Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I ask, because the reaction I generally get to telling people i'm considering it is all doom and gloom.

    Anyways, some background.

    I left university 2 years ago insanely confused with a first in physics. I've always been very naturally adept at exams so I've never had to work hard in my life. It's all gravy, apart from the fact that I coasted all the way up until graduation and then hit a brick wall. I was also quite the slacker back then and so left university with the same maturity and independence that I went in with.

    I went into a patent law job which was a disaster and had left within 6 weeks. My confidence was in tatters. As my finance knowledge was nil, I decided to go for an ACA training contract as they have quite lenient entry standards when it comes to my finance background. As my confidence was so low, the big 4 scared me and so I applied to top 20 firms and landed a job.

    So fast forward to today where i'm 7 months in. I've passed 9 exams with relative ease, my finance and current affairs knowledge is the envy of my friends now, and my confidence is back. The problem...AUDIT IS KILLING ME.

    It's soul destroying. It's mind numbing. I may only have 6 exams left (which everyone is so quick to point out) but I actually have 2 years and 6 months until I qualify. My mind needs to be learning, needs to be stimulated otherwise i'm wasting time where I could be growing. So as you guessed, I want to leave. Everyone is so quick to shriek that an ACA opens so many doors and is a great way to a stable income but surely success is up here *points to brain* rather than in the letters after my name.

    I'm at a philosophical point in my life where I'd actually like to go travelling for a year independently which to me is a real education. Learn a language, read a truck load of literature, meet like (and not so like) minded people and learn through real experience.

    As you'd expect my parents and the older generation aren't so supportive. Their paradigms and beliefs are different to mine. In their opinion, if I quit, no employer will EVER take another chance on me as I look like a quitter.
    In my opinion, I'll be more independent and more confident than before I left my job. And the comparison to when I first landed my accountancy job is gargantuan - I'm now a part qualified accountant (which must account for something!), will have 18 months work experience before I leave and i'm generally far more educated. Surely one crazy employer will take a chance on me when I get back? (p.s i'm considering consultancy for the travel).

    What do you think?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think you are looking for an excuse for this escape, and are risking yourself's future. Please note that the view point of your parents represents a general attitude of your future potential employers - as they are the same generation with your parents.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I should add. If anybody is considering a training contract then i'm happy to give my opinion. My experience is negative and it's not for me but i'll try to be as objective as possible. I'd really appreciate some advice as well.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the response. Not necessarily - I actually wanted to quit far before I wanted to travel. It'd just seem like the right time.

    Another 30 months is a long time to do something I hate - especially when I don't want an ACA and don't want to be seen as an expert in financial accounting considering I quite dislike it.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jordforce)
    I should add. If anybody is considering a training contract then i'm happy to give my opinion. My experience is negative and it's not for me but i'll try to be as objective as possible. I'd really appreciate some advice as well.
    Hi jordforce, I can't really give you any help personally but two of my friends have gone through the same thing and managed to get jobs elsewhere. As a soon to be trainee I was wondering if you can elaborate on why you don't like the ACA training or more specifically audit. I am assuming that you are in a top 20 firm right now. I will be joining a non big 4 top 10 firm this September in audit and so I think to some degree your experience may be similar to what I may go through.

    I have read in a number of places that people really don't seem too fond of the whole ACA training contract/audit. I also know of 3 people doing the ACA training contract of which 2 of them left after just over a year. However I am still interested in this route and I would like to give it my best.

    Anyway with regards to the two people, one of them has left to be an analyst in a bank and the other has gone in a completely different field. Both of these people are in a top 10 firm and a part of me is actually scared of why they are leaving as I know a boatload of people will die for this opportunity. They found a new job with relative ease as their employer was really interested in their experience of which I suppose is what you have as well. However, they found a job whilst on their training contract and they have been at their respective firms for around 18 months which is slightly longer what you stated so you may consider this an option as well.

    So what is it about your job you don't like. Obviously its the nature of audit but is there any other places where you find it bad and what is it about audit that is bad?

    I know what you say may not necessarily apply to me but still it would be some good food for thought.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey NovaDragon and thanks for your response.

