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    Hey everyone

    Thought that I might as well create a revision thread for this exam since I haven’t seen one yet.

    So yeah, this is for everyone that is taking the ‘Texts In Context’ exam paper (17th May 2013); covering all three options:

    Option A: Victorian Literature
    Option B: World War One Literature
    Option C: The Struggle for Identity in Modern Literature

    Assessment Objectives:

    AO1: Articulate creative, informed and relevant responses to literary texts, using appropriate terminology and concepts, and coherent, accurate written expression

    AO2: Demonstrate detailed critical understanding in analysing the ways in which form, structure and language shape meanings in literary texts

    AO3: Explore connections and comparisons between different literary texts, informed by interpretations of other readers

    AO4: Demonstrate understanding of the significance and influence of the contexts in which literary texts are written and received


    Section A: Contextual Linking
    Spoiler:
    Show
    You should spend one hour on the contextual linking question for Section A. Timing for this question: 10 - 15 minutes: reading, annotating, planning, 20 - 25 minutes on each bullet point.

    HOWEVER more confident students might decide to integrate their responses in which the extract and the wider reading comparisons are interwoven throughout the answer.

    The good thing is that the actual question will always be EXACTLY the same. Of course the non-fiction extract will change each time. The Question:
    • How does the writer present his thoughts and feelings about the struggle for identity?(20 - 25 minutes)
    •How far is the extract similar to and different from your wider reading about the struggle for identity in modern literature? You should consider the writer's choices of form, structure and language. (20 - 25 minutes)

    Total (45 marks)

    ANALYSING THE QUESTION

    As I said, the wording of the contextual linking question is always the same -only the extract changes. The first instruction is "Read the following extract carefully." Use a highlighter pen to annotate key features of the extract and read actively for meaning from the start. The extract will always be introduced with some back ground information and you must pay careful attention to this. It is designed to steer you in the right direction with regard to the writer's overarching concerns. The extracts have been chosen to highlight thoughts and feelings 'typical' of the context that you have been studying.

    PLANNING THE ANSWER

    As you read the extract focus on tracing the writer's point of view. This is not always the same as the characters in the extract. Look for any noticeable features of form, structure and language. If you can, try to bear in mind the second bullet point about relevant wider reading texts you might like to include in your answer. If you plan key areas of comparison and contrast, you will be more likely to produce methodical and well-organised responses. Also you will be less likely to start with:
    “In this essay I am going to write about...” (YUK!) This tells the examiner nothing more than your pen is working.

    I know we've moved on from GCSE, but you should still remember that PEEL format of analysis:
    • Make a clear POINT
    • Give relevant supporting EVIDENCE (short embedded quotation and/or reference)
    • Finish with a clear EXPLANATION (analyse what this reveals)
    • LINK your ideas to the question.

    FORM STRUCTURE AND LANGUAGE

    The only way to get into the higher mark bands is to compare and contrast the texts in terms of form, structure and language (the way they are written) as well as content (the writer's thoughts and feelings).
    Show the examiner that you are building a well -structured argument and writing a cohesive argument in which all your paragraphs and ideas are linked and well developed. Use carefully chosen connectives:
    • Furthermore
    • Moreover
    • Likewise
    • in addition
    • besides
    • additionally
    • also
    These words indicate a train of thought and give the impression of a developing argument.

    Language of COMPARISON

    • Connectives such as: similarly, likewise, correspondingly, in the same way, and equally suggest similarity, but here are some other basic writing frames you might use:
    • To underline the link between these texts, I would argue that...
    • What unites these two texts is...
    • A fundamental point of connection between the texts is...
    • These texts are connected in that...
    • These texts parallel each other in their focus upon...
    • The texts resemble each other in their responses to...

    Language of CONTRAST

    Connectives such as on the contrary, whereas, then again, on the other hand, in contrast, quite the reverse and contrastingly indicate difference.

