less actual time on it.
- (depends on the subject slightly), try and link all topics of the course to eachother and see it all as one subject rather than individual topics. I seem to do this naturally (heck, ask me 5mins after a lesson what topic I did about and I'll have forgotten what I actually did about lmao, but given a question where the knowledge from the lesson is needed and I'll answer it just fine), but a lot of people seem not to. You'll need to do this in the exam so it's best to get used to it even if the work you do in class is often just about one specific topic.
- make sure to keep your stuff fairly organised, especially if your preffered method of revision is reading notes (although I personally found I get almost nothing off reading back notes, and I might aswell throw the answers to practice questions I do in the bin asoon as they are marked!)
- if other people try and put you down (intentionally or not), just remember you are doing it for YOURSELF and your OWN FUTURE.
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NigzyLFC
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#551
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#551
It's the best time of your life. Make the most of it ;D!
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surreal
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#552
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#552
Simple, AS levels are an excercise in memorising and regurgitating key terms. Memorise and then regurgitate the key terms.
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02mik_e
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#553
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#553
lol i was never fully organised for my A-levels. I just had a load of random books which i wrote in.

My advice would be to know how to play the A-level game if you're doing essay based subjects. Other than that work hard at AS so A2 becomes a breeze
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paniking_and_not_revising
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#554
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#554
They're not really similar but don't you want a more diverse range of subjects?
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DoDaDa111
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#555
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#555
I'll keep my advice short and sweet, partly because I know most new a-level students will have forgotten it by september and because I'd be lying if I said I kept organised, did work in free periods etc.

-A Levels ARE a step up from GCSE, it's bigger for some than others but good GCSEs do not guarantee good A levels. I remember the first day in Physics our teacher asked us to write down our GCSE results in Maths and Physics, I smugly wrote down A* for both, fast forward 11 months and I had an E at AS and dropped it as I messed around

-Make sure you'll be able to understand your notes when it comes to revision, explain steps and write down the question, so when you're looking at past questions you can find a similar question you did 8+ months back and see how you should go about solving it.
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Eccentric
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#556
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#556
Yeah like previous posts, enjoy the experience and take on as many extra curricular activities that your interested in.
Also going for prefect/official role in the subject you will be taking to degree level is a good idea as it has already given me a lot to talk about in my personal statement.
Furthermore take note of the cliché "Begin revising a few months before your exams".
I only revised about 2 months before my AS's and got alright grades still need to do resits. The quality of revision however is more important than quantity.

Also another good tip (going a bit more into revision and off topic) is to get your parents to distract you with talking around you or turning the hoover on etc if you do any practice papers at home.
You would be surprised how much difference it makes to your mental blocking of the surrounding environment during the exam

Again sorry for going off topic and rambling!
Enjoy sixth form while it lasts

Chris
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dumbgeek
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#557
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#557
(Original post by Sports Racer)
The most important rule to follow: Do your ******* work. Don't get complacent, don't get lazy, don't be stupid.

Organise yourself in the simplest and most effective way possible. Don't go overboard on stationery, don't spend more time planning revision than doing it.
In terms of equipment, you need the following:
black pen x2
mechanical pencil with rubber end x2
ruler (maybe)
spiral writing pad
lever arch folder

Write all notes and homeworks in spiral pad and tear them out and archive in lever arch (at home). (This is the way I did it. Use your own system if it works for you but DON'T WASTE TIME. You can shove all your work in your text books as long as you know what you're doing and handing good work in on time. Most people spend lessons 'organising' themselves by rearranging all their files or putting pieces of paper in wallets. Don't be them.)

Every half term consolidate existing knowledge. Make sure you're on top of everything. Make revision notes for the topics covered so far. This will really help you out come exam time.

Discipline. Don't tell yourself you'll do work in your frees when you won't. Make rules for yourself and stick to them. If you find yourself doing shoddy essays on Sunday evening then do something about it.

Time to take education in your own hands. Download the specifications and make sure you know everything that is on it. If your teacher goes outside the syllabus DISCARD this information (by go outside I mean teaches you NEW topics, NOT general good-to-include stuff about things that are already on the syllabus). If some bits are missed out SELF-TEACH them because YOUR GRADES are YOUR PROBLEM.
"Download the specifications and make sure you know everything that is on it"

This is also what i'm thinking of doing, if i know the whole spec the i see no reason for less than 90%

but i was told by a friend that she knew everything in the spec and when she done the exam random questions popped up which weren't in the spec or the textbook . This has made me feel more pesimistic towards a-levels.
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Sports Racer
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#558
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#558
(Original post by dumbgeek)
"Download the specifications and make sure you know everything that is on it"

This is also what i'm thinking of doing, if i know the whole spec the i see no reason for less than 90%

but i was told by a friend that she knew everything in the spec and when she done the exam random questions popped up which weren't in the spec or the textbook . This has made me feel more pesimistic towards a-levels.
Your friend either downloaded the wrong spec or didn't revise all of it. They will always stick to the spec.
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theciz
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#559
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#559
(Original post by Sports Racer)
Your friend either downloaded the wrong spec or didn't revise all of it. They will always stick to the spec.
Not true. First question of my first exam, History of Art, we got asked something that wasn't in the spec. It's lucky our teacher mentioned it once briefly in a lesson, so I was able to use that and common sense to figure out an answer, but she was well pissed off when we showed the question paper to her after wards.

I shouldn't really complain, as I nearly got full marks in that paper, but if it'd been something a little harder than the differences in uses of stone and bronze, we'd all have been quite ******.
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Eccentric
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#560
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#560
Yeah don't depend on the spec to save your butt.
A levels aren't about being spoon fed like at GCSE you need to do your own independent study to do well.
Get used to it cause the quality of independent study you do will define you at degree level from a 1:1 to a 2:1.
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