    The ACA is great. It's the audit that is absolutely terrible. Unfortunately qualifying is not just about passing the exams but you also need to do around three years of accountancy related work (in most cases - audit).

    So what is audit? (sorry if patronising but I have no idea how extensive your knowledge). Essentially every company over a certain size needs an audit by law. It gives assurance to any potential users of the financial statements that they are true and fair. The partner will deal with planning and designing the audit and the trainees role in all this is to do the field work.

    So a typical day for me would be having to fill out an excel worksheet tracing a sample of invoices, through their accounting system, through the BACS payment and finally to the bank statements - taking down all relevant details along the way.
    It is client facing and I have had the benefit of being exposed to client and i'm grateful to that but the novelty has worn off. On top of that, the only questions I generally get to ask are "could you find me invoice 33567 please?" and "why doesn't the Net and VAT of this invoice equal the Gross?". Obviously there's more but generally all questions are of that calibre and i feel absolutely pathetic while doing it.
    Obviously the work changes in year 2 and year 3 and I believe it get's slightly more enjoyable but stress levels rise too. In fact, most second and third years are just as disillusionised and confused as I am.

    Truthfully I don't feel like we add much value and in my opinion (though some may disagree) we're only there because it's statutory.

    Ok so as you can see I don't enjoy, but I'm not blaming the company - after all, it's the business model. They dangle an ACA carrot in out faces and we do audit in return.


    So the pros? Look, as I said, if you can handle 3 years of audit then it's a fair deal for many. I get lots of time off to study, I've made some good friends, I've learnt alot, it's somewhat client facing, eventually you get to lead audits (one reason i'd consider staying) and you get an ACA.

    There's no doubt somebody will tell me i'm wrong and I don't fancy getting caught in an argument, but for ME, it's just soul destroying and a waste of time where I could be learning and experiencing more.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In the current financial climate I would consider starting to apply to jobs whilst you're still doing your training contract and only quitting once you have something sorted out. This way you will also get to try and test whether there are employers who're willing to take you in.

    In the perfect world you could negotiate your new start date to be 6 months later, hand in your notice to your current employer and go travel.

    Bear in mind that you might also end up having to pay back some money to your current employer if you leave half way through a training contract.
    • Official TSR Representative
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Official TSR Representative
    (Original post by jordforce)
    I ask, because the reaction I generally get to telling people i'm considering it is all doom and gloom.

    Anyways, some background.

    I left university 2 years ago insanely confused with a first in physics. I've always been very naturally adept at exams so I've never had to work hard in my life. It's all gravy, apart from the fact that I coasted all the way up until graduation and then hit a brick wall. I was also quite the slacker back then and so left university with the same maturity and independence that I went in with.

    I went into a patent law job which was a disaster and had left within 6 weeks. My confidence was in tatters. As my finance knowledge was nil, I decided to go for an ACA training contract as they have quite lenient entry standards when it comes to my finance background. As my confidence was so low, the big 4 scared me and so I applied to top 20 firms and landed a job.

    So fast forward to today where i'm 7 months in. I've passed 9 exams with relative ease, my finance and current affairs knowledge is the envy of my friends now, and my confidence is back. The problem...AUDIT IS KILLING ME.

    It's soul destroying. It's mind numbing. I may only have 6 exams left (which everyone is so quick to point out) but I actually have 2 years and 6 months until I qualify. My mind needs to be learning, needs to be stimulated otherwise i'm wasting time where I could be growing. So as you guessed, I want to leave. Everyone is so quick to shriek that an ACA opens so many doors and is a great way to a stable income but surely success is up here *points to brain* rather than in the letters after my name.

    I'm at a philosophical point in my life where I'd actually like to go travelling for a year independently which to me is a real education. Learn a language, read a truck load of literature, meet like (and not so like) minded people and learn through real experience.

