Prestige, Course or Campus @ Uni.... Watch

Poll: How are you influenced in Uni Choices
Prestige is majorly influential (54)
10.91%
Prestige is fairly influential (34)
6.87%
Prestige is slightly influential (9)
1.82%
Prestige is not influential (7)
1.41%
A campus university was a factor i considered (33)
6.67%
A city university was a factor i considered (39)
7.88%
The atmosphere was a factor i considered (56)
11.31%
The student reputation/general character was a factor (51)
10.3%
League table position was a factor i considered (59)
11.92%
The nightlife was a factor i considered (27)
5.45%
The course content was a factor i considered (76)
15.35%
The accomodation was a fctor i considered (38)
7.68%
I am also influenced by other factors (please explain!) (12)
2.42%
MattG
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#21
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#21
league tables are stupid, the variables are so wide and in 5+ whatever years when you are applying for a new job your uni/course could be right down the table lol, its just a silly superificial thing.

Course Content is a biggie, I'm actually quite glad that I went to my insurance and not my first choice (leeds) as that was straight history, which after A levels I was getting annoyed with, and I really enjoy International Relations. Also the ability to try other subjects not in my course, I did international development in my first year which I found interesting.

Prestige I suppose is a factor, but it does vary, like you wouldn't consider Aberystwyth as an amazing prestigious uni overall, but for International Relations its a quality place to go to study. I get pissed off with these people who only think in terms of prestige.

on the other hand my housemate has family friends who went to cambridge years ago and some can't remember what classifications they got as "cambridge" was enough lol, thankfully its changing as universities get more competitive and jobs are no longer just about where you graduated from.

another thing my housemate said, "we're going to come out with a degree from a redbrick university, thats nothing to be sniffed at" and i suppose its true, but I think having been at uni for 2 years you do realise the idiots that come to uni, and the actual effort people put in, so overall reputation of the "quality" of a uni is diminished (or increased in some cases)
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Johnny
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#22
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#22
Well my course (RR17) is only offered at ten universities (eleven including my nearest university, but I didn't particularly want to end up there although it's a lovely university. Stretch my wings 'n' all that): University of Bath, University of Bristol, University of Exeter, University of Glasgow, University of Leeds, The University of Manchester, The University of Nottingham, Queen Mary, University of London, The University of Sheffield and the University of St Andrews. Obviously all of these have a great reputation, so that didn't really factor into the decision making process.

I didn't fancy living in London at all, so that rules QM, UoL out at the first hurdle. Glasgow and St. Andrews are too far away and I would barely have been able to afford flights/the train at the start and end of term -- let alone have enough cash to pop back for the odd weekend! I was also rather averse to living in an industrial, northern/midlands city because that's too much like home (and I wanted a totally new experience, city-wise, although I did toy with Sheffield and Leeds).

So then I was down to Bristol, Bath and Exeter. I simply fell in love with Bristol on an all-expenses-paid residential visit to study German and Czech. The university, city, course, and department were exactly what I wanted (and how I had expected them to be). The last two failed to grab me in the same way and felt like smaller versions of the same sort of thing really.

So that's how I chose my university. Ultra-logically I suppose.
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Agrippina
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#23
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#23
I chose Oxford for lots of reasons:

- I felt that the way in which I learn - thanks to the way I've been bought up (I was educated at home most of my life) - would be ideally suited to the tutorial system. This combined with the quality of the tuition and the numerous opportunities to build on what I'll learn means that educationally, Oxford is absolutely ideal for me.

- The course looks brilliant, with a lot of choice, really interesting-looking modules, and access to amazing resources like the Ashmolean Museum (which is just over the road from my future college!). I'll also get to take part in an archaeological dig abroad as part of the course, and I'll be given a substantial amount of cash from the college/university in order to do so.

- The course and the educational experience as a whole will also be excellent preparation for a future career.

- I can't deny that prestige was a factor in my choice. I also think, on a related note, that having been educated at home, in a way I wanted to prove myself. And finally, when I went to sixth form, I wasn't challenged much at all - it was easier after home education - so I think I'll thrive on the challenge of an Oxford degree.

- I absolutely love the city - it's completely stunning and I fell in love with it. I've always been really interested in old buildings so in Oxford, I'm in my element.