    Other useful ways of differentiating texts are:
    • To draw a distinction between these texts I would argue that...
    • What separates these two texts is...
    • The texts diverge in that...
    • The texts differ because....
    • The texts are differentiated in that whereas...
    • A key difference of opinion between the writers exists in their attitude to...

    HOW TO LINK BETWEEN TEXTS

    You could start with a typicality of theme e.g. women's roles and their treatment if that is what the extract contains. Then go on to refer to other wider reading texts which also tap into this area of the struggle for identity. Once you have developed a response to the typicality of theme, and mapped out some similarities and differences in treatment, you need to manage a transition into other aspects of the struggle for identity. Don't get stuck on women or one single aspect of the struggle for identity. Having traced where some broadly similar themes have emerged through wider reading, you must move on to map some key thematic differences. Like this!

    The writer's primary concern in this extract is women's roles and their treatment, but an equally important aspect of the struggle for identity in modern literature is sexual identity which is not mentioned in this extract...Or Moving on from the subject of women, another key aspect of the struggle for identity in modern literature which has emerged from my wider reading is the tensions between races. One writer who was very concerned with this issue was ... Maya Angelou/ Toni Morrison…Or This writer is primarily interested in oppression of youth, whereas in Toni Morrison is more concerned with the oppression of race...DON'T PANIC!

    It is unlikely that you won't be able to find something in the extract which is similar to your wider reading, but if that should happen and your mind goes blank, don't panic and move on to another area of your context (e.g. struggle for identity) straight away!

    Assessment Objectives in Section A:

    AO1: 3 marks
    AO2: 12 marks
    AO3: 3 marks
    AO4: 27 marks



    Section B: Poetry

    Usually, one of the two available will question you on a specific poem and how it’s key to the collection. The second question would usually be an outrageous statement asking you to use the collection widely to produce an illuminating response. Below is the possible structure which you can adopt for this section. YOU DO NOT NEED TO FOLLOW THIS!

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Paragraph 1: Address key terms for the question and begin to answer it- use evidence from a poem and analyse it, but keep focus on the question and make sure you’re responding to it clearly.

    Paragraph 2: Key poem 1

    • Choose a poem that agrees or disagrees most clearly with the statement in the question
    • Discuss at least one poetic device
    • Quote and analyse, in your analysis refer back to the question
    • Discuss one or preferably more reasons for the writing of the poem (the writer’s purpose)


    Paragraph 3: Key poem 2

    • Choose a poem that disagrees with the statement from the question and suggest a different purpose the poet may have had from the one implied in the question
    • Contrast the imagery used to that in Key poem 1. Explain in some important ways in which the poems are different from that of Key Poem 1, or disagrees with the statement
    • Discuss the poetic form. How does the line length, rhymes (internal and external) and the vocabulary support or not support the question?


    Paragraph 4:

    • Relax your focus and return to discussing the question a bit more. Can you relate the question to the purpose of the collection?
    • Revisit your favourite memorised quotations; how can these be related to the question? Consider irony and humour in the poems. What is the purpose of the poet doing this? Can we discuss irony and humour in relation to the question?


    Paragraph 5: Key Poem 3

    • Try to analyse this with a view to achieve two things:
    1) A real focus on form and structure- why is it in that order (structure)? Why does the poet use poetic techniques- what do they convey? What can we say about how a character is presented?
    2) A focus on the poets key messages in your chosen poets.
    What principles is the poet presenting as a key to their chosen theme (e.g. female experience)?
    Can we begin to explain and explore these principles and assert them as more important as more important than the question?

    Conclusion:
    • Agree AND disagree with the statement (AO3)- assert what important principles the poet shows through your chosen poems and relate these to your question.
    • Do they agree with it? Is there something important the poet does which the question ‘misses’?


    Assessment Objectives (for this section):
    AO1= 15 marks
    AO2=15 marks
    AO3=15 marks


    Revision tips!

    Spoiler:
    Show
    1) Reading, re-reading, and re-reading again!
    Make sure that you know all your texts inside out. There is nothing worse than hurriedly searching for a quote in the middle of the exam with the time against your side!

