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    In Canada, BC, our high schools teach up to grade 12 (17-18 years old). Physics, Biology, and Chemistry are taught as their own courses starting in grade 11; Literature, History, and sometimes Law starting in grade 12; and Math, English, and Social Studies mandatory up to grade 10/11. Lots of schools have programs other than these of course, especially my current one.

    Is any of that markedly different from British schooling?

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    They're called secondary schools and you know it, don't put it in quotation marks.
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    You want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_England

    But yes we call them secondary schools and never "high schools". High schools says to me; High School musical or American cheerleaders in a corridor without a 'hall pass', whatever that might be.
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    British secondary schools teach from year 7 (11-12) to year 11 (15-16). English, maths and science are mandatory throughout, often with religious studies and IT. History, geography, art, music, drama, sport, a language and design and technology are normally mandatory until year 9 at which point people will normally carry on about 4 of them until year 11 when GCSE exams are taken. Sixth form colleges then teach the next two years of education, generally allowing students to do 3-6 subjects at A level, although some offer other courses such as more vocational BTECs or the different IB exam system. Quite a lot of secondary schools have a sixth form attached. Education post 16 used to be optional, but the leaving age is now being raised to 18.
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    (Original post by cognito_08)
    You want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_England

    But yes we call them secondary schools and never "high schools". High schools says to me; High School musical or American cheerleaders in a corridor without a 'hall pass', whatever that might be.
    Not strictly correct in all cases - I can think of several schools near me called X High School
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    (Original post by thegodofgod)
    Not strictly correct in all cases - I can think of several schools near me called X High School
    Oh, I stand corrected!

    Maybe naming varies by local authority... ?
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    (Original post by cognito_08)
    Oh, I stand corrected!

    Maybe naming varies by local authority... ?
    By 'several', I meant just one

    But possibly :yes:
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    (Original post by jay_tee)
    In Canada, BC, our high schools teach up to grade 12 (17-18 years old). Physics, Biology, and Chemistry are taught as their own courses starting in grade 11; Literature, History, and sometimes Law starting in grade 12; and Math, English, and Social Studies mandatory up to grade 10/11. Lots of schools have programs other than these of course, especially my current one.

    Is any of that markedly different from British schooling?
    Since you don't specify where in Britain, I figure I should point out that the Scottish system is different, just in case
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Scotland

    (PS, where I'm from at least, we call them high school and secondary interchangeably :p:)
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    (Original post by cognito_08)
    You want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_England

    But yes we call them secondary schools and never "high schools". High schools says to me; High School musical or American cheerleaders in a corridor without a 'hall pass', whatever that might be.
    my school is over a hundred years old and its called "devonport high school for boys"
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    (Original post by SleepySheep)
    They're called secondary schools and you know it, don't put it in quotation marks.
    Well I couldn't be sure but I had a pretty good hunch. Thanks for clarifying that for me though.

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    (Original post by cognito_08)
    You want to look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_England

    But yes we call them secondary schools and never "high schools". High schools says to me; High School musical or American cheerleaders in a corridor without a 'hall pass', whatever that might be.
    In Canada the two titles are somewhat interchangeable, probably thanks to our neighbours down south. Not to say I have anything against the States--quite the contrary actually! They sell dairy for a steal compared to our Canadian stores, but I digress. Thank you for the link and the common sense (which I lacked) to pull up a Wiki page.

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    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    British secondary schools teach from year 7 (11-12) to year 11 (15-16). English, maths and science are mandatory throughout, often with religious studies and IT. History, geography, art, music, drama, sport, a language and design and technology are normally mandatory until year 9 at which point people will normally carry on about 4 of them until year 11 when GCSE exams are taken. Sixth form colleges then teach the next two years of education, generally allowing students to do 3-6 subjects at A level, although some offer other courses such as more vocational BTECs or the different IB exam system. Quite a lot of secondary schools have a sixth form attached. Education post 16 used to be optional, but the leaving age is now being raised to 18.
    You are lovely, this is exactly what I wanted to learn about! Thanks

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    My school was called X High School before I went or until partway through my time there. It only changed to accommodate specialist technology status, and became X High Technology College. It's something different now since it got performing arts status as well.
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    (Original post by munchkins)
    Since you don't specify where in Britain, I figure I should point out that the Scottish system is different, just in case
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_Scotland

    (PS, where I'm from at least, we call them high school and secondary interchangeably :p:)
    If it's interchangeable for you as well I suppose I shouldn't be so quick to accredit our tendancy to call them high schools to the States. Naughty me

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    It would appear upon further investigation that it differs depending on your area.

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    (Original post by cognito_08)
    Oh, I stand corrected!

    Maybe naming varies by local authority... ?
    Could be. My school was called a High School, and has had variations of that in the name since 1908. I was thinking it was a grammar school thing, but then I remembered a comprehensive high school near me as well.
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    (Original post by theciz)
    Could be. My school was called a High School, and has had variations of that in the name since 1908. I was thinking it was a grammar school thing, but then I remembered a comprehensive high school near me as well.
    Yeah the school I'm talking about was always a comprehensive, not a grammar school.
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    I went to secondary school but it was just called George tomlinsons school


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    My secondary school doesn't have "high school" or "secondary school" in its name at all.
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    (Original post by Lorna17)
    I went to secondary school but it was just called George tomlinsons school


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    That doesn't seem unheard of.


    (Original post by TheGoonerGirl)
    My secondary school doesn't have "high school" or "secondary school" in its name at all.
 
 
 
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