- On the social side, I like the fact that at Oxford, it seems that you're not shunned for being "different" from the others. Having been educated at home, I was rather disillusioned when I went to a sixth form to do A levels and found a load of SHEEP, basically - sheep, furthermore, who exhibited prejudice towards me purely because of my having been educated at home. This made my two years at sixth form pretty miserable. When I stayed at St John's for interviews, I felt for the first time that I fitted in somewhere and that people accepted the fact that I was unconventional. Also, I was among like-minded people who enjoy studying and are not of the attitude that it's not "cool" to study!

So those are the main reasons... sorry for the long post!
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ChemistBoy
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Rachel)
- On the social side, I like the fact that at Oxford, it seems that you're not shunned for being "different" from the others.
It is no different at many other universities.
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Agrippina
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#25
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#25
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
It is no different at many other universities.
I never said it was, this is just one of the many aspects I like about Oxford, which is why I mentioned it. I never said it was exclusive to Oxford.
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White_redrose
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#26
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#26
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
It is no different at many other universities.
Mm, maybe...but then I can appreciate what Rachel says. Not to perpetuate an Oxbridge myth, but I doubt I'd have found so many like-minded people elsewhere. Fair enough, yeah, with some other universities might be the same...but I'm not so sure that tag could be applied to 'many' universities.
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ChemistBoy
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#27
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#27
(Original post by White_redrose)
Mm, maybe...but then I can appreciate what Rachel says. Not to perpetuate an Oxbridge myth, but I doubt I'd have found so many like-minded people elsewhere. Fair enough, yeah, with some other universities might be the same...but I'm not so sure that tag could be applied to 'many' universities.
I wasn't talking about finding like-minded people I was talking about finding accepting people (this was what I highlighted in my quote). Most of the people I have dealt with at both the universities I have attended have been very accepting of myself and other people who may not be the "norm" - they may not be like-minded, but they are not close-minded.
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ChemistBoy
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Rachel)
I never said it was, this is just one of the many aspects I like about Oxford, which is why I mentioned it. I never said it was exclusive to Oxford.
Quite, but in the context of the debate, i.e. what was important in choosing a particular university, one could be forgiven for thinking that you were implying it as a unique property for the particular institution you were discussing.
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Alan Smithee
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#29
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#29
All Oxbridgians think that.

There are probably MORE people like them at Oxbridge, that's all it is.
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Agrippina
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#30
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#30
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Quite, but in the context of the debate, i.e. what was important in choosing a particular university, one could be forgiven for thinking that you were implying it as a unique property for the particular institution you were discussing.
Not really that important, is it? You could say the same thing about various other points that I made, such as the nice architecture, course etc. Why pick up on this particular point?
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Agrippina
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Platocrates)
All Oxbridgians think that.

There are probably MORE people like them at Oxbridge, that's all it is.
I've yet to find anyone my age who's "like me" so that's a very good thing.
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ChemistBoy
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Rachel)
Not really that important, is it? You could say the same thing about various other points that I made, such as the nice architecture, course etc. Why pick up on this particular point?
The architecture and course particulars are unique to Oxford, aren't they? The same cannot be said for how you would be incorporated into the student body. All universities are far more diverse than schools and sixth form colleges and I highly doubt you would be "shunned" because of your educational background at any university.

I made the point because, as I said, in the context of the debate it seemed to be implied that your point only applied to Oxford and that other universities would be more like the sixth form college you studied at.
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Agrippina
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#33
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#33
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
The architecture and course particulars are unique to Oxford, aren't they? The same cannot be said for how you would be incorporated into the student body. All universities are far more diverse than schools and sixth form colleges and I highly doubt you would be "shunned" because of your educational background at any university.

I made the point because, as I said, in the context of the debate it seemed to be implied that your point only applied to Oxford and that other universities would be more like the sixth form college you studied at.
Fine, fine, I should have worded it *slightly* differently then. End of. :s:
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ChemistBoy
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Rachel)
I've yet to find anyone my age who's "like me" so that's a very good thing.
Good for you. Of course, being with loads of people who are similar is a bit boring.
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Agrippina
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#35
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#35
(Original post by ChemistBoy)
Good for you. Of course, being with loads of people who are similar is a bit boring.
Yes, hence ref. to sheep in my original post.
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