    2) Time management
    - Be realistic: don’t overestimate how much you can get through in a given time. Better start early!
    - Make sure that you give necessary attention to every text that you’ve studied. Don’t take the ‘I know that well enough so I needn’t revise it’ approach.
    - Aim for a variety of revision tasks
    - Take breaks between your revision!

    3) Past paper and specimen paper questions
    Try to look and do past papers as much as you can! It will harness your exam technique to perfection

    4) Timed essays
    The more you practice writing essays under strict time conditions (like in the actual exam), the quicker you’ll get. Make sure that you stick to the Assessment Objectives like glue and that your answer the question DIRECTLY. Any waffling of irrelevant information isn’t only wasting your time, but it isn’t fetching you extra marks either.

    5) Essay planning
    This should form a key part of your revision process. Planned essays tend to display organisation and cogency of ideas, whereas unplanned essays show a lack of these. So make sure that you get used to making concise plans.

    6) Writing your essay
    Always begin your essay addressing the question directly. Then introduce your arguments to either support/challenge the statement posed. Conclusion should be a final summary of your ideas.


    I hope that this has been some form of help to those who are struggling with revision, and if anyone else has more advice/tips, feel free to advocate them so that I can add them on here for everyone to see
    Good luck to everyone!
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    thank you for this!!!
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    This is really helpful! Is it okay if I print out the guidance for my revision folder?
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    (Original post by sarsoora)
    thank you for this!!!
    Your welcome

    (Original post by OliviaBara)
    This is really helpful! Is it okay if I print out the guidance for my revision folder?
    Yeah yeah sure go ahead

    Oh and a question for the both of you! do you know how to structure the answers to Section A? I am soooo stuck Thanks
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    (Original post by justanotherindigo)
    Your welcome



    Yeah yeah sure go ahead

    Oh and a question for the both of you! do you know how to structure the answers to Section A? I am soooo stuck Thanks
    hopefully I can help you!

    I've learnt that we should base our points around AO2, so the extracts language structure and form. And then we can bring in the rest of the AO's

    Id start my points talking about the extracts language, structure and form since AO2 has the most marks after context! Then with each AO2 point (especially language as thats probably the easiest to talk about out of the three!) add in some references to context.. if the language has an informal angry tone to it for example, you could bring in why, like the authors past experiences or politics for instance, may have made the author angry and their language may reflect that. basically the authors identity reflects in the extracts language, structure and form

    so, AO2 and AO4 could be woven in together, whilst using AO1 (terminology and creative and informed responses), and also making comparisons to your wider reading.

    It may look daunting haha as right now it probably looks like this structure of answering the question will look like one fat paragraph haha. but with practice its really simple!
    just think in each paragraph you could make a point about the extracts AO2's whilst also including the rest of the AO's! so each point can be one paragraph.

    if theres nothing you can say about your wider reading with a point you've made then link the wider reading with context! after saying what you can about the AO2's then swiftly move on to context and compare then!

    i guess theres no correct structure to answering this part of the exam since it depends how we perceive the extract that will appear, just remember: base your points and 'creative and informed responses' around lang, structure and form, linking them to as much context as possible, and if any of your points can be referenced to your wider reading then put them down.. all whilst using your appropriate terminlogy!

    its honestly not as complicated and scary as ive put it, haha hopefully you'll understand what I'm trying to say!
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    (Original post by sarsoora)
    hopefully I can help you!

    I've learnt that we should base our points around AO2, so the extracts language structure and form. And then we can bring in the rest of the AO's

    Id start my points talking about the extracts language, structure and form since AO2 has the most marks after context! Then with each AO2 point (especially language as thats probably the easiest to talk about out of the three!) add in some references to context.. if the language has an informal angry tone to it for example, you could bring in why, like the authors past experiences or politics for instance, may have made the author angry and their language may reflect that. basically the authors identity reflects in the extracts language, structure and form

    so, AO2 and AO4 could be woven in together, whilst using AO1 (terminology and creative and informed responses), and also making comparisons to your wider reading.