    As you'd expect my parents and the older generation aren't so supportive. Their paradigms and beliefs are different to mine. In their opinion, if I quit, no employer will EVER take another chance on me as I look like a quitter.
    In my opinion, I'll be more independent and more confident than before I left my job. And the comparison to when I first landed my accountancy job is gargantuan - I'm now a part qualified accountant (which must account for something!), will have 18 months work experience before I leave and i'm generally far more educated. Surely one crazy employer will take a chance on me when I get back? (p.s i'm considering consultancy for the travel).

    What do you think?
    Hi there

    I'm really sorry you are unhappy in your current role and hope that you can find what you're looking for. For those of us that have been working for a while, we know how draining it can be when you are unhappy in your job.

    I was just wondering, have you spoken to your managers or your QPRT? Is it worth having a conversation about how you feel? I'm sure you won't be the first to doubt whether they have taken the right path.

    Whatever you decide though, good luck.

    Louise
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey String_bean. That's actually great advice to get looking for jobs to test the water before taking the plunge (metaphors galore).

    Fortunately I read the small print on my contract and they only expect the fees if I intend or they believe I intend to continue my ACA elsewhere, which isn't the case!


    Hey Louise. Thanks for your concern! No I haven't spoken to them about it, and I suppose I'm a bit untrusting of them after my first job where HR were wrapped around managements fingers and I'm pretty certain told them about all the 'private' conversations we had.
    Unfortunately, because it's a grad scheme, and i'm one of many, the chances are that change would be impossible. The only jobs I could change to are accounts preps and tax but I'd actually prefer audit as it's relatively client facing!

    Anyways, as I said, I don't blame the company - it's my fault for taking it on before doing adequate research. On top of that, I have no regrets as I've come a long way in the 7 months i've been here.

    I suppose I'm just sick of people telling me what I can and can't do it life, when in my opinion life is for living and taking risks - as long as the risk doesn't take me out the job market for eternity!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Hey jordforce, i've got a few questions for you!

    I am starting a full time job with a local accountancy firm when I leave college (about a month and a half). It's an audit/accounts job and they will pay for my training towards AAT and ACA should I want to progress to that. I didn't want to go for the big 4 because I thought they would be too big and I may just get stuck in the job without being about to do much else. I'm hoping, being with a local firm (they are part of a group in the top 20 though), that I will get to experience different areas of the firm and get more of an all round knowledge.

    I'm not sure if an ACA training contract includes the AAT or if it's just the ACA, so you may not be able to answer some questions

    1. Do you improve professionally as a person? I'm pretty good at writing professional emails but when it comes to meeting new people and talking over the phone I am rubbish. Is this part of the training or do you just sort of pick it up?

    2. Does your salary increase as you progress through the training? My salary is quite low so i'm wondering if it is likely to increase, or if they will keep it low until I pass the exams?

    3. Do you find it difficult to balance work/life? My job is 8.5 hours a day, 5 days a week. (1 day will be study leave). How much 'study' do you have to do outside of work hours? Will I be working all week then having to go over what i've learnt at the weekend?

    Thanks!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey,

    1) Yes I've improved professionally. But barring a few presentations and pointless training exercises, you get this through real life experience. I haven't been on the phones yet, but I've good experience with clients now. As you progress (and you may do quicker) you'll get more hands on experience.

    But in my opinion, it's not necessarily particularly quick. You'll develop in any job where you have responsibility and experience. If you want to get better on phones, work in telesales for a bit. If you want to improve face to face, work in a restaurant. I don't mean do them literally but my point is you can improve soft skills anywhere - and an ACA training contract isn't particularly quick.

    2) Mine personally does but it depends on your firm. I have a whole structured plan for how much and what dates my salary increases. The increases are hardly mind blowing though. As you probably know, once you qualify you'd expect a big pay rise, either by moving or at your current firm.

    3) For me, personally, I normally get out of work at 5:30 and so my balance is probably the biggest perk of my job. Normally before exams, I won't go out for a couple of weeks beforehand to revise properly but generally it's good. Obviously it depends on the person - as I said, I have a natural knack for exams.

    Hope that all helps!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jordforce)
    Hey,

    1) Yes I've improved professionally. But barring a few presentations and pointless training exercises, you get this through real life experience. I haven't been on the phones yet, but I've good experience with clients now. As you progress (and you may do quicker) you'll get more hands on experience.

