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    Hi guys,

    I'm a year 11 student and I will be going to my school's sixth form next year (St John Fishers & St Aidans Associated Sixth Form) and I know it may seem too early to be considering my university but for some reason I can't help but feel the need to stop thinking about it.

    I wish to pursue a career in the film industry and I know the UK is a good place to do that but the US has such more opportunities, and I am aware that the film industry (especially in the US) is extremely competitive and that I have small chances on achieving my dream.

    I would like to know how hard it is to get into university in the US and how UK students from a middle/working class background get there, I have never been there and I am a British citizen. My family isn't rich but we're in the middle, but I'm pretty sure my parents wouldn't be able to pay the fees which I'm guessing are pretty steep.

    Not sure if this matters but I am getting A*- B grades in my GCSE's and will be receiving 10 of them, and I hope to receive straight A's at A-Level standard (Media Studies, Geography, Spanish and English Literature).

    I am looking at going to a university in a big city (NYU, USC). Open to suggestions,

    Thank You.
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    Take a look at this website: http://www.fulbright.org.uk/study-in-the-usa, it may give you some help.

    Fees are typically going to be upwards of $26,000 per year for a number of institutions. You could also consider a year abroad course that are run in a number of universities, where you spend a year abroad at the cost of your home tuition (sometimes less) and is covered by UK student loans. Also be aware that you will have restrictions on work whilst out studying in the states. On an F visa this is 20 hours per week, strictly on-campus jobs.

    If you have any particular questions about things I can try my best to answer them. I spent a year studying in America as part of my degree and it was a wonderful experience!
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    (Original post by williamfifteen)
    I wish to pursue a career in the film industry and I know the UK is a good place to do that but the US has such more opportunities, and I am aware that the film industry (especially in the US) is extremely competitive and that I have small chances on achieving my dream.
    If the US dream doesn't work out, it's worth bearing in mind that films on the most recent Oscar-nominated film list involved more than 80 graduates of the Bournemouth Uni Media School degrees.

    I don't know about a lack of opportunity in this country, but that track record sounds pretty good for a single UK university.
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    You clearly have the best Film&TV schools pinpointed already, so on to your admission.

    US unis are a whole different ballgame to UCAS. The following are all key factors in your application:

    1.) Do you need financial aid? If not, you still have to be good, but if yes, you have to be outstanding.
    2.) Your SAT - might count less for the sort of thing you're applying for, but doing well in it never hurts. In case you haven't encountered it before, the SAT is the Scholastic Aptitude Test. It is divided into three sections worth 800 points each. Maths, Writing, and Critical Reading. You'll be able to find average scores of admitted students online. There may be someone at your 6th form who can assist you with arranging your testing or you may have to do it on your own initiative. Either way, get started ASAP as most American Unis allow more than one attempt and scores tend to improve the more you try.
    3.) Your grades - Here, do your utmost to stand out. If everyone at your college does 3 AS levels, do 4. However, always aim for top marks. It's better to have 4 A*s than 3, but it's also better to have 3 A*s than 2 and 2 As.
    4.) Your extracurriculars. Generally most people you're competing with will play an instrument moderately well, have participated in a team sport/debating of some sort, be involved with charitable work, have held some sort of leadership position and have multiple activities related to their intended course of study.
    5.) Your admissions essays and references. You will have to demonstrate a real passion for your subject/an original perspective/something, anything to make you stand out. Additionally the more you can get your teachers to rave about you, the better.

    The fact that you are applying to such top programs and that you cannot afford to pay your full ride (which is entirely the fault of the ludicrous fees these places get away with charging, I might add) means that you basically need to either be very strong in each area, or really, truly excel in one or more.

    It's not easy, but it's not impossible. I managed to gain admission to several very respectable schools, and scholarships to other less respectable schools, without being in any sense of the word a fantastic candidate, dedicated scholar or Mother Teresa incarnate. In any case, I hope I was able to help and if you have any further questions just ask.
 
 
 
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