    It may look daunting haha as right now it probably looks like this structure of answering the question will look like one fat paragraph haha. but with practice its really simple!
    just think in each paragraph you could make a point about the extracts AO2's whilst also including the rest of the AO's! so each point can be one paragraph.

    if theres nothing you can say about your wider reading with a point you've made then link the wider reading with context! after saying what you can about the AO2's then swiftly move on to context and compare then!

    i guess theres no correct structure to answering this part of the exam since it depends how we perceive the extract that will appear, just remember: base your points and 'creative and informed responses' around lang, structure and form, linking them to as much context as possible, and if any of your points can be referenced to your wider reading then put them down.. all whilst using your appropriate terminlogy!

    its honestly not as complicated and scary as ive put it, haha hopefully you'll understand what I'm trying to say!
    Ah thank you sooo much honestly that was great help! The problem is, I have a rubbish English teacher so I need all the help I can...I really want to ace this exam! Have you got any resources by any chance? Like model answers...I can't even do a past paper I tried but I haven't really got anywhere. There is only a month left till exams and I'm sooooo worried :/ If I can see a model answer, then I would know how to structure my answer, but AQA are so stingy.
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    Have anyone of you read July's people, Breakfast on Pluto, Dancing at Lughnasa, Things Fall Apart?
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    (Original post by justanotherindigo)
    Ah thank you sooo much honestly that was great help! The problem is, I have a rubbish English teacher so I need all the help I can...I really want to ace this exam! Have you got any resources by any chance? Like model answers...I can't even do a past paper I tried but I haven't really got anywhere. There is only a month left till exams and I'm sooooo worried :/ If I can see a model answer, then I would know how to structure my answer, but AQA are so stingy.
    no problem glad it helped you!
    as for resources i havent found any online yet my teacher photocopied some top band answers and honestly they werent as complicated and sophisticated as you'd expect - i promise you! anyone is capable of writing to their "standards" haha even my teacher said it wasnt that difficult! their structure was based around the extracts AO2 as i was saying before, and in basic 5-6 lined paragraphs - defo not scary TRUST me
    so dont panic and stay as calm as possible! as long as you know your wider reading, some keywords, how to talk about AO2, add some context you'll be as good as anyone else! (this is coming from someone who was getting 15/45 in practice essays a few months ago!)
    for revision my teacher has told us to summarize our wider reading in terms of themes, key quotes etc.. and link them all back to identity! hopefully that can help you too!
    i hope your panic will subside as honestly, it will be okay! we still have plenty of time if we use it wisely so dont worry
    please let me know if you need anything else ill be more than happy to help you!

    oh and if i do find any resources i will defo let you know!
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    Just realised that it's the same essay plan as in the activity pack haha, oh well it looks so much better with the colours!
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    (Original post by sarsoora)
    no problem glad it helped you!
    as for resources i havent found any online yet my teacher photocopied some top band answers and honestly they werent as complicated and sophisticated as you'd expect - i promise you! anyone is capable of writing to their "standards" haha even my teacher said it wasnt that difficult! their structure was based around the extracts AO2 as i was saying before, and in basic 5-6 lined paragraphs - defo not scary TRUST me
    so dont panic and stay as calm as possible! as long as you know your wider reading, some keywords, how to talk about AO2, add some context you'll be as good as anyone else! (this is coming from someone who was getting 15/45 in practice essays a few months ago!)
    for revision my teacher has told us to summarize our wider reading in terms of themes, key quotes etc.. and link them all back to identity! hopefully that can help you too!
    i hope your panic will subside as honestly, it will be okay! we still have plenty of time if we use it wisely so dont worry
    please let me know if you need anything else ill be more than happy to help you!

    oh and if i do find any resources i will defo let you know!
    Aha, I've done some past papers based on this! I gave it to my teacher and she said that they were good but I need to work on my sentence structure Thank you!


