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    So it seems a bit shocking that i dont understand this at this point but i am really confused with oxidation and reduction reactions when it talks about hydrogen in respiration in my book during glycolysis it says Triose phosphate is oxidised (loses hydrogen) forming two molecules of pyruvate the NAD is apparently reduced by and carries the hydrogen :/ im really confused with this concept i thought oxidation just meant an electron had just moved to another molecule not the whole molecule(hydrogen) if someone could explain this would really help thanksss ! :/
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    (Original post by Adl91)
    So it seems a bit shocking that i dont understand this at this point but i am really confused with oxidation and reduction reactions when it talks about hydrogen in respiration in my book during glycolysis it says Triose phosphate is oxidised (loses hydrogen) forming two molecules of pyruvate the NAD is apparently reduced by and carries the hydrogen :/ im really confused with this concept i thought oxidation just meant an electron had just moved to another molecule not the whole molecule(hydrogen) if someone could explain this would really help thanksss ! :/
    Have a look here: http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...finitions.html

    Basically, another definition of oxidation is a loss of hydrogen.
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    (Original post by usycool1)
    Have a look here: http://www.chemguide.co.uk/inorganic...finitions.html

    Basically, another definition of oxidation is a loss of hydrogen.
    Hmm thanks still a bit confused with the concept though dont really understand why gaining an electron is the same as gaining hydrogen maybe im lacking the foundations of it need it explained as im a bit slow :/
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    When two non metal elements bond, they form a covalent bond. This means that they share electrons to get their outer shells up to a full number of electrons. Since hydrogen only has one electron, when something bonds with hydrogen it is like gaining an electron (the H electron is part of the covalent bond and is shared by the two atoms). If you have done chemistry it should make a bit more sense, but if not then I would just accept it or ask your teacher
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    (Original post by Sparticon)
    When two non metal elements bond, they form a covalent bond. This means that they share electrons to get their outer shells up to a full number of electrons. Since hydrogen only has one electron, when something bonds with hydrogen it is like gaining an electron (the H electron is part of the covalent bond and is shared by the two atoms). If you have done chemistry it should make a bit more sense, but if not then I would just accept it or ask your teacher
    Ahhh good explanation i understand now been long time since chem lol one outer electron makes perfect sense now thanks alot man !!
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    Haha, no problem, glad to help!
 
 
 
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