    But in my opinion, it's not necessarily particularly quick. You'll develop in any job where you have responsibility and experience. If you want to get better on phones, work in telesales for a bit. If you want to improve face to face, work in a restaurant. I don't mean do them literally but my point is you can improve soft skills anywhere - and an ACA training contract isn't particularly quick.

    2) Mine personally does but it depends on your firm. I have a whole structured plan for how much and what dates my salary increases. The increases are hardly mind blowing though. As you probably know, once you qualify you'd expect a big pay rise, either by moving or at your current firm.

    3) For me, personally, I normally get out of work at 5:30 and so my balance is probably the biggest perk of my job. Normally before exams, I won't go out for a couple of weeks beforehand to revise properly but generally it's good. Obviously it depends on the person - as I said, I have a natural knack for exams.

    Hope that all helps!
    hi there I have just started studying for the aca and I just wanted to know if you could Give me some advice with respect to my questions on the Threads I started. You seem to have easily pass The aca exams and I just wanted to know what your "secret" was because you seem to have quite a good technique.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I'm in pretty much the same boat except at the Big 4. I'm 8 months or so in and plan on leaving. I have exactly the same feelings about the job as you other than the fact my work life balance seems to be much worse, I can count the number of times I've finished at 5.30 on one hand...

    I've got a clear idea of what I want to do. I studied economics at uni and really want to go and work at the GES and put what I learned into practice, and actually come up with solutions to problems and use my brain as opposed to just ticking samples all day long...

    I've applied to the GES and am through to the EAC but have much revision to do in order to get through that...if I don't get the job I plan on doing an MSc in Economics and Public Policy and applying again, with more skills, and my knowledge much fresher in my mind.

    If I didn't have a plan I would probably stick the job out until I did have one as well as saving, but as I feel I have a clear goal, know I never want to be an accountant of any kind, and have got to the point where I almost dread work (the only motivating factor right now is I get to listen to music on the journey), I've decided there is little point in me staying.

    Like yourself I have learned a lot from a professional point of view, as well as how to deal with clients and difficult people, but it has also helped me realise exactly what I want to do and that there are more important things than money in life...
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by montyr)
    ...
    Hi Montyr, I'm just about to start as a audit trainee for ACA this September and I would like to give it my best shot to become ACA qualified before I make any decisions.

    I realise your at a Big4 right now and I have heard that arguably the Big4 gets the most interesting clients. From your post you have said that you find work dull as its just ticking boxes.

    Is that really all there is to being an audit trainee? I know the work is dull but is it hard/challenging or is it so easy to the point you fall asleep? For the firm I got an offer from (non Big4 top 10) they said I will face a variety of clients and everyday will be different.. is this true or do firms just make it sound better than it is and in fact you will pretty much be doing the same thing everyday for first 2-3 years?

    Finally I know you want to leave due to your reasons as an individual but do you know if any of your trainee friends feel the same way? So pretty much being an audit trainee is just a dull job that pays slightly better than others?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by novadragon849)
    Hi Montyr, I'm just about to start as a audit trainee for ACA this September and I would like to give it my best shot to become ACA qualified before I make any decisions.

    I realise your at a Big4 right now and I have heard that arguably the Big4 gets the most interesting clients. From your post you have said that you find work dull as its just ticking boxes.

    Is that really all there is to being an audit trainee? I know the work is dull but is it hard/challenging or is it so easy to the point you fall asleep? For the firm I got an offer from (non Big4 top 10) they said I will face a variety of clients and everyday will be different.. is this true or do firms just make it sound better than it is and in fact you will pretty much be doing the same thing everyday for first 2-3 years?

    Finally I know you want to leave due to your reasons as an individual but do you know if any of your trainee friends feel the same way? So pretty much being an audit trainee is just a dull job that pays slightly better than others?
    Honestly, firms make it sound better than it is imo, most days are the same, you might work on different clients, but at the end of the day but for minor differences from client to client an audit is an audit...

    I haven't spent all of my time ticking boxes, but a lot of audit is ticking boxes essentially. I have worked on quite a lot of different areas but after you've done an area once it becomes boring as you're just following what the audit methodology tells you essentially.