    (Original post by OliviaBara)
    Just realised that it's the same essay plan as in the activity pack haha, oh well it looks so much better with the colours!
    Yeah it is! And I've also deleted the thread as you've requested!

    Does anyone know the message of The Virgin's Memo in Feminine Gospels? I'm soo stuck :/
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    (Original post by justanotherindigo)
    Aha, I've done some past papers based on this! I gave it to my teacher and she said that they were good but I need to work on my sentence structure Thank you!




    Yeah it is! And I've also deleted the thread as you've requested!

    Does anyone know the message of The Virgin's Memo in Feminine Gospels? I'm soo stuck :/
    same! i was thinking how typically a mother is always thinking/worrying about her child all the time, maybe suggesting their way of thinking? i dno haha some poems of hers are so weird to translate!
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    Hi guys, I was wondering if you could help me please with my question It is regarding question 1 of the exam for the struggle for identity? I just can't find anything at all to analyse!
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    (Original post by muffin_selight)
    Hi guys, I was wondering if you could help me please with my question It is regarding question 1 of the exam for the struggle for identity? I just can't find anything at all to analyse!
    i will try help you with that tomorrow afternoon!
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    (Original post by sarsoora)
    i will try help you with that tomorrow afternoon!
    Thanks, I was wondering if you have come up with anything yet? I have to write it for Thursday...:confused:
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    Hi there, i was wondering if anyone could help me on how to analyze the form of the extract, for example a novel with a linear structure.
    I understand how it is relevant for things such as speeches but i am stuck on things which have a seemingly normal form.

    Also, would i lose out on marks if i were to only discuss form through the wider reading texts and not on the actual unseen extract?
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    Is anyone doing the war poetry option? Im struggeling on analysing May Wedderburn Cannan's "Rouen" and google is really not throwing me anything good
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    Hi guys is anyone doing the struggle for identity synoptic question?
    If so, can you share book summaries or a few books/poems/plays you'd advise me to research before the exam?
    Thank you


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    I have done the plays; (general summary of some themes - you will need to read these or find out more)

    Struggles and the mind:
    Journey's End (The Struggle with how people see your identity and how you've changed (mainly WW1 experience that affect people's lives) R.C Sheriff
    A Street Car Named Desire (Desires + Madness - trying to create a new identity because you cannot cope with your past)

    Class:
    Top Girls (Gender : Women rising to the 'Top') Caryl Churchill
    An Inspector Calls (Class: socialist responsibility for other people and wealth) J.B Priestly

    These are the books I have done;

    The Curious Incident of The Dog in The Night-time (Asperger syndrome (disability struggle) Mark Haddon

    Of Mice and Men (Crooks - Racism and internal worsening of the struggle to be around people who he think will judge him) - ''Why if I say somethin', it's just a ****** sayin' it'' + You got no rights comin' in a colored man's room. You got no rights messing around in here at all.'' John Steinbeck

    The Handmaid's Tale (Loss of identity - ''Handmaid's'', ''Wives'' and ''Marthas'' - new names to group the women (neologisms - new created words by the state in the book) Dystopian future novel. Opression by the state on the people. Margaret Atwood

    The Colour Purple (Coming of age genre (Bildungsroman) + structural change of language (bad grammar to worse throughout the novel) that represents or is even in parallel the development and self-determination of the character as they manage to progress and achieve their aims) - ''Albert: Who you think you is? You can curse nobody. Look at you. Your black, you're poor, you're ugly, you're a woman, you're nothing at all!'' ---> "I’m poor, black. I may even be ugly. But dear God, I’m here!" <-- Self Determination and resistance to Albert. Alice Walker

    Poems:

    Refugee Blues ( The outsider - Discrimination)
    Funeral Blues ( Sexuality - homosexuality)
    W.H Auden

