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    I'm having a bit of difficulty knowing how to pronounce some words.

    Example:

    We pronounce the i in cinnamon as e
    We pronounce the i in trifle as i

    How do you guess the pronunciation of a unfamiliar word? I'm a foreign and get quite annoyed when I pronounce wrongly a word
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    It's difficult in English I'm afraid. We don't have consistent pronunciation rules, which is what makes the language so hard to learn. Most good dictionaries have a pronunciation guide, but perhaps the easiest way if you are speaking in front of English people is just to ask people to correct you if you say things wrong.

    If it's any comfort, even English people say things wrong sometimes. The first time I said the word "epitome" out loud I pronounced it ep-e-tome. (It should have been ep-it-oh-me.)
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    (Original post by destination unknown)
    I'm having a bit of difficulty knowing how to pronounce some words.

    Example:

    We pronounce the i in cinnamon as e
    We pronounce the i in trifle as i

    How do you guess the pronunciation of a unfamiliar word? I'm a foreign and get quite annoyed when I pronounce wrongly a word
    I pronounce the i in cinnamon as i. In the same way it's pronounced in "him". I pronounce the i in trifle the same as the word "eye". Is that what you mean?

    In the case you've described, the double letters can be a clue. For example the i in "riding" is like the i in trifle, but the i in "ridding" is like the i in cinnamon.

    But really there are no clear rules. You just have to hear the word said out loud.

    Funnily enough I was discussing this today at work. One strange example is "wind" as in "the wind is blowing" and "wind" as in "I have a wind up radio". Spelt the same, but they have different meanings and different pronunciations. There's simply no way you can know that unless someone tells you.

    edit - Doh! I got "riding" and "ridding" the wrong way round the first time. Sorted now. Sorry if you saw it before the edit and got even more confused
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    I pronounce the i in cinnamon as i. In the same way it's pronounced in "him". I pronounce the i in trifle the same as the word "eye". Is that what you mean?

    In the case you've described, the double letters can be a clue. For example the i in "riding" is like the i in trifle, but the i in "ridding" is like the i in cinnamon.

    But really there are no clear rules. You just have to hear the word said out loud.

    Funnily enough I was discussing this today at work. One strange example is "wind" as in "the wind is blowing" and "wind" as in "I have a wind up radio". Spelt the same, but they have different meanings and different pronunciations. There's simply no way you can know that unless someone tells you.

    edit - Doh! I got "riding" and "ridding" the wrong way round the first time. Sorted now. Sorry if you saw it before the edit and got even more confused
    Thanks for your input, I guess mistakes are part of life
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    (Original post by destination unknown)
    I'm having a bit of difficulty knowing how to pronounce some words.

    Example:

    We pronounce the i in cinnamon as e
    We pronounce the i in trifle as i

    How do you guess the pronunciation of a unfamiliar word? I'm a foreign and get quite annoyed when I pronounce wrongly a word
    I don't know exactly what the rules are, but off the top of my head, I seem to recall this being a helpful guide (which I think holds true!).

    If you've got double consonants (e.g. "nn" in "cinnamon"), the vowel before it is a short sound. An "e" at the end of a word generally seems to make the middle vowels (e.g. "i") longer.

    Let's take a few examples.

    Double consonant "rule"
    • Swimming
    • Adding
    • Hobbling (no idea where that came from!)


    "e" rule
    • Pine
    • Bone
    • Tame


    Hope this helps!
 
 
 
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