    The things I have spent most of my time doing:

    1)Walkthroughs and process notes which is essentially writing down step by step how, for example, a sale is processed from the sales order through to the payment, doing this gets exceptionally dull very quickly.

    2) Controls testing to come to a conclusion over whether or not the controls in place (such as FC approval for purchases over X amount) are operating efficiently, this generally involves testing a sample and ticking it through to come to a conclusion over whether that control is operating effectively. If there aren't control deficiencies then this will reduce your sample sizes at the next phase of the audit.

    3) Substantive testing. This involves a lot of samples, depending on the area you are looking after, and then ticking through these samples. Hassling the client to give you a listing of invoices etc. When they finally give that to you selecting a sample of them and then asking for the documentation to support that, and checking it to the original listing, again ticking. You might also have to reperform a lot of stuff, for example calculating a depreciation charge using a formula and comparing it to the depreciation charge (things like this are reasonably "fun" the first time you do it, if you choose to work it out yourself using common sense, but after that first time it's straightforward and dull...). The most interesting thing I have got to do is analytical review, which is pretty much looking at movements year on year in, for example, sales and then asking the client why that movement has occurred, and getting evidence for that, you might have to produce some graphs to identify peaks in sales or payroll, but once you have done this kind of thing once, again it becomes dull.

    Overall:

    Is the work challenging, imo not really, challenging to the extent that it gets stressful when the client doesn't supply the information you need until the last day of the audit and you have a mad rush to complete it.

    Is the work boring, when you first work on a new area mostly it is interesting purely because it can be fun trying to understand exactly why you are doing what you are doing, as well as working out how to do it. After this initial time it gets dull, and you will find yourself working on the same areas again and again, audit is very samey by nature imo, even when you get more senior you'll work on similar things on a day to day basis, with minor variations from client to client. I would say 80/90% of the time the work is dull. Plus in your first couple of years you will get given the crap jobs noone else wants (which is understandable as you have the cheapest charge out rate) and in my experience when it's busy you get told to tick through samples without even knowing what it offers to the audit as there isn't time to explain it, very frustrating...You won't be doing the same thing for 2-3 years, you will move onto auditing different areas, but the same principles apply, and within just over 2 years at the big 4 you will be leading your own audits, but this isn't all it's cracked upto be imo, you still have little influence on what actually goes on, it's just that your the person ultimately responsible for ensuring everything that the more senior staff want to be done gets done. I just see constraints on what we do everywhere and find it extremely frustrating.

    Another factor for me is that the majority of clients see auditors as a hinderance, our job is statutory and it is difficult to add any value whatsoever, especially when you are at the bottom of the rung...if you want to do a job where you feel your job is valued and you feel like you are contributing to something important then I wouldn't do auditing. If you're happy to learn regulations, and follow methodology, with little opportunity to question and little scope to question (particular compared to other work) then become an auditor...

    As far as other people in my intake. From speaking to others most people seem pretty disillusioned (one of them's dad was a partner) with the role, as far as I'm aware I'm the only person seriously considering quitting but I think that is just because I'm the only one who seriously knows what I want to do if I leave. I think some people enjoy it, but honestly have never heard someone at our level say that. Every year several people leave before the end of their first year, and that's not unusual at any big 4 firm
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by montyr)
    Like yourself I have learned a lot from a professional point of view, as well as how to deal with clients and difficult people, but it has also helped me realise exactly what I want to do and that there are more important things than money in life...
    This is what rings home the most for me. I don't know my exact path but I know any career in accountancy, and even potentially private finance, is going to be entirely unfulfilling and so i'm thinking of ways out. Chances are that i'll live abroad for a bit and travel but even if I move over to another industry and decide it's not for me, at least i've learnt new skills and gained new knowledge. Baby steps forward is better than standing still.

