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    Hi.

    I am a student at Bournemouth doing a Media degree but I want to switch my pathway towards primary school teaching. I hate the media course but I don't want to waste the year I have done so was thinking of going to the Open Uni to do an Open degree but I don't know if it's for me?

    Please could someone give me some advice about what it's like studying here? Has anyone been in the same situation as me and did you regret leaving uni or do you think you have made the right decision?

    I am pretty worried about the independent learning aspect of it. I know a degree is of course more independent, but do you get sufficient support if you need it?

    Many thanks, Ashley x
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    (Original post by ashlove)
    Hi.

    I am a student at Bournemouth doing a Media degree but I want to switch my pathway towards primary school teaching. I hate the media course but I don't want to waste the year I have done so was thinking of going to the Open Uni to do an Open degree but I don't know if it's for me?

    Please could someone give me some advice about what it's like studying here? Has anyone been in the same situation as me and did you regret leaving uni or do you think you have made the right decision?

    I am pretty worried about the independent learning aspect of it. I know a degree is of course more independent, but do you get sufficient support if you need it?

    Many thanks, Ashley x
    I'm doing an open degree, and I want to be a primary school teacher

    Basically you need 360 points for a degree, and do courses in 30 or 60 point chunks (they were doing 10 and 15 point ones but someone told me these are being phased out.) You can study full time (120 points per year) or part time (60 points or less.) Because you have been at uni you may be able to transfer credit from some of the modules you have already done.

    For the 30 and 60 point courses you are allocated a tutor, and also have access to a forum where you can discuss things with others on the course (although Facebook groups tend to be more active, I have found.) You can generally email or phone your tutor, some hold tutorials where you travel to them, and they are the person who marks your essays etc. How supportive they are of course depends on the individual tutor!

    I personally enjoy the independent aspect of it, but I've been learning like this since I was in year 11.

    Hopes this helps a bit.
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    (Original post by Lazuliblue)
    I'm doing an open degree, and I want to be a primary school teacher

    Basically you need 360 points for a degree, and do courses in 30 or 60 point chunks (they were doing 10 and 15 point ones but someone told me these are being phased out.) You can study full time (120 points per year) or part time (60 points or less.) Because you have been at uni you may be able to transfer credit from some of the modules you have already done.

    For the 30 and 60 point courses you are allocated a tutor, and also have access to a forum where you can discuss things with others on the course (although Facebook groups tend to be more active, I have found.) You can generally email or phone your tutor, some hold tutorials where you travel to them, and they are the person who marks your essays etc. How supportive they are of course depends on the individual tutor!

    I personally enjoy the independent aspect of it, but I've been learning like this since I was in year 11.

    Hopes this helps a bit.
    Thank you so much yes it does help! I do really like the idea of the open uni...hopefully employers will not look down on the fact that I have swapped courses?
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    (Original post by ashlove)
    Hi.

    I am a student at Bournemouth doing a Media degree but I want to switch my pathway towards primary school teaching. I hate the media course but I don't want to waste the year I have done so was thinking of going to the Open Uni to do an Open degree but I don't know if it's for me?

    Please could someone give me some advice about what it's like studying here? Has anyone been in the same situation as me and did you regret leaving uni or do you think you have made the right decision?

    I am pretty worried about the independent learning aspect of it. I know a degree is of course more independent, but do you get sufficient support if you need it?

    Many thanks, Ashley x
    Hi Ashley,

    I've been in a sort-of-similar situation to you. I didn't want my foundation degree to be a complete waste, so I looked at options for building on it. I got a little bit of credit transfer with The OU and am currently doing a named degree.

    I would strongly suggest, if you haven't already, that you take your concerns to your institution's student services or, if you have an idea of the type of course you want to do, have a chat with one of the faculty heads to see if there's any way of transferring to a different course.

    If that's not possible... Think very carefully about study with The OU, particularly if you have concerns about the independent route. The level of support varies wildly between courses and there isn't any overarching support for you as a degree student (ie, you only get support on a per-module basis). Those tutors who take you during the day at your current institution? Some of them will be OU tutors in their spare time, ie you won't have access to them as often or easily. Some of them are easy to get in touch with by phone and email, others aren't and you can be waiting more than a week to hear back from them in some instances. It's not right and it's not all tutors, but it does happen and it can induce the very worst anxieties when a deadline is looming and you desperately need help.