    I haven't done a lot of poetry and some other things I have read but not studied in detail are;
    -Life of Pi (Yann Martel)
    -Mrs Dalloway (Virginia Woolf)
    -The Diary of a Young Girl (Anne Frank)
    -Cloud Atlas (David Mitchell - really good for structural technique as it is set in 6 different places and times and represents many themes such as the reoccurance of slavery throughout each chapter although the times have changed you can still be a 'slave' to your boss for example)
    -The Lovely Bones (explores death, not sure how I could link to the struggle for identity however it mentions rape so that could be an issue that someone will have to deal with after) - Alice Sebold
    -Affinity (explores lesbians in the victorian era (different attitudes than now) but also a crime/mystery novel) - Sarah Waters

    -
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    Oh and a very good novel to read is ''Oranges are Not The Only Fruit'' by Jeanette Winterson. I read it in a day and it is quite easy to follow.
    Themes:
    -conflict of your beliefs and your sexuality (christian and a lesbian)
    - Finding 'yourself' (finding your identity) (adopted and had a lot of influence from mother and her beliefs so she needed to figure out what she wanted)
    -Disownment - ‘You’ll have to leave,’ she said. ‘I’m not havin’ demons here.’ (Jeanette's mother)
    Disownment could be from the church or the society so this can relate to other novels where someone is considered different from the mainstream or the 'ideal' or acceptable person in that society and are discriminated - e.g Anne Frank had to hide for most of her teenage years because she was considered to be a nuisance and a waste of space to the Nazi Germans.
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    (Original post by muffin_selight)
    Thanks, I was wondering if you have come up with anything yet? I have to write it for Thursday...:confused:
    Context:
    Think about how the attitudes of people in both times may have changed.
    This can be our time (how you interpret it, and how you receive the text in your time (2013))
    It can be how the writer has been influenced to write about the 1940s and 50s in 2001, maybe they are writing objectively about the past and how they might view the issues/themes, struggles and subject matter differently to the mentioned time.
    It can also be the times of other books written that you know (wider reading) and how these books reflect different or similar attitudes, themes or struggles considering the time it was written or set. (Both are important because of the perspective of the people at the time!!!)

    (2001) - Think about the attitudes of the people at that time, how do they differ from the 1940s and 1950s and how would they react then and now to the idea of women having babies out of wedlock? Do you think that people would react differently then to they would now and does this happen more now and is more accepted?

    Why would the attitudes of the grandmother be different from the mother?


    Techniques:
    Language
    Structure
    Form


    Language - 'Maggies' is a label and this reflects the struggle the women had to maintain their own identity although they were being called this. (Links to Handmaid's Tale - ''Hand maids'')

    Emotive language - ''they get no pay for the work they do'' - suggests that the grandmother feels sorry for them and this is maintained throughout her dialogue.
    ''Poor unfortunate mothers'' - Mother

    links to...[/B]

    Structure - two different perspectives on the same subject (mother and grandmother) shows that people view other people's identities in different ways and this can have a big affect as someone people outwardly or passively feel sorry for the maggies whereas others may not.
    Also reflects the curiosity that Bill had to learn about issues in his society.


    Form - Autobiographical account.
    Personal.
    Can say how this differs from your wider reading e.g other forms techniques such as the ones used in drama/play, poems and novels.

    Bit of info:
    A literary genre is a category of literary composition. Genres may be determined by literary technique, tone, content, or even (as in the case of fiction) length. --> Links to structure.

    Genre should not be confused with age category, by which literature may be classified as either adult, young-adult, or children's. They also must not be confused with format, such as graphic novel or picture book. The distinctions between genres and categories are flexible and loosely defined, often with subgroups.

    The most general genres in literature are (in loose chronological order) epic, tragedy,comedy, novel, short story, and creative nonfiction.

    They can all be in the genres prose or poetry, which shows best how loosely genres are defined. Additionally, a genre such as satire, allegory or pastoral might appear in any of the above, not only as a sub-genre,but as a mixture of genres.
 
 
 
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