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    I'm relatively new to photography, but, I've been checking out the specs of this camera and it seems brilliant, but before I'd buy it (I still have a lot of saving to do) I'd really like some advice, maybe from people who have used or have the camera who can tell me what it's like. Or we could just discussmirrorless interchangeable lens cameras vs DSLRs??

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    I haven't used it, and it's really not my thing. I could understand buying it for a casual camera (especially with the pancake lens), but it seems a bit costly for that. I'd rather just get a standard point and shoot for those sorts of shots.

    My major concern is its small size, especially with large lenses. Weight, and importantly, the distribution of it, are quite vital. I have a battery grip on my DSLR and it's more useful as a counterbalance than as a method of doubling my battery life. I've seen pictures of people putting the 70-200 f/2.8 on it, and I can't imagine the camera would be in any way useful with that on there.

    Similarly, lenses aren't small either. There comes a limit where the size of the body of the camera, in proportion to the size of the lenses in your bag, means that a larger camera is a sensible option. I wouldn't use it to save space.


    If I had to spend that money on a non-DSLR, I'd highly consider the Canon Powershot G15 instead. I would have to do more research either way.
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    (Original post by SillyEddy)
    I haven't used it, and it's really not my thing. I could understand buying it for a casual camera (especially with the pancake lens), but it seems a bit costly for that. I'd rather just get a standard point and shoot for those sorts of shots.

    My major concern is its small size, especially with large lenses. Weight, and importantly, the distribution of it, are quite vital. I have a battery grip on my DSLR and it's more useful as a counterbalance than as a method of doubling my battery life. I've seen pictures of people putting the 70-200 f/2.8 on it, and I can't imagine the camera would be in any way useful with that on there.

    Similarly, lenses aren't small either. There comes a limit where the size of the body of the camera, in proportion to the size of the lenses in your bag, means that a larger camera is a sensible option. I wouldn't use it to save space.


    If I had to spend that money on a non-DSLR, I'd highly consider the Canon Powershot G15 instead. I would have to do more research either way.

    Thank you so much for all your help, and I'm looking at the Canon Powershot G15 now. I don't suppose you happen to know how beginner friendly it is? Like I said, I'm relatively new to photography, so wouldn't want a camera with loads of brilliant features that I can't work out hwo to use!
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    (Original post by Cat1095)
    Thank you so much for all your help, and I'm looking at the Canon Powershot G15 now. I don't suppose you happen to know how beginner friendly it is? Like I said, I'm relatively new to photography, so wouldn't want a camera with loads of brilliant features that I can't work out hwo to use!
    I haven't used the G15, but don't get me wrong... If I had to spend that money on a new camera, it would be something like the G15 over the EOS M. There are a lot of other options to consider.

    Things like the Canon IXUS range of cameras, for instance, would offer enough for a beginner as well as the capability to expand from there. The thing about the G15, I would assume, is that the manual mode features are better placed on the housing - The IXUS ones will probably have the settings a little more hidden. On my DSLR, I can access all the functions from a single button press... They all have dedicated buttons, so there's no need to faff around in the settings.


    What sort of photography would you like to get into? I do love the DSLR range, but it's not for everyone. If you need portability and certain features, there is probably something there for you. If you're looking to step it up a notch, you'll want to check that the camera can take "RAW" images - It's a specific file type (like .jpeg is) but it contains a lot more image information and makes it possible to edit the photos far more than a .jpeg would. Quite a few point and shoots are offering this now, but it is a memory intensive task (2MB photo might occupy more like 10MB with RAW).
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    Just get a proper DSLR like the 650D or the cheaper 600d, and spend money on the glass lenses. Do not buy a camera without a mirror.
 
 
 
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