    If you're still set on OU study, it would be worth looking at a named degree if you have a particular subject in mind that you would prefer to study. Many OU degrees allow for relevant credit transfer and have a certain amount of 'free choice' in which modules you choose, which you can also count towards. With 120 credits, I'd be surprised if you were awarded less than 90 credits at Level 1, leaving you with only 30 credits of mandatory modules to choose as part of a named degree.

    Whilst it sounds like you still have the opportunity, I'd strive to stay in place at an institution where you have the advantage of so much more support and resources to draw on.
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    (Original post by ashlove)
    Thank you so much yes it does help! I do really like the idea of the open uni...hopefully employers will not look down on the fact that I have swapped courses?
    I shouldn't think they'd look down on you, as in general OU degrees are well respected. Anyone who does an OU degree needs a high amount of motivation and self-discipline and this will be valued by any employer.
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    (Original post by jsp_1983)
    Hi Ashley,

    I've been in a sort-of-similar situation to you. I didn't want my foundation degree to be a complete waste, so I looked at options for building on it. I got a little bit of credit transfer with The OU and am currently doing a named degree.

    I would strongly suggest, if you haven't already, that you take your concerns to your institution's student services or, if you have an idea of the type of course you want to do, have a chat with one of the faculty heads to see if there's any way of transferring to a different course.

    If that's not possible... Think very carefully about study with The OU, particularly if you have concerns about the independent route. The level of support varies wildly between courses and there isn't any overarching support for you as a degree student (ie, you only get support on a per-module basis). Those tutors who take you during the day at your current institution? Some of them will be OU tutors in their spare time, ie you won't have access to them as often or easily. Some of them are easy to get in touch with by phone and email, others aren't and you can be waiting more than a week to hear back from them in some instances. It's not right and it's not all tutors, but it does happen and it can induce the very worst anxieties when a deadline is looming and you desperately need help.

    If you're still set on OU study, it would be worth looking at a named degree if you have a particular subject in mind that you would prefer to study. Many OU degrees allow for relevant credit transfer and have a certain amount of 'free choice' in which modules you choose, which you can also count towards. With 120 credits, I'd be surprised if you were awarded less than 90 credits at Level 1, leaving you with only 30 credits of mandatory modules to choose as part of a named degree.

    Whilst it sounds like you still have the opportunity, I'd strive to stay in place at an institution where you have the advantage of so much more support and resources to draw on.
    Thank you very much for the information it has definitely made me think more about the support i would potentially get at the OU vs. the support in university. Unfortunately I have not been given any sufficient support from Bournemouth and so even if I don't at the OU, I will be doing degree that will be more interesting than the one I am doing now, hopefully!

    I think your idea of a named degree is a good one, however because of my Primary school teacher aspirations, i'm thinking that an open degree will show my flexibility and love of all subjects

    Once again, thank you for the advice!
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    (Original post by ashlove)
    Thank you very much for the information it has definitely made me think more about the support i would potentially get at the OU vs. the support in university. Unfortunately I have not been given any sufficient support from Bournemouth and so even if I don't at the OU, I will be doing degree that will be more interesting than the one I am doing now, hopefully!

    I think your idea of a named degree is a good one, however because of my Primary school teacher aspirations, i'm thinking that an open degree will show my flexibility and love of all subjects

    Once again, thank you for the advice!
    Well, despite the Open Degree being the most popular and flexible towards what you are interested in, it still suffers from the perception that it's a bit 'flaky'. It might not be entirely unjustified, as the Open Degree seems to have been designed for those who learn for pleasure (which there is absolutely nothing wrong with at all. If anything, it's the best reason for learning!). There might also be implications for any funding you might be eligible for as part of any future training: http://www.education.gov.uk/get-into...aduate-funding

    Whatever you choose, make sure you feel well-informed about it and know that it's the right thing for you. If you have nagging doubts after making a choice... Don't be afraid to revisit it. Trust me - it will save a lot of time and pain in future. Good luck
 
 
 
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