    Re: your money point. Hear hear. After being brought up with money, I find myself in an identity crisis where half of me wants to live in a mansion sipping champagne when i'm older and the other half wants to shun money and live in a monastery in Tibet. It's finding the right balance that is the difficult part and i'd imagine it's gonna take a lot of time and reflection.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Ex-graduate recruiter/HR Manager here. I read this bit
    where HR were wrapped around managements fingers
    - but listen before you hold that against me! The problem is that recruiters look at past performance as an indication of what your future performance will be. Occasionally, this isn’t a good indicator, but as a general rule, it is. What you will be telling recruiters if you quit is:

    You misjudged not one, but two careers. This may indicate to them poor judgement, poor planning and a lack of research

    Despite knowing that ACA is a very good qualification to have, you weren’t prepared to defer gratification for a further two and a half years to gain it. It doesn’t matter what else you go on to do, but it’s going to help your CV and help in any further role you have, whether you start your own company, or anything else.
    go travelling for a year independently which to me is a real education. Learn a language, read a truck load of literature, meet like (and not so like) minded people and learn through real experience
    – this is all fine – but it makes you look a bit dim not to have thought through this in advance
    As you'd expect my parents and the older generation aren't so supportive. Their paradigms and beliefs are different to mine. In their opinion, if I quit, no employer will EVER take another chance on me as I look like a quitter
    I wouldn’t say you will never work again, but it will be harder and the better employers won’t necessarily look at you, so your salary and future prospects may be affected.
    Everyone is so quick to shriek that an ACA opens so many doors and is a great way to a stable income but surely success is up here *points to brain* rather than in the letters after my name.
    Yes, maybe, but not really with two failed jobs behind you.
    Fine, go travelling, but could you go travelling after you have qualified? You could probably work as an interim and travel for years without raising too many eyebrows. If you have to quit, quit, but it will make things much easier for you if you don’t. Plus, you have done the hard bit - no-one claims the first year of ACA is exciting, but it can only improve from here.

    Would your firm consider giving you a year’s sabatical to go and travel before finishing off ACA (if your department is big enough to manage staffing). If you could present them with a suitable plan, and one that would give them good PR – they may (ie. If the news story was ‘Grant Thornton (or whoever) part-qualified takes sabbatical to work for VSO/raises £xK in sponsorship for x charity on world travels)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks for the response IA.

    I hear what you're saying with regard to two 'failed' jobs. Though I disagree with the term 'failed' - i'd only consider the first a failure. The second one, i'm getting along quite competently and I've learnt a lot - but my whole body squirms every time I hear the word balance sheet or reconciliation which to me is a clear sign to get out. But ok, you probably know better, so let's call it failed from the point of potential recruiters.

    Anywho, my first job only lasted 6 weeks and so can be omitted (adding things to CV may be morally wrong but omitting things?) from my CV resulting in only one failed job, rather than two, so less red flags. I could fill in the gaps quite easily i'd imagine. If I stay in finance, surely I could spin up a good story about getting a broad experience and training with a good company but now I've gained enough 'expertise' and experience to move on etc etc.

    Re: the ACA being a great qualification - surely that only applies to jobs in finance? My problem is is that I don't even know if I want a job in finance at all, i'm even considering teaching which to me is potentially far more fulfilling, so do I stick or twist? I'm confused. Should I be leaving without a concrete plan? Is it worse to stay in a job I hate - surely i'm just delaying time where I could be finding my rightful place? I'm thinking I need something more creative - will an ACA help me there?

    Thanks for the message and i'd appreciate some more advice if it's going!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Also, I know this isn't your fault (obviously) and you're just talking from the point of view of an employer but I find it increasingly harsh that we're expecting to know exactly what we want to do straight out of university. You call me 'dim' (very tactful way of putting it!) for not thinking in advance, but maybe I didn't want to go until now? It frustrates me that that is an issue for employers.

    In an idea world, all university leavers will know their life's path, but that just isn't in touch with the reality at all. Unfortunately it leads to a lot of unhappiness for people who feel trapped in the wrong choices they made.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ::
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: June 14, 2013
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    Guide to finance and bankingGuide to accountancy

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    ICAEW logo

    ICAEW

    "Choose a career journey with limitless possibilities."

    Quick link:

    Unanswered finance and accountancy threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.